Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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If Economists Controlled The Borders

If Economists Controlled The Borders | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What would the perfect immigration system look like? We asked three economists to dream big.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an intriguing podcast focused on how to best manage national borders if the only goal were to strengthen the economy (they center the conversation the United States).  These economists envision plans with more incentives to attract a labor force that is more highly-skilled is crucial to having a rational migration policy.  How how you manage the borders if you were in charge?  How would your plan strengthen the country?  

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Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

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chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:33 PM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
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Iceland wants to ban Internet porn

Iceland wants to ban Internet porn | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Iceland is working on banning Internet pornography, calling explicit online images a threat to children.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Given the cultural values and legal traditions of Western Europe in general (and Scandinavia more specifically), Iceland stands apart on this particular issue.  While most Western countries would see this as a freedom of speech issue, many in Iceland view it as child protection issue. 

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NOVA: Earth From Space

NOVA: Earth From Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Detailed satellite images reveal the web of connections that sustain life on Earth.
Seth Dixon's insight:

"Earth From Space is a groundbreaking two-hour special that reveals a spectacular new space-based vision of our planet. Produced in extensive consultation with NASA scientists, NOVA takes data from earth-observing satellites and transforms it into dazzling visual sequences, each one exposing the intricate and surprising web of forces that sustains life on earth."


This documentary shows something interesting for the physical geographer, human geographers, and geospatial technology specialists.  In other words, this touches on just about all things geographic (with cool images!).  The overarching theme is that so many things in this world that we wouldn't imagine are actually interconnected with excellent examples. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples, physical.

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Kenneth Holzman's comment, February 17, 2013 7:37 PM
Thanks so much for this link! I'd completely missed this on PBS, and it is EXACTLY the kind of video I'm trying to get my AP Human Geography students to watch right now. This is getting shared with ALL my kids ASAP. :-)
dilaycock's comment, February 18, 2013 4:02 PM
I just love that Scoop.it allows resources to be shared so easily, and in a manner that is so accessible to students everywhere. Thanks Kenneth.
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A Crazy But Rational Solution To Our Electoral College Problem

A Crazy But Rational Solution To Our Electoral College Problem | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On three different occasions, the candidate with the most votes didn't become President of the United States. We call this "The Electoral College Problem." Here a solution. Simple. Mathematical. Rational.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As a disclaimer, I'm not endorsing the removal of all current state borders, but I think that this is a great thought exercise that involves some serious spatial thinking and geography knowledge to create this map (or even to critique and discuss it).  This map represents an attempt to restructure the states so that each state would have equal value in the electoral college with roughly equal populations (county borders remained firm).  What about the physical and human geography would make some of these "states" better (or worse) than the current configuration of the 50 states? How would this 'redistricting' impact your local region? 


Tags: political, gerrymandering, mapping, unit 4 political.

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Gary Pascoa's comment, March 1, 2013 9:43 PM
I know the founding fathers would be horrified as this cuts into the whole idea of the electoral college: to place a further check on the majority when electing a president. Nonetheless, I would support a redrawing of the map that would lean toward a popular vote system.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 8:27 PM
Interesting idea, however I can't say this is a "rational" solution to the Electoral College. It is actually completely irrational to think that the borders could be redrawn and everyone could be redistricted every four years... They can't even manage to get a census out every year... Logistical nightmare. I agree with Ken and Gary, let the people choose with the popular vote
Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 5, 2015 5:02 PM

Far out

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How are satellite images different from photographs?

How are satellite images different from photographs? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Satellites acquire images in black and white, so how is it possible to create the beautiful color images that we see on television, in magazines, and on the internet? Computers provide us with the answer.

Images created using different bands (or wavelengths) have different contrast (light and dark areas). Computers make it possible to assign 'false color' to these black and white images. The three primary colors of light are red, green, and blue. Computer screens can display an image in three different bands at a time, by using a different primary color for each band. When we combine these three images we get a 'false color image.'

Find tutorials and links to free compositing programs here."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: remote sensing, imagesgeospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Ken Halpern's comment, March 1, 2013 1:23 PM
Very interesting to see how the process works. This is very helpful when trying to get a point across.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 8:59 PM
The Electromagnetic scale always confused me in High School! Hahaha. I also didn't know that satellites only take pictures in black and white.
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When an asteroid gets too close : ImaGeo

When an asteroid gets too close : ImaGeo | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of you have seen the YouTube video of the meteor in Russia this week (and were you wondering why so many Russians have cameras on their dashboards?).  This show the geologic impact of the largest of meteors and here are links to a map (with the data) of all the known meteorites to have landed.  Pictured above is Meteor Crater in Arizona, one of the most powerful impacts the Earth has even seen.   

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Changing Ethnic patterns in London

Changing Ethnic patterns in London | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Of all the changes announced by the 2011 census, one of the most startling is the rapid change in the ethnic composition of London's population.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The fact the immigrants moving to the UK have flocked to London is not surprising (View a map of the census data).  Immigration isn't the only component to this situation.  White Britons are also leaving London in large number, prompting some to refer to this as "White Flight."  Today, white Britons are no longer the majority population within London (but still the largest ethnic group).  Some feel that this story has gone underreported and deserves more analysis.  What elements of human geography should an observer of this situation use in their analysis?  


Tags: ethnicity, London, migration, census, urban.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:39 PM

The most surprising piece of information in this article is that white Britons are leaving London because of the minorities that are moving in. As of 2013 only 59.9% of London was white, meaning that the miniorities are taking over Ethnic part of London much faster then first anticipated.   

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2014 5:43 PM

Since immigrants have flocked into London, it appears some of the White population has left the city because of it. The ethnic change is happening very quickly in London and White British population is no longer the majority. As large numbers of immigrants enter London, large numbers of White people leave the city. London is becoming a melting pot rather quickly. 

 
Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:40 PM

If white flight is happening in Europe, where are all of its native migrating to? I know for years, there has been a large migrant population from the continent of Africa migrating to Europe, more specifically London, but where in the world could Britain's native be migrating to? Its common to hear of people migrating from rural areas to better neighborhoods, but with the influx of people looking for a better livelihood resemble that of the people living in countries such as India, China and Japan?

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China's demand for cotton is helping give the global market for the commodity a boost

China's demand for cotton is helping give the global market for the commodity a boost | Geography Education | Scoop.it
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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 16, 2013 7:35 PM

Higher prices HUGGERS?

 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:45 PM

If Chinese aren't producing cotton and Chinese aren't in a need for cotton what can go wrong? Investors can have something to do with that. The investors need to bet on the highest global cotton prices in order for them to get their supply. Since cotton prices are raising through the roof, China has been producing cotton like crazy.

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Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland

Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For years, researchers have puzzled over why Viking descendents abandoned Greenland in the late 15th century.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As the climate began to cool the diet of the Greenland settlers changed dramatically.  Originally their diets consisted of about 20-30% seafood, but as farming became nearly impossible on this increasingly marginal land, it jumped up to about 80%.  The economic livelihood of the settlements was in danger and the solution lay in a cultural transition, but one that they didn't want to make.  "They saw themselves as farmers and ranchers rather than fishermen and hunters...[and were] worried about the increasing loss of their Scandinavian identity."  In essence they abandoned Greenland in part because they chose not abandon their Viking heritage to embrace a culture that would have be more like that of the Inuits.  Cultural factors may have mattered more than economic limitations.

 

Tags: Greenland, folk culture, historical.

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James Good's comment, April 19, 2013 6:33 PM
It would make sense that the Vikings abandoned Greenland because they felt isolated from their mother country. There must have been a strong Scandanavian folk culture that the people of Greenland valued enough to make such a drastic movement. It is very likely that the people of Greenland cherished their home land and its culture. This culture was probably more exciting to them then the dismal life in the far north.

Once the demand for walrus tusks and seal skins decreased, there was really no need for the Vikings to stay in Greenland anyways. If they did not want to become farmers and take advantage of the potential farming land that Greenland had to offer, then there would be no benefit to staying there anyway.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:25 AM
Humans have been exploring our planet for thousands of years. Settlements are established, and deemed successful or unsuccessful. The successful ones are still around today, however the unsuccessful one’s usually fall to the wayside and are forgotten. Many things can make a colony of human exploration unsuccessful, much like Viking colonies in Greenland. These colonies were abandoned and archeologists have search for the reasons why. Questions of the fertility of the land and available animals to hunt have been reasons that archeologists use to explain the colonial abandonment.
The push and pull factors of ancient Viking life are apparent through their migratory patterns. There are many possible reasons for the Vikings to have left this colony though archeologists are struggling to find just one. Food source seems to be a major reason why other colonies were abandoned, though seal meat does not seem to be at a shortage in this area. Ancient reason of migrating is similar to modern ones, however they are also very different. Globalization has changed the way humans live, the interconnectedness of the world has made living in places that could support life in ancient times possible.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:11 PM
Of course they left, who would want to be basically stranded on Greenland away from any other civilization? Not me for sure. Plus, the lack of supplied they were receiving and tools it would have been near impossible to live and thrive in Greenland. They were also losing their identity; they were thinking of themselves more as farmers and ranchers rather than fishermen and hunters, their original identity as Scandinavians. Nonetheless it was imperative that they leave and head home because the colony in Greenland surely would have run dry and died out. If not for the overkilling of seals for food or the bone-chilling winters, I might theorize that they might stay in Greenland however that is not how history unfolded and it doesn’t surprise me that they left. Like James said, once their trade had virtually ceased, the outpost in Greenland was useless because they could be just living back home where you weren’t in extreme weather conditions and living off of seal meat.
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Landlocked Countries Quiz

Landlocked Countries Quiz | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If your knowledge of geography is 'locked in', now's the perfect time to show it off in our Landlocked Countries Geography Quiz! Play now!
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As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts

As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The nation's fertility rate has slipped below replacement levels partly because of the recession and a decline in immigration. That's raising concern about the nation's future."

Seth Dixon's insight:

During this recent recession, fertility rates in the United States have dropped with many speculating that the financial investment in child-rearing caused this shift.  The big question is this: will birth rates bounce back when the economy fully recovers or is the United States population going to follow the example of Western Europe?  What would the impact be for both of these scenarios?


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels, unit 2 population.

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Brett Sinica's comment, April 23, 2013 3:11 PM
These stats are hard to take in, because it seems like even though birth rates are considered to be dropping, the country’s total population continues to rise, and fast. Immigration probably plays a major role in the adding of new citizens, though just because birth rates are decreasing it shouldn’t necessarily mean a bad thing. With a slow increase of people, there could possibly be drops in the unemployment rate, or even poverty level at a big stretch. With fewer people in the country, it could mean less competition among others, leaving more options for people to pursue. It says at the end of the article that, “there are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” This may hold true to an extent, but look at China for example. Their population is the largest in the world, containing roughly 20 of the 30 most polluted cities and being the top consumer of energy. Though the country has an unemployment level which is half of ours, they must put in place family planning methods such as the “one-child policy” to hope for better population control. If I know the United States, I highly doubt they would ever resort to such measures, unless the government wants uproars. So maybe I’m optimistic about the birth rate drops, but it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Maybe we should rid of the self-checkouts and automated answering machines and slowdown in technology so we don’t find ourselves in a situation that’d become too hard to handle.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 2:48 PM
This decline in birth rates is largely due to the recession; people don’t want to have children because they can’t afford the care. We need to have a balance in our population. Having one age group, like elderly people, dominating over other generations can be a problem. Even though the birth rates are decreasing, our population is still growing at a steady rate. Immigrants trying to make a home for themselves and their families in the United States contribute in a big way to our population increase.
I think that when and if the economy bounces back, families will start to feel comfortable with their finances and the birth rate will spike. Yet, if the birth rate does get back to normalcy and the immigrants continue to come to this country maybe our population will see too much of an increase and overpopulation could be a problem. But I doubt our country will ever adopt the “one-child policy” currently in use in China, we will find some other way to control our population, whatever that may be.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:45 PM
The recession is a huge factor as to why the birth/fertility rate is dropping. It costs a lot of money to have a child and most people can’t afford to care for themselves never mind another baby. Even though the birth rate has been decreasing over the years, the population is still increasing due to immigration. With the birth rate decreasing the level of poverty could potentially decrease as well because there will not be an economic burden. I don’t think there should be too much of a concern about the birthrate dropping because once the economy returns to normal I’m sure people will want to expand their family. I do agree to a certain extent with the statement in the article: “Population growth leads to human innovation, and innovation leads to conservation ... There are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” Overpopulation, like in China, causes many issues, not just economically.
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Layers in the Landscape

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: historical, landscape, NYC.

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Smartphones as geospatial tools

The disastrous earthquake in Haiti taught humanitarian groups an unexpected lesson: the power of mobile devices to coordinate, inform, and guide relief efforts.


Tags: technology, disasters, Haiti, TED.

Seth Dixon's insight:

We are only beginning to see the applications of smart phones to improve peoples lives.  In this TED talk, Paul Conneally explores some of the possibilities (citizen mapping, crowd-sourced disaster recovery, etc.) that is just sitting in the palm of our collective hands. 

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Tony Hall's curator insight, February 18, 2013 6:43 AM

This is why ICT is important. No. Vital! Our students need to see things like this so that they understand the positive aspects of technology. They need to see that SMS, Facebook & Twitter are so much more than just a way sharing silly photos of themselves. This technology has the power to affect real, positive change. 

techsavvygirl's curator insight, February 18, 2013 8:21 AM

Augmenting human potential with smartphones

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 23, 4:11 AM
Responding to disasters and preparedness using technology
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IMF hits Argentina with first-ever censure of a country

IMF hits Argentina with first-ever censure of a country | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The International Monetary Fund has censured Argentina for failing to supply accurate economic data, the first time the global crisis lender has taken such an action against a member.
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chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:22 PM
The debt was paid with the IMF in 2006 but now the IMF will assist Argentina with data collection-their sovereign debt is indexed to inflation, and wonder what their international debt is
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 1:37 PM

Perhaps Argentina's under-reported inflation percents is due to the fact that its sovereign debt is indexed to inflation and has deep international debt but the IMF will assist Argentina with data collection (since 2006 their debt was paid with the IMF)

 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:25 AM

For the first time in history, the IMF has censured a member state. This is a low point for Argentina. The censure was levied due to the nations failure to provide the organization with accurate economic data. The fault is entirely on the country of Argentina in this debacle. You can not lie about how your country is performing economically. Hopefully the nation will be more forthcoming with its economic statistics in the future.

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Tea-plucking machines threaten Assam livelihoods

Tea-plucking machines threaten Assam livelihoods | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tea plucking machines are threatening the livelihoods of tea pickers in the Indian state of Assam, reports Mark Tully.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is yet another example of the uneven impacts of globalization. 

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 2014 4:42 AM

This article details how globalization is damaging the high-end tea industry of India. The Assam company, which produces high quality tea, is under pressure to mechanize their 100% human tea production due to competition. Vietnam, Kenya, and even other Indian companies produce significantly cheaper tea due to their willingness and ability to cut costs by using machines and paying their workers less. A cultural stigma toward tea workers is making hiring difficult for Assam, compounding the problems with competitors and forcing a switch to mechanization which will produce an inferior product.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:51 PM

This seems to work well for both the tea growers and the workers. The workers are compensated well and they have a job for life and the tea that is picked is of the highest quality. Unfortunately, most places on the planet go with the cheapest price, not the best quality, so I do not know how much longer this arrangement will be feasible.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:51 PM

In my town, we got rid of the old trash receptacle bins and in place we have one huge trash bin and one huge recycling bin. This has cut down the jobs immensely because now a machine just picks up the large bins. This is the same thing thats happening in India. There is now a machine that can do the humans jobs and will most likely take over for the tea picking people. Its unfortunate, but its how the world works.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   


Tags: Bangladesh, water, pollution, poverty, squatter, planning, density, South Asia, development, economic, megacities.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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The Permanence of Geography

The Permanence of Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The current rise or durability of the economies of the Global South do not signal that economic geography does not matter, but that current investment has simply shifted.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In an era where globalization has rendered distances a minor barrier to diffusion, some have erroneously concluded that geography is no longer relevant to economic development and urban planning.  Nothing could be farther from the truth, but that doesn't mean that the 'old rules' of space and place aren't be re-written.  This is a nice article that discusses the continued importance of spatial thinking and geography for urban planning.


Tags: urban, planning economic, urbanism, globalization, unit 7 cities.

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A Satellite’s View of Ship Pollution

A Satellite’s View of Ship Pollution | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Elevated levels of nitrogen dioxide pop out over certain shipping lanes in observations made by the Aura satellite between 2005-2012. The signal was the strongest over the northeastern Indian Ocean.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, remote sensing, industry, economic, unit 6 industry.

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David Collet's curator insight, February 19, 2013 10:37 PM

The Straits of Malacca show up as a highly affected band - and this from traffic that is not even bound for, or related to, Malaysia.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:30 AM

Ships are causing pollution all over the ocean because of its fuels being used. Is there other fuels we can use for ships? By finding a safer fuel it could reduce the oceans pollution. Pollution probably effects the wildlife and drinking water as well and we often eat foods and drink from the water. It not only effects the ocean it effects us as well. 

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The United States of YA

The United States of YA | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A while back, I posted in the forums asking for people to help me find a YA book for every single state in the US.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While I can't vouch for all of these books (I read more children's literature than Young Adult), I absolutely love the idea of this project.  This is a great way to make geography a cross curricular activity, especially for an English class or just for fun.  Scroll down on the right side of this image to see all the books/states on the list.  The geographic content of some of these books are minimal, but that's not the worst thing that can happen if more students are reading.  What books are at the top of your reading list?

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SchoolandUniversity's comment, February 16, 2013 2:17 AM
The United States of YA. Hey guys! This isn't an official challenge, but I really wanted to do it.
Lori Johnson's comment, February 16, 2013 9:49 AM
My favorites on the list: Under the Blood Red Sun, Deadline, The Fault in our Stars, and Dairy Queen.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 16, 2013 7:37 PM

This is for all you avid readers out there!

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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!
Seth Dixon's insight:

This list of countries that no longer exist in their current form include Czechoslovakia, Tibet, Sikkim, the Ottoman Empire and the Soviet Union. 


Tags: unit 4 political, historical, devolution.  

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

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Who buys all the flowers and jewelry on Valentine's Day?

Who buys all the flowers and jewelry on Valentine's Day? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Americans like to buy jewelry and flowers all year, not just for Valentine’s Day. How much do they spend annually, and who would probably spend the most?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fabulous set of maps that shows the value of GIS to assess the market feasiblity for any given commodity.  On this Valentine's Day, it is especially interesting to map out the zip codes that purchase the most flowers, jewelry and diamonds.    

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Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Income maps of every neighborhood in the U.S. See wealth and poverty in places like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Miami, and more.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is the most user-friendly website I've seen to map economic census data.  This maps the average household income data on top of a Google Maps basemap that can be centered on any place in the United States.  This is a great resource to share with students of just about any age. 


Tags: statistics, census, GIS, mapping, K12.

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Alejandro Restrepo's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:22 PM

Very interesting aspect of our demographics here in Central Falls. Any one with an interest in demographics and the make up our city should take a look a this and compare it to other neighborhoods in Rhode Island. Knowledge is power. Empower yourself!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 2:16 PM

Can you find your neighborhood HUGGERS?

Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:25 AM

Compare the neighborhoods in and around your area.  What trends do you see?  Any surprises?

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Geographic art projects

Geographic art projects | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I loved these cuff links that I my wife got me for our anniversary, so I thought this bracelet would be a great Valentine's Day gift for her.  Want to make your own?  Then read on. 


Tags: art.

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Dr. Kathleen Contreras's comment, February 17, 2013 3:02 AM
Where did you purchase the bracelet? Love it!
Seth Dixon's comment, April 22, 2013 10:06 PM
The bracelet was made by http://www.hotcakesdesign.com/braceletmain.html