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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005

US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Distribution of US Foreign Aid over time, 1946-2005...

 

This interactive graph is not visually intuitive and easy to interpret, but it is a wealth of information about the United States geopolitical policies throughout time in addition to it's humanitarian aid throughout the developing world.  For example, you can see that the aid to Vietnam from 1965-1973 exploded, and to Israel from 1976-2002.  In 1947, the United Kingdom (under the Marshall Plan) accounted for over half of all of the international aid.   

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:05 PM

In this graph it shows the US foreign aid over time from 1946-2005. In this diagram it shows the difference in 1965-1973 from Vietnam sky rocketed and the same thing happened in '76-2002 in Israel.  But the Marshall plan once enacted helped the UK people and other nations.

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One billion slum dwellers

One billion slum dwellers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
One billion people worldwide live in slums, a number that will likely double by 2030. The characteristics of slum life vary greatly between geographic regions, but they are generally inhabited by the very poor or socially disadvantaged.

 

There was significant publicity last year when the world population reached 7 billion.  Barely a whisper was heard when the global population of slum dwellers exceeded 1 billion.  When the world's population reached 7 billion, it was used as a moment to reflect on sustainable growth, resources and the common good for humanity.  This 'milestone' of 1 billion slum dwellers needs to also serve as a teaching moment to reflect on urbanization, migration, human development and the underlying causes that have lead to this explosive growth primarily in the developing world. 

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Nasry Says Hi's curator insight, January 17, 4:49 AM

So, by 2030, its likely that there will be 2 billion people living in slums.

 

Wonderful.

 

What I find most peculiar is, that no matter how much the first world nations insinuate that they are doing their best to solve the problem, work together to end world hunger, blah blah blah. The fact is, according to a video I recently watched, that no matter how much money in alms are given to those in poverty, the country will almost always include taxes, pay deductions, etcetera, and this amount is more than the amount that they had given to them. So technically, the situation is getting worse.

 

Fantastic.

 

I understand that money is a sensitive matter, but really, if you think about it, the government of poorer countries would be overrun by corruption. All because the richer nations care about making money and put that priority over everything else. And here in the fourth richest nation in the world (as of now), our ministers are getting paid hundreds of thousands of dollars monthly to prevent corruption, but we're still rolling in seas of money.So why not help these less privileged countries?

 

I can think of only one reason, and that reason i have mentioned earlier: Corruption. We might be donating to the people of a country, but before that money goes to the people, it would have to go through the government. And there it begins. Say we donate 2 Million Dollars. A lot of money, right? Well, say that Country X has a hundred members of parliament. And to shut everyone up, everyone gets ten thousand dollars. Common sense tells us that they will not get the full amount. Count the authorities the money has to pass through, how many hands the money has exchanged with, the number of pockets that amount of money has filled, and you get only a fraction of what we gave. Considering Country X is a fairly large country, the amount of money will get further divided and the people will only get probably a millionth of what they were supposed to get.

 

Now I have lived in Singapore all my life, and I know I am not in the right position to say this, because i probably will never know how the poorest of the poor survive. But I'm gonna say it anyway.

 

WHY SO MATERIALISTIC???????

 

The money you have is only temporary. Its just a piece of paper. If you have been corrupted, please stop. Because the poorest people in your country are probably farmers. And farmers make food. More money for them,  more incentive for them to work. More work done, more food you get. The more food you get, the less starved you are, the better your country will improve, and eventually, Country X could be a powerful nation.

 

Singapore is a perfect example. Back when it gained independence in 1965, the entire country was practically a slum. But now, less then half a century later, we are now the fourth richest nation in the world.

 

And for the record, I have no idea why I sounded so angry at the beginning.

 

Sean Lim Lin Yuan's comment, January 27, 8:15 PM
Hi wow
Jung Dohun's comment, January 27, 8:43 PM
It is not so easy as you think. There are many countries that does not have land suitable for farming. Also, farming requires water and many countries does not even have water for people to drink. If it was so easy for a country to be wealthy, there might not even be a poor country at all. There must be a good reason behind it and we, for now should not interfere. At most we can do is to donate :)
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How a Gold Mining Boom is Killing the Children of Nigeria

How a Gold Mining Boom is Killing the Children of Nigeria | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It is a pattern seen in various parts of the world — children being sickened from exposure to lead from gold mining and processing.

 

One of the core concepts in geo-literacy is the ability to make connections between seemingly unrelated issues.  Resource production for a global market is a topic is far-reaching implications and interconnections.     

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The Crew's curator insight, November 26, 2013 6:35 AM

While gold mining is economically beneficial to Nigeria, it is not acceptable for the exposure of lead from the mining and processing to affect the health of children. You are ruining the lives of youth, some who may be future miners. Ultimately, is the money aspect of this situation outweighing the risk of wiping out a generation?

-Scout

Dalton Denmark's curator insight, December 1, 2013 7:43 AM

gold mining poses many beneficial aspects to the abismal economy that africa posesses, however the lead poisoning and possible loss o a generation to me is too big of a risk to jeapordize. with that i do acknowledge why it is tempting to continue and just cope with the health deteririation and develop methods to try and circumvent this problem, however that in my opinion would be a very ignorant decision, this is a prime example of a "rock and a hard place" scenario, but i believe the best decision that could be made would be to substantiate a differant practice, and avoid gold mining. -Dalton Denmark

Briley Angle's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:33 AM

The number of children dying is much more important and higher than the price of mining gold . We need to put something into effect tob stop mining production so we can save hundreds of African children . They are losing whole generations of kids . This is a serious issue .

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American Human Development Project

American Human Development Project | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Measure of America is the first-ever human development report for a wealthy, developed nation.

 

The stated mission of the American Human Development Program is to provide easy-to-use yet methodologically sound tools for understanding well-being and opportunity in America and to stimulate fact-based dialogue about issues such as health, education and income.  This is another treasure trove of maps, charts, graphs, raw data all begging to be used as to enhance a student project.  This would be perfect to introduce after teaching about the Human Development Index.  

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Luke Walker's curator insight, February 18, 2013 5:20 PM

This is an amazing tool that allows you to look at the human development index (HDI) across the United States by county, state, or major urban area. You can sort the data according to racial demographics as well. It's a powerful tool that helps to answer "What factors affect human development?"

Follow the link and then choose "Tools" and "Interactive Maps" to find the program.

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Body Mass Index (BMI) by Country

Body Mass Index (BMI) by Country | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This map shows World trends in age-standardized mean Body Mass Index (BMI) 199 countries over 28 years. The worldwide prevalence of obesity has nearly doubled since 1980, according to a project that tracked risk factors for heart disease and stroke.
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Mapping Flickr colors

Mapping Flickr colors | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The idea in a nutshell is to map the dominant colors of Flickr photos located in places across the map.  This poses some interesting cartographic decisions with are outlined in the link, but interesting patterns emerge (more blue on the coast and riverbanks, more green in large urban parks, etc.).  Certainly, this is interesting foray in geovisualization and cartographic rendering. 

 

For teaching geography classes: what would a map like this of your campus or local neighborhood look like?  Could students make something similar?  How would students' interpret the landscape and environment differently if you were more intently focused on color?

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Sam Henry's comment, August 27, 2012 8:10 AM
This is an incredible idea. As a photographer, I can see how this can be considered helpful and art at the same time. The only thing that bugs me is the colors. I'm sure they have a meaning, but there needs to be a legend on the map as to their meaning. Still, great idea
Seth Dixon's comment, August 27, 2012 9:15 AM
I think our campus would be brown...it is really using flickr as a course resolution surrogate for color.
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Detroit's Urban Renewal Challenges

This msnbc video clip (from the UP w/Chris Hayes) looks at the struggles and challenges for the city of Detroit.  Specifically, they address job creation and economic investment in the area as key ways to revitalize the economy in a deindustrializing context, as well as critique the governance situation that has lead to many of the problems that we currently see in Detroit.     

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Somalia's Geopolitical Impact

Representatives from more than 40 governments gathered in London on Thursday to devise a new international approach to Somalia. 

 

The problems of poverty, famine, terrorism, environmental degradation and piracy in Somalia all intersect with the key issue of governance on the Horn of Africa.  Many in the international community are recognizing that these are not only local issues, but global problems that might require global cooperation to bring about effective local governance to the region.  

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World Bank eAtlas of Global Development

"The World Bank eAtlas of Global Development maps and graphs more than 175 thematically organized indicators for over 200 countries, letting you visualize and compare progress on the most important development challenges facing our world. Most indicators cover several decades, so you can see, for example, how 'life expectancy at birth' has improved from 1960 up through the latest year."  This tool should greatly enhance student projects as they will add more data, and see bigger patterns.  To go to the link visit: http://www.app.collinsindicate.com/worldbankatlas-global/en

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Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer

Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S.

 

This goes nicely with the carbon footprint data that was recently posted.  Although that was data aggregated at the national level and this is on the 'world realms' level, many of the same patterns are visible without the same specificity. 


Via syarifah dalimunthe
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Protests, Self-Immolation Signs Of A Desperate Tibet : NPR

Chinese authorities have tightened security around Tibet after a series of demonstrations by Tibetans demanding more religious and political freedoms.

 

How are China's renewed efforts to control Tibet and the Monks protests geopolitically intertwined?  How does this impact the region? 

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 10:39 AM

China has tightened their security around the Tibetan monestary and the monasteries seem to be emptying out. Monks have been setting themselves on fire in protest against Chinese repression. This is a sign of desperation from the monks.  

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The Observatory of Economic Complexity

The Observatory of Economic Complexity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a great graphic display of the economic products that the United States exports.  What makes this interactive display all the more valuable is that that you can slide the timeline to see the shifts in the economic sectors within the United States from 1962-2009.  How was the U.S. export economy changing on the global market?  What sectors were growing?  Which ones were shrinking?  How do these economic changes impact the U.S. geography?

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AAG Annual Meeting - 2012 NYC

AAG Annual Meeting - 2012 NYC | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a link to the AAG preliminary program for the meeting this weekend.  I'll be presenting Friday at 2:40pm  in th Social Media, Research and Pedagogy session (in the Gramercy Suite B, Hilton NY, Second Floor).  The title of my presentation is "The Social Media Classroom: Bringing Globalization to Geography Education."  I hope to see some of you there. 

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Redlining in 1936 Philadelphia

Redlining in 1936 Philadelphia | Geography Education | Scoop.it

 These are great images that shows the can build historical and geographical empathy for those that were discriminated against during the era of redlining.  These maps from the Home Owners' Loan Corporation mapped and shaped regions of urban disinvestment (but the maps were NOT widely circulated).  This example of redlining in 1936 Philadelphia, links you to primary source documents if you click on the map.  The documents are reports on the property values, resident demographics and descriptions of the residential zones.  For more on the Philadelphia redlining research project, visit: http://cml.upenn.edu/redlining/intro.html

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Economic "Creative Destruction"

Economic "Creative Destruction" | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Print newspaper ads have fallen by two-thirds from $60 billion in the late-1990s to $20 billion in 2011.

 

I'm sure we are all familiar with the fact that newspapers have declined as an economic force in the last decade as more people receive their information and news through online portals such as blogs, social media and online news sites.  This is an excellent (and timely) example to teach the concept of creative destruction: as jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created in new technologies, other jobs disappear.  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't causualties of this 'creative destruction' process.      

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3D Grass Globe Illusion at Paris City Hall

3D Grass Globe Illusion at Paris City Hall | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Today, we want to show you another wonderful 3D illusion which is installed in front of the steps of Paris's city hall.

 

Geographically inspired public art that is also a massive optical illusion makes me happy on so many levels.  

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The true cost of oil

The true cost of oil | Geography Education | Scoop.it
TED Talks What does environmental devastation actually look like? At TEDxVictoria, photographer Garth Lenz shares shocking photos of the Alberta Tar Sands mining project -- and the beautiful (and vital) ecosystems under threat.

 

This is a visually stunning portrayal of Canadian landscapes.   He shows incredibly gorgeous photographs of the ecosystems of the boreal forest, indigenous cultural landscapes and natural scenery.  This is unfortunately the backdrop for the impacts of industrial extraction of oil from the tar sands of the Athabasca in Canada.  Collectively, this makes for a jarring justaposition of environmental landscapes.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 7:59 AM

This presentation is very moving on the emotional side of the plight of Canada’s natural resources.  When it comes to oil production no matter where it is it will be dirty, messy and fraught with problems that impact the environment.  The idea that everyone wants oil but they don’t want to mess up their own country to get it is an interesting problem.  Frankly the more developed countries like Canada are more likely to mine the resources responsibly then a country that has little or no environmental protections.  This speaker gives a very impassioned presentation but he offers no alternatives to oil.  Getting oil from a country that has environmental protection laws is cleaner and better then getting it from a country that cares nothing for the environment; it is less accountable and more environmentally damaging to get it from somewhere else.  Pipelines are cleaner ways of moving oil as they seldom leak and don’t crash and spill.  The debate over oil and environmental responsibility will continue until a viable source of clean energy is created. 

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Power of Place

Power of Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore educational and professional development resources for teachers and classrooms on Annenberg Media's learner.org. Companion to the Annenberg Media series Power of Place.

 

Maquiladoras, outsourcing, migration and regional differences within Mexico are main themes in this video.  This is a resource of videos that many are very familiar with, but this is worth repeating for those not familiar with the Annenberg Media's "Power of Place" video series.  With 26 videos (roughly 30 minutes each) that are regionally organized, this be a great resource for teachers. 

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 9:59 AM

During this video you can distanctly see the differences between the outsourcing that Latin American had to do in order to surivive with their goverment the way it was and also how the mirgation came into play by which groups of people migrated to specific regions and what made them move there. Regional differences are also a major factor because of the regions and how they have progressed theought time and what will happen in the future.

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Old Maps Online

Old Maps Online | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a fantastic archive for historical geographer in search of old maps.  This database is has both a timeline to specify a time period and a map to search particular regions.  

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Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away

Nogales, Mexico: A Few Steps, and a Whole World Away | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A writer who has crossed many borders finds the one between Nogales, Ariz., and Mexico to be the oddest frontier of all.

 

Given that most of the articles concerning the border these days reflect on the policing of the border, the illegal flow of people, drugs or guns across the border, or the violence in the borderlands, this is refreshing change of pace.  Paul Theroux focused on the cultural connections that form, not in spite of the border, but because of the border and the cultural vibrance of Nogales, Sonora. 

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Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 19, 2012 10:21 AM
Everyone is always talking and writing about Mexicans crossing the border, taking jobs, and smuggling drugs into the US. It’s nice to find an article showing their humility and kindness to others. These people in this town just over the border are trying to improve it by adding security, school programs, and keeping their town clean.

I think there’s so much that can be learned from this article. As Theroux states, “the neighborhoods just across the fence are not representative of the town at large, which is a lesson in how to know another country: stay longer, travel deeper, overcome timidity.” So, while, yes, there are dangerous areas in Mexico, not every town is the same. Not all Mexicans are dangerous drug dealers who want to steal your job.
Jessica Martel's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:45 PM

cool

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USA National Gas Price Map

USA National Gas Price Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This visualization of gas prices by county in the United States is timely as high gas prices are not only impacting pocketbooks, but are also becoming political taking points for presidential candidates and this issue may drive policy.  This shows the regional variations in prices (so sorry to my California friends), but it is a great launching point for asking the questions: why are the prices for a certain commodity higher in one region than another?  What factors lead to the spatial differences in the relative economic value in one region over another?  Supply and demand works beautifully on a two-axis graph, but supply and demand happen somewhere, giving a simple chart added complexity since it's spatially contingent and we must make the assumption and caveat explicit.  

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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 12:22 PM
In an ideal world, gas prices would be $5 a gallon nationwide-with that extra $1.50 going to finding a reasonably priced alternative to oil-run vehicles.
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Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | Geography Education | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 

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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 12:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
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AAG 2012 presentation

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Percentage of Population Living in Poverty

Percentage of Population Living in Poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This interactive map shows national estimates of the percentage of the population falling below the poverty line.  That is a quite problematic situation to map, since the operational definitions of poverty vary considerably among countries.  Also, there are some counties without data (Central Africa, North Korea, etc.)  However, there is still considerable value to be gleaned from this map.  What regional patterns do you notice?  How will this map inform our understanding of migration patterns and political unrest?

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Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 4:26 AM

This map show that most countries in Africa and south America are suffering from poverty. The country suffering from the highest amount of poverty is Chad. it has 80% of its people in poverty and countries around Chad also experience high amounts of poverty. Many articles state that the government there is corrupted. i too believe that the government is corrupted. i hope that the government helps the people and not themselves. People are dying every minute in areas like this due to famine. there are many children who are left to fend for themselves and are abandoned at the very young age as their families couldnt afford to fill another mouth. i believe all this can end if the government does something for the people. 

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Among AP Courses, Geography and Environment Are Hot

Among AP Courses, Geography and Environment Are Hot | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geography and environmental science gain in popularity in the Advanced Placement program, while interest is waning in some languages.

 

Now is a critical time to continue the push for greater geo-literacy in the curriculum, to ensure that students have the foundations established for them to be successful in AP Human Geography before they reach it.   

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