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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate (this is what maps are made for!

 

What is the geography of chocolate like?  There is a dark side (no pun intended) to the production of cocoa in many places such as West Africa. 

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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 6:53 PM

Very cool map. I have never really paid attention to where my chocolate came from before. 

ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 8:33 AM

Interesting for our KS1 chocolate topic.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 2:43 PM

We all love chocolate.  We all love diamonds and jewels.  In western worlds, these items are easily come by in grocery stores and elsewhere, but what got them there was a challenge.  People in poorer tropical regions around the world worked to get the raw goods of these delicate items we all enjoy.  The payout difference is immense from cocoa to chocolate.  It is sometimes a very crooked market where if it wasn't for the hard working people who get the raw ingredients, chocolate as we know it wouldn't be the same.

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Low-income countries are a cigarette's best friend

Low-income countries are a cigarette's best friend | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Between 1990 and 2009, cigarette consumption in regions of the world like Western Europe dropped by more than 25% - but that is only one side of the coin.  Historically, cigarette consumption has been a privilege to the rich and high-income countries. Now, with those countries understanding the risks of cancer and the dangers of smoking, the number of smokers decline. But in the past twenty years, for example, the use of cigarettes in the Middle East and Africe has increased by 60%: "Among the 14 countries where 50% or more of men smoke all but one country (Greece) are classified as low- or middle-income."

 

"As consumption rates continue to increase in low- and middle-income countries," the ACS report reads, "these countries will experience a disproportionate amount of tobacco-related illness and death."  In 2009, China consumed 40% of the world's cigarettes.

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The Carolinas Work to Clarify Their Borders

The Carolinas Work to Clarify Their Borders | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As a team works to restore the North Carolina-South Carolina border to the original 1772 lines, some worry about the consequences.

 

Old maps and borders where often determined by local landmarks like trees, rivers, roads, fences, etc.  Trees get uprooted and over time, rivers will wend their way down slightly different paths and the informal old borders get called into question.  The border between North and South Carolina, traversing through swampy forested area was imperfect and now that they are trying to rectify it, some South Carolina residents face the prospect of needing to be North Carolina residents...not a small thing when you consider the utilities, government documents, taxes and voting. 

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Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still Divided

Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still Divided | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Twenty years ago this week, the Bosnian war began with the siege of Sarajevo, the longest in the history of modern warfare. The siege ended more than three years later, leaving 100,000 dead — the worst atrocities in Europe since World War II.

 

Ethnic and political conflict led to the disintegration of Yugoslavia in the 1990s.  This NPR podcast is a good recap that shows the devolutionary forces of ethnic, religious, cultural and political differences that led to tragic violence and ethnic cleansing. 

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Derek Ethier's comment, October 10, 2012 10:59 PM
It's unbelievable that ethnic crimes continue to be committed in the world today, even after the atrocities performed by Hitler. When Yugoslavia collapsed, the power vacuum left behind caused hundreds of thousands to lose their lives. In Africa even in the present day, these kinds of things continue. It makes you wonder what kind of a world we are really living in.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:54 PM

These stories are never pleasant.  It seems Europe after World War II and the fall of the Soviet Union were left in a strange middle ground.  With so many cultures, religions, languages all on one continent, its not hard to believe that Europe has been the stage of so much conflict all throughout history.  People are and always have been intermingling between countries.  Many of the countries in Europe are easy to travel throughout, such as a car or bus ride which may only take a few hours in some cases.  This gives easy access for immigration in which history shows that people try to flock to opportunity or to where there are people similar to them.  These patterns can sometimes be unwelcoming to current citizens and lead to violence and cleansing in extreme cases, all because of disagreements based on beliefs and traditions.

After all the wars fought, looking at Europe as a whole is tricky.  Though the countries all have political boundaries and jurisdictions, the lifestyle and what goes on within the borders can be very segregated.  Even in the 21st century, the divisions of people in the same country, holding the same citizenship, shows that things aren't always as good as they seem.

Devon marzo's curator insight, February 6, 9:37 AM

This article show political because the population is protesting against the government 

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What can you do with geography?

We all know that geography is important; but what can you do with it? As students across the country prepare for the 2012 National Geographic Bee, we've expl...

 

This is essentially a commerical for Google Earth, but don't let that overshadow the overriding message of the essential nature of geography in education and the usefulness of geographic and spatial analysis on the job market. 

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Where is my Milk From?

Where is my Milk From? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Find out which dairy your milk comes from!


Seth Dixon's insight:

Too often we have heard the answer "from the grocery store!"  With more thought, the farm would be the next answer, but what kind of farm?  Which farm? Where is it coming from?  All you need to arm your students to make the commodity chain more personal is the code on the carton and this link, and they are on their way to exploring the geography of industrial agriculture (more likely than not).  This site is designed to help consumer become more aware of the geography of diary production and to get to know where the products that we are putting in are body are coming from.  My milk (consumed in Cranston, RI) is from Guida's Milk and Ice Cream from New Britain, CT.  So, where does your milk come from?

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 23, 2012 7:41 AM
I have the Guida's as well as Garelick farms, which is made in Franklin MA. an interesting tool.
Kim Vignale's comment, July 23, 2012 4:52 PM
This is a great tool to find out where your milk is coming from and it also helps you decide which brand to buy to support local farms and reduce carbon emissions from the transportation of these dairy products to your local supermarkets. I think this tool help promotes local farms which is also a great way of supporting local businesses.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 11:39 AM

I loved reading about this site and there idea. its so ture that too often we say "from the grochry store" when asked were this cheese or food product is from. However acutlly knowing that animal that produced the food, before it was packed and shipped out, is a very cool things that technollagy in the 21st century  is allowing us to do. Its funny when i was on my study abrod trip in mexico and we bought some goat cheese from a rancho there,, i tried to ask how he made it, but he thought i ment who made it and he walked me over and pointed to the goat that he had gotten it from. 

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Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke...

 

Where is Coca Cola produced?  Some products are bulk losing some are bulk gaining in the manufacturing process.  Coca Cola and their containers represent bulk gaining products.  Although not the focus of this video, what is the geography behind where these factories are located?  How would this geographic pattern change if this were are bulk losing industry?  What are examples of bulk gaining and bulk losing industries?  Why are glass bottles not manufactured in the United States? 

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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 3:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
megan b clement's curator insight, October 31, 2013 8:40 AM

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:57 AM

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion. 

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Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

Urban ecology: what economic forces created the rationale for building Venice?  What environmental factors are currently threatening it?  Will economic or environmental forces win out? Location: do the economic advantages of a location outweigh the environmental liabilities of the location?  How do these competing factors influence the development of a city?  For additional information on this story see: http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-venice-hasnt.html

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:47 PM

The famous city in Italy is sinking, and quickly.  It seems that the transient opportunities of a transient town are like that of other areas exposed to natural inclemence- such as New Orleans, and earthquake zones.  Sooner or later, places that are exposed to disaster will become inhabitable, and possibly abandoned.  When I hear of this city sinking, it makes me think of the Titanic, and how people should likely jump ship out of this situation, before the whole city 'goes under.'  I also think of marshy areas that would not be well-suited for development and inhabitance, and it seems that there is a history in the town that united people to live there in spite of the abundance of water.  Some of my ancestors were from Italy, and I wouldn't want harm to come to their homeland, but it really makes me wonder why they chose such a place to live...  It seems likely to me that the mere fact that it was sinking was not really considered much back then;  they were not as realistically concerned about the longevity of the city in the long run, than they were about the 'now' and the time at hand.  This reflects many facets of humanity and the hedonistic lifestyles that accompany many humans.  Humans that live for today and forget about tomorrow are doomed to live a life of sorry.  Humans that live for tomorrow and not today are out of touch and fail to seize the day.  Humans that live for today but remember tomorrow are the masons that build stairways to new lands for their descendents, and along with that, myriad new possibilities for positive opportunities.  I think some of the wisdom of Italy was put into its architecture and structural design, so that we might remember- we are dying in this life, just as Venice sinks, but we should live life as best as we can, and pave the way for future generations.  Like so, the dumping of wastes into the ocean seems tiny at first, but accumulates over many generations and will leave many ocean species dead, and harm the overall functionality of the Earth as a whole.  Let Venice be a reminder.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 6:27 PM

So not only is Mexico City sinking, but Venice is as well, and five times faster than we thought at that. If the heart of an urban, sprawling city becomes completely destroyed what changes will be made to the outlying areas? Will they break up into multiple, smaller districts each with a central area? Where will the rich who used to reside in the heart move to?

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

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AAG: Changing Planet

AAG: Changing Planet | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Association of American Geographers (AAG) is now Beta-testing a new website to address some of the issues from the NRC report, “Understanding the Changing Planet, Strategic Directions for the Geographical Sciences.” This site, builds on the idea that geographers can communicate truth in ways that other disciplines don’t offer, or “the geographic advantage.”

 

The four aspects the geographic advantage (as conceptualized by the AAG team) are:

1.  Relationships between people and the environment

2.  Importance of spatial variability

3.  Processes operating an multiple and interlocking geographic scales

4.  The integration of spatial and temporal analysis

 

To ensure that this advantage is harnessed, the AAG prepared 11 modules within these 4 categories of key issue facing the world:

--Environmental Change

--Sustainability

--Rapid Spatial Reorganization

--Technological Change

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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 8, 2012 7:39 PM
I liked the "peace index" video which ranks US states in terms of peacefullness through a number of variables, such as the availibility of small arms.
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The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt

The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Atlantic CitiesThe Real Boundaries of the Bible BeltThe Atlantic CitiesReligion in America has an unmistakable geographic dimension.

 

We often hear people in the deep South describe there state as the buckle in the Bible Belt.  This map of religiosity in the United States shows a clear Bible Belt with other interesting patterns (with some pertinent political ramifications in an election year). 

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We Need to Talk About an Injustice

TED Talks In an engaging and personal talk -- with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks -- human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America's justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial...

 

The Trayvon Martin shooting has been a very polarizing social issue; many athletes, actors and even politicians have donned hoodies in solidarity to speak out against racial and social injustice.  This is a good opportunity to discuss race in the classroom, beyond the Trayvon Martin incident.  I find this particular TED Talk heartwarming (and fairly non-controversial although he hintsstrongly that he is against the death penalty), while still casting the light on injustices in the United States, specifically looking at the racial differences within the criminal justice system.      

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Votes and Vowels: A Changing Accent Shows How Language Parallels Politics

Votes and Vowels: A Changing Accent Shows How Language Parallels Politics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It may seem surprising, but in this age where geographic mobility and instant communication have increased our exposure to people outside of our neighborhoods or towns, American regional dialects are pulling further apart from each other, rather than moving closer together. And renowned linguist William Labov thinks there’s a connection between political and linguistic segregation.

 

"Labov suggests that it’s these deep-seated political disagreements that create an invisible borderline barring the encroachment of Northern Cities Vowels. When he looked at the relationship between voting patterns by county over the last three Presidential elections and the degree to which speakers in these counties shifted their vowels, he found a tight correlation between the two. And the states that have participated in the vowel shift have also tended to resist implementing the death penalty.

 

"Social identities are complex, and can be defined along a number of different dimensions like class, race, or ethnicity. Not everyone feels that politics are a part of their core identity. But I suspect that political ideology may become an anchor for accents to the extent that large social groups collectively identify themselves by their political beliefs. According to Bill Bishop, author of The Big Sort, this is happening more and more as Americans voluntarily cluster themselves into homogenous, politically like-minded communities."

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Perpetual Ocean by NASA

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio — the same team that recently brought us an animation of the moon as it will appear from Earth for each hour of 2012 — has also released a stunning video called “Perpetual Ocean,” a time lapse of the world’s ocean currents as calculated by the ECCO2 computational model.

 

This is an stunning visualization of ocean currents.  Thanks for the suggestion! 

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 18, 2012 6:16 PM
Neat video. I just did a small art project which involved a globe and referred to Van Gogh's Starry Night. As other posters mentioned- this video is similar to Van Gogh's painting.
Michelle Carvajal's comment, December 11, 2012 6:08 PM
I actually own a Starry night Van Gogh painting Beth. I agree with what you say!
Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 6:10 PM

This video is pretty awesome! I love how it shows the different ways that the currents move around the continents and in mid ocean. How are we not to expect for natural phenomenoms to be unpredictable when our oceansa re the same. i would have never expected to see so many idfferent flows and currents but they do exist. It gives you a look into how are planet works and also gives you a chilling thought of how easily a ship would get lost in deep ocean waters. - M. Carvajal

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Nesting Cans Activity

Nesting Cans Activity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This blog post outlines an excellent craft activity designed for K-6 students to teach the concept of scale. 

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Melissa Marin's comment, April 9, 2012 11:26 AM
How cool!
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Are the Richest Americans Also the Best Educated?

Are the Richest Americans Also the Best Educated? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The latest data from the U.S. Census´s American Community Survey paints a fascinating picture of the United States at the county level. What are the connections between place, education and earning power?  What patterns are what you would imagine? Why?  Any shocking patterns that emerge from this dataset?   

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50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster

50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster | Geography Education | Scoop.it
50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster: Today marks the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. ...

 

A haunting gallery that displays the effects of environmental and political mismanagement. 

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Ashley Raposo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 4:51 PM

Absolutely frightening to see a city so empty.  To only imgine what could have been in Chernobyl today if this nuclear disaster didn't happen.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 12:03 PM

The pictures are breathtaking.  What was once a modern and prosperous area is now completely devestated and basically irreparable for hundreds of years to come.  In some of the pictures it is possible to see the haste and desertion of buildings and rooms which gives a sense of fear and panic that the people experienced.  There is surely still so much that can be explored, but the radiation limits people and the danger of the area is hard for civilians to be within the boundaries of Chernobyl.  Places like this show how drastic the rise and fall of the Soviet Union really was.  Similar to mono-towns in Siberia, these areas were set up for people to flourish and become successful, but as history went on and disasters ensued, the great empire came crashing down.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:51 AM

These photo's are rather gripping.  Many of the images seen here are of objects that have not moved or been touched in 25 years.  The entire population of Pripyat had to pack their bags and leave all in an instant. The chaos that must have ensued after the nuclear meltdown must have been haunting. Pripyat will remain like this for years to come, and one can imagine what it will look like in 25 more years.

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Turn This Parking Lot Into a Village

Turn This Parking Lot Into a Village | Geography Education | Scoop.it

If we built village of small streets today, where would we locate it?

One great candidate would be a park-and-ride lot, which is parking located next to a subway or commuter rail station. Such parking gets some to use public transit who wouldn’t ordinarily...

But that’s just the problem: the people who use park-and-ride lots don’t ordinarily take transit. The reason they have to drive to a train station is that they don’t live near it. That’s why building new neighborhoods next to transit (called transit-oriented development in planner lingo) has become popular in the last 10 years.

If we built a small streets village next to transit station, then we’d have a whole village of people who could use transit for all of their trips longer than a walk or bicycle ride away.
There are countless park-and-ride lots to consider, but we’ll look at just a couple. Greenbelt Station is located in Maryland at one end of Metro’s Green Line, which goes through Washington, DC and back out to Maryland. If you’ve ever hopped a ride on the Bolt Bus from New York City or the bus from BWI Airport, you may have visited this station...


Via Lauren Moss
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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.

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chris tobin's curator insight, March 22, 2013 1:23 PM

Here is an article March 2013 updating the latest in Wales

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-politics-21683771

 

"Silk Commission:  Mixed Reaction Over Devolution Power" 3/16/2013 BBC

 

     Since 1997 there have been many changes in the devolution processes Westminster still holds the most governing decisions but it seems that the UK taxpayers do not want their money to go to other countries for public services. 

Railing is a big issue since there have been alot of plans for improving infrastructure in transportation to build up the economy.  This will be particularly interesting to follow in the news.

     Liberal Democrat Leader Kirsty Williams stated a need for a new model of devolution  with clear definitions and the Conservative Lib. Dem. coalition's 114 page document to the Silk Commission states policing, broadcasting, and energy projects should remain under Westminster but to devolve teachers pay and rail franchises.

 

 

 

    

    

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 6:51 PM

The devolution of the United Kingdom is taking place at a legistlative level right now- if/when will Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland vote to actually secede? The article made mention that people in Britain are starting to get angry that they are subsidizing programs in Scotland that the English pay for themselves. What are the benefits to being a part of the United Kingdom? What's the best balance of power for all involved?

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:21 PM

This shift can reshape the countries in many ways, financially, and the over all quality of life. A place will do better with connections than standing alone. This may help with international relation issues and build new relationships. When places depend on one another it can reshape the Country. It can also help with investment and jobs. 

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The 21st Century Classroom - Digital Geography

Amber Hill EDU10713 Curriculum, Assessment & New Media Emerging Pedagogies...

 

This student-produced video (from Southern Cross University in Australia) has many good insights...especially the tagline "we need to prepare our students for the future, not the past." While all new technologies do not improve on tried and true practices, some are worth putting into our classes as the resources become available to us. Also this video outlines numerous resources and how they can be used in the classroom. Who says we can't learn from students?

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Syrian Refugees

Syrian Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Syrians by the thousands are fleeing the violence in their home country and seeking refuge in neighboring countries.

 

Demographics and Politics: This photo essay is a varied glimpse into the refugee camps that have emerged from the Syrian uprisings against the Assad regime.  How are politics and migration connected?  Can you think of other examples where we see similar patterns? 

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International Fast Food Consumption

International Fast Food Consumption | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This cartogram shows the distribution of one major fast food outlet brand (McDonalds's). By 2004 there were 30,496 of these McDonald's worldwide with 45% located in the United States.  The next highest number of these outlets are in Japan, Canada and Germany.

 

The world average number of outlets of this one brand alone is 5 per million people. In the United States there are 47 per million people; in Argentina and Chile the rate is a tenth of the American rate; the rate in Indonesia, China and Georgia is a hundredth of the American rate. In all the territories of Africa there were only 150 outlets: mostly in South Africa.  What does this say about consumption, economics, development, globalization and branding? Search http://worldmapper.org for more excellent cartograms. 

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Wind Map

Wind Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.  Super cool!!

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Ken Morrison's comment, August 30, 2012 5:25 PM
That was cool. Thanks for sharing. I have a new fun tool for virtual storm chasing. I'm not as adventurous as I used to be. Is there any chance that there is an international version? We had a big typhoon in Asia this past week. Crazy weather.
Luis Sadeck 's comment, September 24, 2013 6:01 AM
Very crazy this map! One good application from technics of collect of data and building of map enviromental.

Thanks for sharing
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Fossilized Raindrop Dimples Add to Mystery of Ancient Earth's Warmth

Fossilized Raindrop Dimples Add to Mystery of Ancient Earth's Warmth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Pumice-like cratery indents formed by ancient raindrop splats are adding to the mystery of why the adolescent Earth was warm enough to host rivers and oceans, despite the dim sun of the day. Thanks to fossilized impressions from rains that fell down on Africa 2.7 billion years ago, the "Faint Young Sun" paradox is getting curiouser and curiouser.

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Congressman Bobby Rush Kicked Off House Floor For Wearing Hoodie

http://www.thegreatrepublican.com Illinois' Rep. Bobby Rush (D) was removed from the House floor Wednesday morning after donning the hood of his sweater — an...

 

The 'rules' about clothing, place and social context are culturally and politically institutionalized. Where can you wear what clothes, and when does that change? Should it change? The clothes literally made this particular speech, since it was about the criminalization of cultural clothing norms within racial and economic groups. Should he have been thrown off the floor? What would you have done?

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 2:46 PM

“Life is more than a piece of clothing” Bubby Rush.

 

I do understand why congressman did what he did, but I don’t agree with him because he as a congressman, need to set an example to our youth. The house as other institution have rules that should be respect it, there are different way for you to protest if you don’t agree with certain issue. Imagine if show up to my job naked, I would be fired right way. Like my mother has always say “there is a place and time”

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10 Famous Clock Towers From Around the World

10 Famous Clock Towers From Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
10 Famous Clock Towers From Around the World - http://t.co/0jQRve4x (via @Twitt_Geography)...

 

This is a fun collection that captures the architecture of an era that valued large public timepieces as symbols of modernity and progress.  If we aren't seeing the construction of new grand clocks, what are 21st century symbols of modernity and progress in public spaces? 

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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 3, 2012 7:52 PM
Globalization has received a negative reaction from groups of likeminded individuals that feel as though increased interaction s will threaten the solidarity of their culture. Likewise other may feel as though the line between modernization and the “West” is too thin to make a clear distinction. However in these images many of these clock structures have a very clear cultural distinction to them such as the crescent on top of the Al-Bait Towers in Saudi Arabia. As modernization continues to alter the architecture of places around the world these building are likely to retain familiar cultural characteristics that can be recognized. Besides skyscrapers I think other symbols of modernization can be seen in chain stores and restraints like Starbucks or McDonalds as the services vary from place to place finding a medium between the combination of familiarity and strangeness.
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 8:56 AM
Clocks are sign of modernity, industrialism. The clock is a an important cultural symbol for modern workers, the hours/minutes/day are more important than the seasons are/were for more agricultural societies.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 4, 2012 6:23 PM
Clocks embody an 18th and 19th century vision of modernity, one based on the technology of the day. Today, they are a icons but today they are superfluous. Will they continue to be a major part of public places? Some like Big Ben in London are so famous that the must endure but I don't see new cities thinking that a massive clock tower would be a needed addition to the city.