Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Scooped by Seth Dixon! | Geography Education |
Free site dedicated to help teachers educate and engage students using Google Earth
Seth Dixon's insight:

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed by an AP teacher to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.  Click here for a video tutorial.

Tags:  google, virtual tours, geospatial, edtech.

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 29, 2013 9:54 AM

Use Google Earth in the classroom with clickable layering of maps.  Great for bringing Geography into your classroom!

Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 2015 5:18 AM

GTAV Technology and cartography in Geography

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.

Scooped by Seth Dixon!

Terraced Rice Fields

Terraced Rice Fields | Geography Education |
See a photo of an aerial view of a terraced rice field in China and download free wallpaper from National Geographic.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This image shows is one of the more beautiful cultural landscapes that shows the great extent of agricultural  modifications of the environment.  National Geographic's photo of the day is a great source for images that start class discussions and can enliven class content. You may download a high resolution version of the image here


Tags: National Geographic, agriculture, landscape, China.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:42 PM

Rice fields are pretty neat. You need to be one meticulous person to be able to build these fields. The shapes of them and the erosion that occurs to the oldest ones form interesting patterns. These ariel shots are worthwhile looking at and seeing where exactly the rice is growing is cool.

Suggested by QuizFortune!

Lakes Quiz

Lakes Quiz | Geography Education |
Can you locate these famous lakes? Challenge your knowledge of lakes from around the world - some more well known than others - in our Lakes and Countries Quiz.
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon!

European women marry, give hope to Samaritans

European women marry, give hope to Samaritans | Geography Education |
MOUNT GERIZIM, West Bank (AP) — The Samaritans, a rapidly dwindling sect dating to biblical times, have opened their insular community to brides imported from eastern Europe in a desperate quest to preserve their ancient culture.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some folk cultures, such as the Samaritans, have historically intermarried and have been plagued by genetic diseases.  Recently, they have turned to global solutions to their local demographic woes.  "Five young women from Russia and Ukraine have moved to this hilltop village in recent years to marry local men, breathing new life into the community."  

Tagsfolk culture, gender, population, Russia, religion, culture,
Middle East

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 12:14 PM

This article describes a how the small religious group, the Samaritans, have seen their numbers shrink to unsustainable levels and have been forced to turn outside to find wives. These men are importing brides from places like Ukraine because of a significant gender imbalance and heightened risk of birth defects due to genetic homogenization over the centuries. These circumstances present an fairly unique case of migration, one which should it become a standard practice, could have an effect on the culture of the Samaritan communities.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:43 PM

The Samaritans, a rapidly dwindling sect dating to biblical times, have opened their insular community to brides imported from eastern Europe in a desperate quest to preserve their ancient culture. Five young women from Russia and Ukraine have moved to this hilltop village in recent years to marry local men, breathing new life into the community that has been plagued by genetic diseases caused by generations of intermarriage. Husni Cohen, a 69-year-old village elder, said the marriages are not ideal, since there is always a risk that the newcomers may decide to leave. But in a community whose population has fallen to roughly 360 people, he saw little choice.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:30 PM

This is why Denmark gives plenty of incentives for women to have babies so to make sure the population growth stays above 2.06 which is the average number needed to keep a steady population.

Suggested by Thomas Schmeling!

19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective

19 Maps That Will Help You Put The United States In Perspective | Geography Education |
Seth Dixon's insight:

This classic image is paired with some other great maps and videos that help put the true size of the United States into perspective. 

Tags: perspective, map.  

Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, March 18, 2013 10:30 AM

Great map tools for kids and adults to get a better understanding of relative size of US vs the world.

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, March 18, 2013 2:05 PM

This site has lots of great examples of size comparisons between the United States and other coutnries/continents around the world. Which one is the most surprising to you? Why do you think you had a different idea of the size of the place that surprised you?

Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa's curator insight, March 18, 2013 9:13 PM

A punta de TIC el mundo se achicó !

Rescooped by Seth Dixon from Geography & Current Events!

APHUG Films Presents...

Promotional video for AP Human Geography enrollment

Via Mr. David Burton
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is video is a great tool to drum up interest in an AP Human Geography course produced by David Burton.  Similar videos and things designed to promote the discipline and it's study can be found under the tag, "geo-inspiration." 

Tags: APHG, geo-inspiration.

Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa's curator insight, March 18, 2013 9:16 PM

La geografía tiene que ver con todo.

Con ella entendemos el desarrollo humano.

Echa un vistazo.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, May 11, 2013 12:37 PM

I need to show this Day 1 of next school year

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Google Lit Trips

Seth Dixon's insight:

Google Earth is a great teaching tool for geographers, but it is also a way to bring geography and spatial thinking to other disciplines.  Google Lit Trips makes the journeys that take place in literature (both fiction and non-fiction) all the more real by mapping out the movements as a KML file that can be viewed in Google Earth.  By embedding pictures, websites, videos and text into the path, this becomes an incredibly interactive resource for teachers of all levels. 

Tags: google, virtual tours, English, edtech.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 17, 2013 7:51 AM

Utiliser Google Earth pour cartographier l'itinéraire de personnages de fiction, afin de mêler géographie et littérature. 

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's comment, March 19, 2013 10:30 PM
I'm very appreciative. Thanks! Jerome,
Scooped by Seth Dixon!

Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Geography Education |
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).
Seth Dixon's insight:

These apartments are so small that they can only be photographed from the ceiling.  Massive urbanization with limited space means that real estate is at a premium and many laborers will not be able to afford large living spaces.  Hong Kong is an extreme example of this and it brings new meaning to the term "high-density housing." 

Tagshousing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?

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Ten Years After the Invasion of Iraq: The Human Cost

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of war can be staggering and far-reaching.  Often the costs are much higher than anticipated at the beginning.  Read this press release for more details on the recent findings regarding the actual costs of the Iraq War, which are estimated to have cost over 190,000 lives and $2.2 trillion. 

Tags: Iraq, conflict, K12, political, MiddleEast, war.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:25 AM

The death of 190,000 people due to war is always a tragedy.  There is a positive side to this number, however.  The Iraq war cost 190,00 lives in ten years, an average of 19,000 deaths a year. In World War II, the Russians alone lost 9,000,000 people, in a much shorter amount of time.  We are no longer losing large chunks of our population in wars, due to new technology and combat strategies. 

Suggested by Jorge Joo Nagata!

Mi Geografía

Mi Geografía | Geography Education |

'Mi geografía' es un portal que nace como respuesta a la necesidad de entregar conocimientos fundamentales de geografía tanto a niños como a adultos, de una forma amena y atractiva, para que todos puedan conocer y comprender mejor el medio que nos rodea.

El portal se divide en tres secciones: una para niños (5 - 10 años), otra para jóvenes (11 - 17 años) y otra para adultos (padres y profesores). Cada una de ellas aborda de manera diferente y con distintas metodologías los más variados temas geográficos.

Seth Dixon's insight:

My apologies to my primarily English speaking audience while I type in Spanish to announce a Spanish-language resource.  Para los que hablen español este es un recurso alineada especificamente con el plan de estudios de Chile. Este sitio parece ser increíble.

JoseMªRiveros's curator insight, March 16, 2013 11:25 AM
Una forma didáctica de aprender geografía.
Jose Gal's comment, March 16, 2013 11:43 AM
Gracias por el aporte en español, muchas gracias verdaderamente
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Crop Diversification in Malawi

Crop Diversification in Malawi | Geography Education |

"The tiny black-eyed pea is about to wage battle in Malawi.  The small country in southeast Africa is the site of a project to help with food security, nutrition and income.  Western University researchers are among those who will work with 30,000 farmers to help diversify crops into protein-rich legumes, such as the black-eyed pea, a popular type of cow pea in Malawi."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: food, agriculture, Africa, Malawi, unit 5 agriculture.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, March 14, 2013 3:48 PM

Review for you!

Seth Dixon's comment, March 15, 2013 8:44 PM
A good friend of mine is currently working for USAID in Malawi. This is what he had to say: I think crop diversification is really important here in Malawi. Most farmers have a heavy reliance on maize,which results in reduced hunger but there continues to be persistent malnutrition among children as their diets consist of mostly maize.Almost everyone here grows maize, you might be a school teacher or a health worker, but you are also most likely growing maize as well. Farmers are very risk averse here, so introducing a new crop takes time, finding the few willing to experiment and then using them to show their neighbors of the benefits. Other organizations are working on crop diversification here in Malawi, the US government, Catholic Relief Services, and other international development partners. Although not spelled out in the article, the majority of farmers are actually women, and agricultural production is typically for household subsistence with minimal cash cropping. As crop diversification increases, cash crops will provide more resources for families to pay for education and health for their families, but probably more importantly families will start diversifying their nutritional intake beyond maize. In a country where 42% of under 5 children are stunted, this will be a positive development. My wife was just out in the South of the country with CRS and was seeing some of the work that they are doing towards crop diversification as a result of USAID funding. She was really impressed to see how different vulnerable groups have been targeted by similar programs. She was able to see changes in rural villages in very insecure food zones. She saw how those lead farmers, willing to adopt new techniques or diversify crops, plant cash crops, etc, are reaping the benefits. Their neighbors are seeing it in action and are now adopting the techniques. It is not an immediate adoption, you have to give it time. These people are very risk averse, when set backs aren't just an inconvenience, but translate into starvation, it is understandable why it takes time. It also makes it more impressive when you find those willing to take the risks and try to set aside some land for a new crop. I am sure my agricultural colleagues would have more sophisticated answers but just some of my personal thoughts/observations."
Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks!

'Serendipitous Interaction' Key Workplace Design

'Serendipitous Interaction' Key Workplace Design | Geography Education |
Executives have recently focused attention on Silicon Valley's workplace culture. While companies like Google, Facebook and Yahoo operate by their own set of rules, what happens there may influence how many Americans work.
Seth Dixon's insight:

How does the spatial layout of a workplace impact productivity and corporate culture?  "Google has spent a lot of time studying what makes workplaces innovative and casual interactions are important. Sullivan lists three factors to make that set companies apart: learning by interaction, collaborations and fun."  Spaces that encourage interaction and collaboration increase productivity.  Spaces that are 'fun' help facilitate a vibrant community and deepens worker loyalty.  

Tags: spatial, architecture, labor, podcast.


No comment yet.
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Catholic Demographics

Catholic Demographics | Geography Education |
Infographics showing the distribution of the Roman Catholic population in the world, where it has risen and fallen in recent years.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As mentioned earlier, a South American pope was a symbolic recognition of the demographic shift in the Church's population away from Europe. 

Tags: culturereligion, Christianity.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 4:50 PM

Pope Francis is not only the first Jesuit Pope, but the first from the Americas.  Born in Buenos Aires, the Pope represents the immense Catholic population in Latin America.


Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 2015 11:09 PM

It makes sense that Europe has one of the highest rates of Catholicism in the world because Christianity originated in Europe. Also, I believe that it makes sense that more than half of the Catholic population spread southward along the prime meridian to Africa. However, I don't understand how when Catholicism spread overseas, it didn't go to North America before it went to Latin America. So I did some research on that and Catholicism actually spread to the caribbean which is southeast of the United States and it spread mostly towards South America rather than up to North America. However, that doesn't explain why South America has a higher Catholic percentage than Europe. All I know is that Europe use to have a higher percentage of Catholics over Latin America about a century ago but now, Latin America has more Catholics.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 1:21 PM

it makes sense that south America has a large number of Catholics, as it was colonized by Portugal and Spain, which were two of the largest and most constantly catholic countries on earth.

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2013 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament

2013 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament | Geography Education |
Seth Dixon's insight:

The brackets are rarely as "regional" as the names Midwest, West, South and East would suggest; still a map of all the participating teams shows that there a geography to basketball participation.  See also this collection of maps visualizing basketball fandom.  Also, what about the high schools areas that produce college basketball players?  What patterns to you see? 

Emily Ross Cook's curator insight, March 21, 2013 8:28 AM

Oh man! I love March Madness!

Suggested by Michael Miller!

The Cyrus Cylinder: An Artifact Ahead of Its Time

The Cyrus Cylinder: An Artifact Ahead of Its Time | Geography Education |
This relic from ancient Persia had a profound influence on the Founding Fathers
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video can be seen as the three minute version of a 20 minute TED talk by Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum.  He discusses the profound importance that the Cyrus Cylinder (A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script) had on modern political though on multiculturalism.

David Ricci's comment, April 30, 2013 10:07 AM
I decided to write a comment on this video because there were no others. After watching the video though, i realized that it was quite interesting. I love looking into the history of ancient civilizations such as the Roman empire. This video takes an artifact from the ancient Persian Empire and proves that it was used by our founding fathers to help dictate the way we live today. Persia was the first empire that allowed complete religious freedom. When Jefferson was writing the Declaration he looked to Cyrus and the cylinder for inspiration. At this time period they were doing something unheard of by having complete religious freedom and the fathers were not sure how they could make it work. With little experience they went to the only know successful example of this type of society. All societies have gotten inspirations from history and this is an interesting bit of information about where our countries inspiration came from.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:52 AM
Again, as a history major, I found this video to be particularly interesting. I was not aware of the Cyrus Cylinder despite my deep interest in both ancient history and the American Revolution.
The Cyrus Cylinder and the U.S. Constitution are unique because they both provided for equal protection of different races, religions, etc. Because of this, both pieces allowed for a united entity that encompassed diverse cultures, making for a heterogeneous geographic area. I think this video was most interesting because it shows that despite both spatial and chronological separation, common ideas can transcend all different barriers to be upheld and striven towards for a better world.
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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | Geography Education |
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.
Seth Dixon's insight:

How are the lives of these children different from those in your neighborhood?  How are their lives the same? 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:01 PM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 21, 2015 4:28 AM

This is an alternative to using "Where children sleep" as an introductory activity. 

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St Patrick's Day celebrated around the world – in pictures

St Patrick's Day celebrated around the world – in pictures | Geography Education |
From Moscow to New York via Vilnius and the pyramids of Egypt, St Patrick's Day is celebrated with parades and a lot of green face paint
Seth Dixon's insight:

Being in Chicago on Saint Patrick's Day one year was the highlight of my trip.  Seeing the river green was truly an impressive sight and the pictures don't quite do it justice.  Today, 34.5 million US residents claimed Irish ancestry in 2011, more than 7 times population of Ireland.

Pedro Arocha Silva's comment, March 18, 2013 10:55 PM
Nice Chicago pic :D
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:35 AM

St Patrick's day has become a truly worldwide holiday. It seems that everyone wants to be Irish. In the United States the nations Irish community has made this celebration a key day on the calendar in the United States. St Patrick's day celebrations have become an integral part of American life and culture. I often wonder, what people in Ireland actually think of our American St Patrick's day. Do they commercialize the holiday to the same degree that we do? At any rate, the holiday continues to grow in popularity.  I see that as a positive for the entire Irish community.

Suggested by Heather Ramsey!

After boom and bust, Sun Belt cities see glimmers again

After boom and bust, Sun Belt cities see glimmers again | Geography Education |
WASHINGTON -- With their economies and housing markets gaining strength, some of the nation's biggest boom-to-bust cities in the Sun Belt are starting to become magnets again, attracting a growing number of people primarily from the northern part...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: economic, migration.

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Seth Dixon's insight:

De-extinction is a new term for to me but this week a TEDx conference hosted by National Geographic focused completely on this concept on the possibility of reviving formerly extinct species. Just because we think we can bring back a lost species, does that mean we should?  What would be the benefits?  Disadvantages? 

I've read enough about passenger pigeons to know that beyond overhunting, the species went extinct as large swaths of North American forests became fragmented and modified.  While we may be able to theoretically bring back a species, we cannot rewind the clock and bring all the essential ingredients to their former ecosystem that allowed them to thrive in the first place.  De-extinction would NOT be repairing the world so that it was as if the extinction never happened, since other species in the ecosystem have adapted to their absence. Given the length of their absence, could these be considered "invasive species?"     

Tags: biogeography, environment, National Geographic, environment modify, ecology, historical, TED.

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State Shape Necklaces

State Shape Necklaces | Geography Education |
So much of who we are stems from where we came from. Each southern state's culture is proudly unique...just like its natives. These beautiful brass State Shape Necklaces are the perfect bold, yet subtle, way to wear your state pride.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This doesn't cover every state, and it may even offend some with how they've drawn the south.  Some southern states (in this northerner's mind) are not included.  Which state would you add to the list?  Any you'd remove?

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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Geography Education |

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a compilation of 42 photos that highlight ideas of  population growth, urbanization and sustainability.  Pictured above is the favela Joaquim de Queiros, a hillside neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. 


Tags: population, images, unit 2 population.

Roman M's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 12:49 PM

I saw the pictures. It is amazing how peoples back yards are all different. From water to dirt to garbage to no back yards at all. I was commenting on the fact with the population growth there is only one way to build and that is up. Then i saw the pictures of the High risers and how tall they were and so close together. It is a no wonder people live in a stressful environment. There is nothing like living in a wide open land lot with grass in Wyoming or Montana but that sure will change in the next 50 years.

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Thinking Geographically About International Issues

Thinking Geographically About International Issues | Geography Education |

"Brown University's Choices Program invites secondary level geography teachers to apply for a 2013 Summer Institute that focuses on using the Choices approach and materials to ask What is Where, Why, and So What?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Applications for this tremendous Summer Institute are due April 8th and I am very pleased to announce that I'll be one of the presenters there at Brown University.  I hope that many of seriously consider applying.  I look forward to collaborating with all the participants in person (the only cost is travel to and from Providence, RI).  

TagsRhode Island, APHG, training.

Peter Phillips's comment, March 15, 2013 4:31 PM
I like the title "what is where, why and so what?"
Suggested by Allison Anthony!

How To Find A Food Desert Near You

How To Find A Food Desert Near You | Geography Education |
A new clickable atlas shows just how far it is to the grocery store, everywhere in the United States. "Food deserts" are the focus of state, local and federal anti-obesity efforts.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: foodlocavoremapping.

Dean Haakenson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 1:23 PM

Great for looking at agriculture issues in the US and the debate over the local food movement v. supermarkets.

Scooped by Seth Dixon!

Printable Map of Central America

Printable Map of Central America | Geography Education |
Use a printable outline map that depicts Central America.

This is my favorite map to use in classroom activities for Central America.  Here is the full list of their (free) printable maps. 

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Top 10 Most Populated Cities In The World

Top 10 Most Populated Cities In The World | Geography Education |
Urbanization has led to what are known as mega-cities, cities with a population of over 10 million people. These mega-cities have become so large that they often lead to terrible pollution, traffic, and extreme poverty.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Over half the global population lives in cities, and the problems confronting these megacities will loom large for future sustainability issues--both at local and global scales. This list ranks the cities by city limits and governance jurisdiction (not by the expanded metropolitan area).  

Tags: urban, megacities, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

Erik Seglem's comment, March 15, 2013 11:22 AM
This is an interesting article, but it doesn't say how they came to their numbers. It seems like they may only be talking about within the 'city' limits, or some very old data. has some very different numbers as of the beginning of this year, their numbers however are the entire aggomeration and not just the 'city' limits.
Sally Egan's curator insight, March 18, 2013 7:17 PM

Over half the global population lives in cities, and the problems confronting these megacities will loom large for future sustainability issues--both at local and global scales. This list ranks the cities by city limits and governance jurisdiction (not by the expanded metropolitan area). 


 This is an interesting article, but it doesn't say how they came to their numbers. It seems like they may only be talking about within the 'city' limits, or some very old data. has some very different numbers as of the beginning of this year, their numbers however are the entire aggomeration and not just the 'city' limits.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities