Geography Education
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What's in a Name?

What's in a Name? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Pentagon has upset patriots by labeling the body of water between Korea and Japan in an exhibition depicting various battles fought during the 1950-53 Korean War as "Sea of Japan" rather than "East Sea."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Earlier this week I posted on whether a group of islands off the coast of Argentina should be called the Falkland Islands or Las Malvinas.  There is some geopolitical significance to which name you ascribe to particular places.  Does it matter if I call the sea to the east of the Korean Peninsula the "East Sea" and if someone else refers to this same body of water west of Japan the "Sea of Japan?"  For many years the Sea of Japan has been the defacto name internationally and South Korean officials have lobbied (quite successfully) to bolster the legitimacy of the name within the media, publishers and cartographers and other governments.  Last summer, a worker in the South Korean government's Ministry of Foreign Affairs requested that I share some resources that state South Korea's position(see also this 10 minute video), showing their commitment to this rebranding effort.  Also see this GeoCurrents article on the subject in 2012, after South Korea's failed attempt to get international recognition.


Questions to Ponder: What other places have multiple names?  What are the political overtones to the name distinctions? What are other tricky places on the map where distinct groups would label/draw things differently?  Is the map an 'unbiased' source of information? 


Tags: language, toponyms, South Korea, historical, colonialism, cartography.

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Justin McCullough's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:16 AM

I agree with Peter Kim and others that are fighting to have the name changed to the East Sea. The term "Sea of Japan" was used in colonial times of South Korea. Now that those times are long gone, it I can understand why South Korea would want to get rid of anything related to that time period. This actually reminds of something that I'm going over in my colonial history class; the Pueblo Revolt (1680). During this time Indians revolted against the Spanish colonizers oppressing them and taking away their traditions, forcibly converting them to Christianity. During their revolt the Indians destroyed many of the Spanish institutions, especially those related to religion. They destroyed churches and even defaced the statues of the saints, and returned to their traditional practices.

This article also reminded of Sri Lanka changing the its colonial name on Government institutions from Ceylon to Sri Lanka. This happened not to long ago. The Island's colonial name (Ceylon) was dropped when they became their own country in 1972. However, the name Ceylon remained on many of the Government institutions (e.g. Bank of Ceylon or Ceylon Fisheries Corporation). However, in 2010 the name was dropped for good.  

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 9:55 PM

(East Asia topic 10 [an independent topic])

{And finally a topic outside of China...}

Just as mentioned in a Scoop from a previous topic section, names can be viewed as more than a word which identifies a place. The context of a name can run very deep and be highly contentious. In this case "Sea of Japan" and "East Sea" are contenders for the official name of the body of water between Japan, Korea, and Russia. Sea of Japan is an older term with more of a history, which especially invokes mentioning of the Korean War. East Sea is a post-war term hopes to remove national tension form its name.

   Should officials really 'rename the wheel', or can the original name be accepted just because of its location and historical use? Or perhaps neither of these options, or even a national-level split as is currently the case?

   Personally, I see it as the difference between Aquidneck Island and Rhode Island (the actual island, of course), or even relatable to French fries vs. freedom fries. Physical things don't change just because their names do. In my view, perhaps everybody should just choose whichever they are more familiar with and comfortable using, while taking into consideration and expressing that their reference of a location is not meant to imply any political views.

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Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."
Seth Dixon's insight:

The recently revised Geography for Life standards have been aligned to show how geographic skills can be taught within the Common Core framework.  The National Geographic Society, in cooperation with the National Council for Geographic Education and the Network of Alliances for Geographic Education created Connections to be that link (for grade specific Common Core/Geography resources click here). 


So how is this to be done? This storymap shows ten great examples of maps that can be used as reading documents, one for each of the 10 ELA Reading Standards. 


TagsmappingEnglish, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:40 PM

Common core ideas

 

Duke No Limit's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:53 PM

wow very interesting

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | Geography Education | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Population programs can have have diverse unintended consequences.  Many couples in China who have lost a child not only face the heartache of loss, but have also lost their economic future since that one child was supposed to support them in their old age.  Some elderly parents have a child, but one that does not financially support them as the cultural norms of the past would have required of the children.  These 'orphan grandparents' are casualties in the changing cultural, demographic, and economic patterns in China.

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jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 5:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 25, 2015 11:04 PM

China's one-child policy has had a greater effect than slowing population growth and decreasing the labor force. Another widespread problem for parents obeying this rule is the loss of their only child and the devastation it brings due to the cultural importance of family in China. Ancestors are greatly respected and descendents mark a great life. After parents retire they rely on their children for support and their needs. When they do not have a child anymore, their whole life derails and they spend the rest of their days with a broken family that can never quite heal. In many cases, the parents are then too old to have another child and their life simply falls apart. Protests have been made in the past for similar situations, but the Chinese government has not yet fulfilled its promises to provide greater assistance to these parents or to change their policy.

 

This article relates to population and migration through the population policy of China and its drastic effects on family life and parents. This policy would be classified as anti-natalist because of its promotion of smaller families with less children. It discourages having children.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).

Seth Dixon's insight:

Religious traditions are interconnected and often share common roots and ancestries.  This stunning infographic is an attempt to visually reconcile these disparate strands of faith into one cohesive whole (the image above is far too small to do it justice, but I tried to show the image at various scales).


Tags: perspectiveculture, religion, culture, infographic, diffusion.

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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I first learned of the Pakistan's new animated TV series the Burka Avenger last week from an NPR podcast and eagerly wanted to know more.  Some are hailing the Burka Avenger to be Pakistan's answer to Wonder Woman, fighting for the rights of the oppressed.  There has also been a lot of criticism concerning the role of the burka juxtaposed with this heroine.  For many, they see the burka solely as a symbol of female oppression and feel that a heroine shouldn't be donning the clothing of the oppressed (my opinion?--C'mon, it's the logical masked outfit for a female superhero trying to be incognito in the tribal villages of Pakistan).  I find this pairing of traditional gender norms and clothing coupled with pop culture's superhero motifs to be a fantastic demonstration of how cultures mesh together.  Globalization doesn't mean all cultures are the same; we often see highly localized and distinct regional twists on global themes.


Tags: Pakistangender, popular culture, SouthAsiaglobalization, culture, Islam.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 2015 4:25 PM

A modern day Batman/Superman, Burka Avenger, with great graphics and an in-depth plot. The television shows the Pakistanis children watch are the same type of shows that I watched growing up, and the shows that the modern day children of today’s youth are watching. The cross-cultural relationship seems so different, but at the roots it is the same. The kids in this show have friends, pets, enemies, a hero, a conflict; everything that an American television show would feature.  Whether the kids are facing a bully, a school closure from a villain, or a life peril from another villain, there undercover school teacher is there ready and willing to save the day. Everybody needs a hero to look up to, so this show is great for the Pakistani youth. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:06 AM

I think this is wonderful.  It also reemphasizes the reality that all children are born without preconceived notions of what is right, what is wrong, what is good, or what is evil.  An American child might look at this and automatically think that the lady in the Burka is a "villain", due to American media and propaganda.  I can't help but think of the backlash that would surround this cartoon if they ever tried to put it on American airwaves.  

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Earth Structural Layer Cake

Earth Structural Layer Cake | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"One of their lessons [in a series involving geologic sciences] involved teaching the kids about the structure of the Earth. One of her friends came up with the idea of presenting a model of the Earth made out of cake. So my sister asked me if I could make a spherical cake with all the layers of the Earth inside it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I definitely don't have the skills to pull off this amazing cake, but I can certainly appreciate the hard work and the amazing teaching tool this cake is (tutorial and recipes for concentrically layered cake here).  Crafts are hardly fluff pieces; my daughter last year had to create a craft representing the inner core, outer core mantle and crust.  She loved working with fruits of various sizes (blueberry was the inner core, followed by strawberry, kiwi and an orange with the peel being the crust) but the lesson stayed because of the visual and tactile connection that she had with the project.


Tagsphysical, fun, art, K12.

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Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's comment, September 1, 2013 10:30 PM
Year 8 Unit 1
Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 7, 2013 7:58 PM

I think that this came out awesome! I definetly don't think that I would be able to pull something like this off. However what I found intersting about this was that it was like a cake map. Students were able to get a visual about what the earth's core is like. It visually shows them all the different layers of the earth. Just by visually seeing the cake like this will help a lot more kids to remember this lesson. Also by the baker putting the countries in their accurate locations makes this cake even that much better. They are veiwing a map and they don't even know it. I think this cake is a great tool to use to show students just how the earth is actually made up. By allowing the students to visually see it also makes it more likely for them to remember the material. Viewing maps can teach so much, which is why I think this "cake map" is an awesome way to teach and get the kids attention!

Michelle Winemiller's curator insight, January 22, 2015 11:07 AM

project option we currently do for this unit

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Political and Economic Geography Presentations

Political and Economic Geography Presentations | Geography Education | Scoop.it

6 conference presentations on various economic and political geography topics given at NCGE 2013 as a part of the APHG strand.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The last two mornings in Denver, CO there was a series of presentations of economic and political geography given in front of a capacity crowd.  6 of the educators have agreed to share the slides of their presentations with the broader geography education community and you can access them all here.  See also this livebinder with resources for teaching APHG to 9th graders (which can be adapted to older students as well).  This was a fantastic professional development event and we are all thankful that they were willing to share these resources.  


Tags: APHG, NCGE, political, economic.

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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:42 AM

These conference presentations show the importance that geography plays in the roles of both politics and economics. The impact that geography has on economics is a huge one. You could argue that geography is used as a scale in some instances in economics because of the land structure and locating were certain areas are.If you are able to locate certain things or find out where you want to put certain things in a place geography allows you to do so using economics.

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Ken Jennings at NCGE

Ken Jennings at NCGE | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The keynote address of the NCGE conference in Denver was given by Ken Jennings of Jeopardy fame and the author of Maphead (and yes I was super excited to meet a fellow map geek and  BYU grad).  "Everything is better with maps,"  Jennnings said, and geographers often try to say that we do more than just look at maps, but mapping technologies should be embraced as a way to help make geography be the placed-centered part of other academic disciplines.  He also mentioned the great advantage and challenge we have with mapping technologies in building greater spatial thinking skills for our students today.  One the one hand, maps are so interactive today that the application are endless.  On the other hand, if we allow our GPS devices to do all of the spatial and navigational thinking for us, our minds will lose those skills.  As we use (and refrain from using technology) appropriately, spatial thinking and mapping can only make everything better. 

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Louis Culotta's comment, August 4, 2013 12:58 PM
that' looks like a very cool conference to go to.
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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the map above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to podcast versions of this article as well, one by NPR and a much more detailed one by Orion Magazine.


Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?


Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

It relates because we talked about this map in APHUG class, and it was in the textbook. The population trend is moving Southwest.

This is interesting for next year's APHUG students, because they get to see a population trend right in the US! It's a good article to think about why population trends are the way it is.

2) migration

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What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like?

What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Seth Dixon, a Rhode Island College geography professor and the coordinator of the RI Geography Education Alliance, gave the keynote address at the Thinking Geographically about International Issues 2013 summer institute, in a talk entitled What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like?

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was delighted to speak at Brown University this summer as a part of the Choices Program's summer institute.  This is the video of that talk (as well as the hyperlinked slides) that is my modest attempt to tackle such a monumental question in my profession.


Tags: geography educationteacher training.

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Alejandro Restrepo's comment, August 4, 2013 12:22 AM
Great work
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:25 AM

This is a great video and sa reminder of how we should be approaching our teaching of the Australian Curriculum. 

Jarrod Dodds's curator insight, April 13, 2014 8:49 PM

In this video, Seth Dixon demonstrates a profound knowledge of geographical concepts . More importantly, it's his delivery and approach to teaching those concepts.

 

Watch this video and respond to the questions.

 

1) Highlight what methods the professor uses to engage students effectively.

 

2) Why do you think those methods are important, particularly for the subject of geography?

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Just what is Geography?

Just what is Geography? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I'm a geographer. Yes, I study rocks, but I'm not a geologist. I consider weather and climate when I study people--but I know the environment doesn't determine a culture's development. Hydrology and oceanography are cool. Please don't feel threatened just because I know about economic, political, and cultural globalization. I read Darwin, Lovelock, Marx, and Tuan--all in geography classes. The newspaper calls me a local historian. My neighbors think I'm an expert on roads. I hang out in cemeteries. I've served in government--far more successfully than the self-proclaimed 'business experts.' Capitals? I really haven't memorized them, thank you. But I can think spatially and holistically. I love my planet. I'm interdisciplinary. I'm a geographer."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I you haven't 'liked' the Church of Geography on Facebook, you really should. These geo-sermons are worth the huge investment of a simple click.  

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nativemedia's comment, September 25, 2013 12:27 AM
excellent
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Geography in the News: World Fisheries

Geography in the News: World Fisheries | Geography Education | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM DECLINE IN OCEAN FISHERIES The world may be running out of places to catch wild fish.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I recently posted a New York Times video about the rapid rise in industrial fishing and the production of Talapia.  Even with the rise of aquaculture as a major source of seafood, the world's oceans are still depleted.  As the world's population rises, many folk cultures with their roots in small fishing villages have transformed into primarily urban societies, but these urban societies still have a strong cultural preference for seafood and consume at levels that are not sustainable.    


Tags: environment modifyfolk culturesconsumption, water, physical.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 5, 2013 6:42 PM

Useful for consideration of Fish as a resource in the topic Natural Resource Use in Global Challenges. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:11 PM
its scary to see how much fishing grew over the pat years due to the growing population
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Overtime as the population has increased you can see on the map that areas have been over fished. This has caused people to move near the water to fish and it has created some jobs for them. This could be bad becuase as the population increases the fish will decrease due to the over fishing. 

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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The Hottest Day On Record ... In Siberia?

The Hottest Day On Record ... In Siberia? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Did the Arctic region break a heat record?
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Siberian Times is reporting a record heatwave for towns such as Norilsk that are both North of the Artic Circle and built on permafrost.  While on the global scale the climatic shifts are quite alarming, there are many in Siberia that see global warming as a mixed bag.  In what some would have you believe is an unrelated news item, the North Pole is experiencing the formation of large meltwater ponds


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, climate change.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, July 28, 2013 4:25 PM

Global warming...no...Siberia is supposed to be a cold dark place...according to my Dad!

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Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Understanding global statistics is nearly impossible if you can't grasp just how large of a quantity 7 billion is.  This set of infographics are a great resource for teaching some of basic global demographics. 


Apparently the latest internet craze is a 40 maps mix-tape.  See the Washington Post's 40 Maps that explain the World for an interesting, eclectic compilation of maps as well as 40 maps they didn't teach you in school from Bored Panda and 40 maps that help you make sense of the world from Twisted Sifter. 


Tags: statistics, populationinfographic, K12.

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:11 PM

If the World was 100 People shows the statistics of the world as in smaller proportions allowing them to be easily visualized.

Some of the graphics divide the people into regions and nationalities mainly as Formal by continents .

Virgínia Mareco's comment, May 15, 7:04 PM
https://radiotherapydictionary.blogspot.pt/2016/11/standard-deviation-or-s.html
Virgínia Mareco's comment, May 15, 7:04 PM
https://radiotherapydictionary.blogspot.pt/2016/11/standard-deviation-or-s.html
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The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River

The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River | Geography Education | Scoop.it

" A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution)."


Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fantastic teaching image, especially if you teach within the Mississippi River Basin.  However, my main purpose in showing this image is to demonstrate the potential of the National Atlas' new Streamer application.  Streamer is a new way to visualize and understand water flow across the United States. With Streamer you can explore major streams by tracing upstream to their source or downstream to where they empty.  A watershed is a critically important region and many have little idea about how they are connected to other places within a watershed; this tool ccan help alleviate some of those problems. 


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:20 AM

INland water environments

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 4, 2013 9:40 PM

Land use is different around Mississippi River basin.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:28 PM

The Mississippi River flows down the east side of the United States. Since the river is so long it has many streams that expand off it it as well. As you can see in the picture the red parts are the sections where the water has branched off the Mississippi River. It takes up almost all of the middle section of the United States. 

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Argentina renews Falklands claims

Argentina renews Falklands claims | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner renews her claims for sovereignty of the Falklands at a UN Security Council meeting.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Are they the Falklands or Las Malvinas?  It's not just a simple linguistic translation but also a statement of territoriality and geopolitical recognition.  This article nicely summarizes the current situation. For a great teaching resource on the historical ebbs and flows in this longstanding dispute between Argentina and the UK, see the second slideshow in this series of  AP Human Geography talks that was given at NCGE earlier this month. 


Tags: Argentinaborders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:10 PM

I think that countries trying to unite and make claims is sort of like going to a bad college party in a station wagon with people that you might not like, don't like you, and are not like you... At least in the case of the USA.  As for Argentina, well I hope they're not as ravishly divided as the united of the constituents of America.  I don't really have anything good to say about this country... I have been physically and psychologically abused by police, damaged and violated by medical establishments, and I'm really sick of other people acting like they have the god-given right or my permission to treat me less than pleasantly.  How does this relate to Argentina requesting sovereignty? Well, I relate my personal experience to their situation in that they might be better off sovereign than being operated on by deranged fugitive doctors or beaten up by cops in bad relationships... so to speak.  For a lack of sovereignity would pose negative things that might befall their people.  I think that there is a greater chance for greater things to happen to them if they do it alone, rather than being told what to do, or being thought through and puppetted by other countries!

Joshua Mason's curator insight, February 19, 2015 12:59 PM

Often times, the thoughts of the Days of Empire are long gone. Most people see World War I as the boiling over of competition for colonies. As Europe gave most of their colonies up in the mid-20th century, some of them still stayed in their colonists' hands. The Falklands are that shining example of the UK's Empire days and it's understandable why they would want to hold on to them. Not only are they a decent naval base for operations in the Americas and along the Atlantic, they remind Great Britain that she was (and one could argue still is) a world power on the sea and land. No country wants to give away land voluntarily. Argentina sees these islands as her's and wants them back while the United Kingdom still holds claim. The UK also has the backing of the inhabitants when a referendum was held. Only three of the residents on the Falklands voted to split from its over seas ruler. What do you do when a country right off your shores demands your home back while a country thousands of miles away wants to keep you? It was a recipe for disaster in the 80's and still proves to be a point of tension in the 21st century.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:10 AM

The controversy of the Falklands continues. You would think that someone would have proposed viable solution to this issue by now. The Falklands war back in the 1980's remains one of my favorite skirmishes in history. The whole issue is throwback to the colonial era when the sun never set on the British Empire. In the years following the Second World War, the Empire collapsed. Today there is virtually nothing left of that once great empire. Great Britain should let one of its last vestiges of Empire go. There is no need for the British government to administer an Island in South America. The days of imperialism and colonialism have long since passed.

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Is This Land Made For You And Me?

"Lyrics to 'This Land Is Your Land' from WoodyGuthrie.org. And if you can't watch the video for some reason, here's a transcript."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video that I originally found on Upworthy shows that even classic songs of Americana that might seem jingoistic may have had a subversive beginning.  I never knew there was a final verse to this Great Depression era song that references iconic cultural landscapes; know that I've heard it I see why it isn't taught to school kids, but I wish it was.   


In the shadow of the steeple I saw my people,
By the relief office I seen my people;
As they stood there hungry, I stood there asking
Is this land made for you and me?

Tags:  poverty, place, USA, landscape, culture, music.

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Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video and article briefly show the reasons behind the current tension between Spain, NATO allies and fellow EU members.  The deeper, underlying issues though are all fundamentally rooted in the complex local political geography.  As an exclave of the UK on a peninsula connected to the Spanish mainland that controls access to the Mediterranean Sea, there is naturally going to be friction over this unusual political configuration. Spain, in what the chief Minister of Gibraltar calls "sabre-rattling," is flexing its muscles and considering using their border and airspace as a political leverage.  Spain is upset that Gibraltar has created an artificial reef in waters that their fishermen use.  Spanish fisherman have recently condemned the escalating political rhetoic.


Questions to Ponder: Why are both parties politically and culturally invested in this piece of territory?  What challenges are there for a small exclave when neighbors aren't friendly?  How does Spanish and British suprantional connections impact this issue?


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, Spain, Europe, autonomy.

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megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:59 AM
unit 4
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Population Density

Population Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."

Seth Dixon's insight:

At NCGE this week, I was pleased to hear a presentation from Alexander Murphy, a giant in the academic world.  He shared this interactive map from Derek Watkins, which is the best map I've ever seen to teach global population distribution patterns.  It is removed all extraneous information and allows the user to focus on the areas of heavy settlement and limited population.  The map can show regions that are settled at densities from 15 to 500 people per square mile; the changes at various densities are visually staggering and powerfully telling. I've shared some other maps that would work very nicely together with this in a lesson on global population settlement patterns.   


Tags: density, populationvisualization, mapping.

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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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T3G Lightning Talks

T3G Lightning Talks | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Earlier this summer the T3G participants had an informal lightning talk session with many people sharing their favorite educational, geospatial or professional development tools.  I was amazed as some of the incredible projects these fantastic educator are involved with and I didn’t have time to properly credit all the speakers, but this was the best I could do to capture some incredible projects.  Below are some of the links:

Seth Dixon's insight:

GIS and GEOSPATIAL in EDUCATION


EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 3, 2013 11:12 PM

good refereces and resources.

techsavvygirl's curator insight, August 4, 2013 9:00 AM

inspiration for those who enjoy geospatial learning tools

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 8, 2013 7:15 AM

Recursos y referencias para la educación geoespacial

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Iran's 'Jerusalem Day': Behind the rallies and rhetoric

Iran's 'Jerusalem Day': Behind the rallies and rhetoric | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Iran's annual al-Quds - or Jerusalem - Day, denouncing Israel, is as much an expression of policy as ritual, writes BBC Persian's Siavash Ardalan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Iranian government officially holds a 'Jerusalem Day' every year to spout anti-Israeli rhetoric.  I want that to be the dropback for this TED talk where Israelis and Iranians share pictures of tolerance, respect and love for each other on social media.   


Questions to Ponder: How can your country of origin shape your cultural perspective on other societies and reaffirm a national identity?  In what ways can individuals resist and subvert the official state-sanctioned narrative?  How is social media changing grass roots geopolitics?


Tags: Iran, Israelsocial media, political, Middle East.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 4, 2014 8:39 PM

The people of Iran gather to celebrate Jerusalem Day. Each year millions of people come together to express their hatred towards Israel and support towards Palestinians. They rally and some people including politicians give speeches. Speeches by President Ahmadinejad even included the denial of the holocaust.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:19 PM

This day is pro-Palestinian and is a must-go-to event for politicians. Any politician that wants to be heard or even listened to in the future must make their way to this parade of protests and Iranian rituals.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:07 PM

considering that this is an annual holiday, and considering that there are the television shows that depict the Jews as bent on world domination and as using the blood of christian children to cook bread during Passover, i don't think we should potentially giving them nukes.

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Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic Fracking | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking', is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside."


Seth Dixon's insight:

This website, Dangers of Fracking, is clearly not produced by the oil industry.  What I enjoy about this resource is that as you scroll down, it adds more context to the environmental issues and geographic factors.  This type of website promotes holistic thinking and an interdisciplinary approach to complex problems.  Why am I leery of the fracking companies and what they say?  This is why


Tagsenergy, resources, environment, environment modify, ecology.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:37 PM

Hydrographic Turing puts people in  safety and health risks. Because the water is contaminated and because of the oil spills, blow outs, and fires. They put chemicals into the ground in order to make cracks in the earth to collect natural oil, but they use people's land in order to collect the oil. People are complaining about these industries because they now have to buy water every month instead of getting it from their sinks or wells. Not to mention some houses have already blew up or caught on favor thanks to hydro fracturing. They need to put a stop to this, at least do it on land that is not being used and far away from people.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:07 PM

The development of gas is important for energy but there are health and safety risks with cracking in neighborhoods. Quality of air and water is important for survival. Nature matters and people matter, they need to find a middle ground. 

Kuzi's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:42 AM

The visual example explained the procses

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This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix

This Guy's Never Met a Map He Didn't Want to Fix | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Just not always for the better: "I've deliberately designed maps that are deliberately horrible to look at, and succeeded."
Seth Dixon's insight:

All maps are compromises; the Mercator projection preserves shape but distorts size, and so on.  What about sacrificing locational accuracy to preserve the aesthetic design or readability?  Just some things to think about as you peruse these redesigned subway maps.  


Tags: visualization, transportation, mapping, NYC.

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Don't Kill Geography

Campaña para impedir que el Ministerio de Educación de Chile borre la Geografìa del Currículum Escolar.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In many countries, geography education is in peril.  In Chile, the Education Ministry is rewriting the curriculum and many are afraid that Geography will be squeezed out (sound familiar?).  This Spanish-language video is a statement of why geography is fundamental, practical and a important as a lived experience.  You can also find "Min Educ: No Mates La Geografia" on Facebook and YouTube.


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APHG Graduate Certificate Program at Elmhurst

APHG Graduate Certificate Program at Elmhurst | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Join us for an informative session on the newest program available to AP Human Geography teachers of any level. We'll look at the data behind the program's development as well as the program components and options available.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm pleased to announce a FREE Webinar about the AP Human Geography Online Graduate Program at Elmhurst College on Aug. 7 at 8:00 PM EST. Sponsored by GIS Etc., the webinar will answer questions about the program and what is included in the professional development experience.  


Scholarships have reduced the costs by $600 per course for all NCGE members who are public school teachers. 


Please register for the FREE webinar here.
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