Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have many more questions than answers after listening to this podcast.  Presumably, most governmental agencies during emergencies are seeking to assist the greatest number of people with limited time and resources; would this court ruling change that mandate?  How will this impact urban planning in the future?  Just how much can plans in times of emergency account for assisting the disabled?  Do you think the City of New York was negligent? 


Tags: disasters, NYC, transportationurban, planning, podcast.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:35 PM

I am disabled, and while I am not in a wheelchair, I would implore the politicians to come up with accommodations for those that are, or have other severe forms of disabilities.  I damaged my brain and spinal cord in an accident that cost me some of my psychological functions, as well as a lot of the fine motor skills in my hands and body.  I remember what it was like before my accident, and I know that there was nowhere along the line that I asked to be disabled.  The people in wheelchairs, or the people who cannot evacuate themselves from areas of danger, are people that should in fact be prioritized, not left behind, when it comes to evacuating during emergencies.  In class our group discussed that the average able-body person should be prioritized during evacuation, but I kept thinking- what if something happened to them? What if they broke their leg during a flood evacuation?  Should they be left behind?  I would suggest that rather than answer these James Wan-like instances of moral quandary, we prepare for them and come up with access for the handicapped to be evacuated- in such an instance where NO ONE would have to be prioritized OR left behind.  That is the only fair way to deal with this sort of idea, without leaving anybody behind.  I have had dealings with people with disabilities, and a guy I know that is in fact wheelchair bound, is one of the most productively creative people of his age that I have encountered- wheelchair or not, he has produced, written, and directed two full length feature films before his 22nd birthday, one of which has screened at the Sundance Film Festival.  I had the privilege of working with him during some photoshoots, and I was really quite inspired by what he does, enough to pursue film-making on my own.  I feel that people today don't really care until something affects them.  Negative thoughts against those that prioritize against the disabled in events of emergency do not enter my head; rather, I feel that there must be something we can work out now, in a time of no immediate emergency, that can save us all...

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:34 PM

In my opinion I do not think it was all of New Yorks fault that some handicapp people could not get the help they needed. There are a lot of people in New York and not everyone could make it out even if they were not handicapp. I think these people should have a back up plan as well just incase. You could have a family member, neighbor, or friend come and help you and give you a ride.  

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:01 AM

This subject is the definition of a gray area matter. Of course you want to treat everyone equally and have everyone come out of a sotrm unscathed, but to do soo you have to tip the scales so much that it becomes unfair for un handicapped people. Sure New York could of done this better. But also some neglegence has to fall on the citizens. If your and elderly handicap person and know a major storm is comming you should try to evacuate immediatly, you dont need the news to give you the A Ok to go. Yes the City should have gave a heads up atleast 10 hours in advance so people could better prepare better but the citizens have to be away of their own situation. This comes down to an ancient survival theme the survival of the fittest were if you weak and not smart you die off simple ass that.

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National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality

National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the end, rank falls away
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Veteran's day many will go to cemeteries to remember fallen soldiers.  These are secular sites, but still sacred space to many.  The sanctity of these places are intentional and considerable planning goes into the spatial layout and design of the cemeteries.  Enjoy the day off for Veteran's Day, but don't forget to remember.

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Expert's comment, November 11, 2013 6:42 AM
Hi, I'd be happy if you visit my site? http://oyunskor.toretto.org
Caren Izzo's curator insight, November 11, 2013 11:09 AM

Veterans' Day today.  Thank a vet for their service.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 11, 2013 12:44 PM

If you have never visited a veterans cemetery, I think it is important to go and just visit even if you do not have a realtive there.  These men and women gave their lives for us in one way or another.  No matter what creed, what belief or which religion they followed all are treated with same care.  If you really want to see an amazing site goto a US Military Cemetery overseas.  These gaves are maitained by the locals, French, Italians, Ducth, etc.  They keep them neat, clean, with flowers and make sure our soldiers that died for them are not forgotten.  The one overlooking Normandy is amazing.  I have had the privledge to visit the US Cemetary near Rome and the feeling you get...well undescribable.   Take a look here for a view of these cemeteries.  http://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries/index.php

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The 11 American nations, in one map

The 11 American nations, in one map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Red states and blue states? Flyover country and the coasts? How simplistic. Colin Woodard, a reporter at the Portland Press Herald and author of several books, says North America can be broken neatly into 11 separate nation-states, where dominant cultures explain our voting behaviors and attitudes toward everything from social issues to the role of government.

“The borders of my eleven American nations are reflected in many different types of maps — including maps showing the distribution of linguistic dialects, the spread of cultural artifacts, the prevalence of different religious denominations, and the county-by-county breakdown of voting in virtually every hotly contested presidential race in our history,” Woodard writes in the Fall 2013 issue of Tufts University’s alumni magazine. “Our continent’s famed mobility has been reinforcing, not dissolving, regional differences, as people increasingly sort themselves into like-minded communities.”

Take a look at his map.


Seth Dixon's insight:

What do you like about these regional divisions?  What do you think about this map is inaccurate?  Here is an NPR podcast interview with the author of the book and map. 

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:54 PM

The first thing I noticed about this map, and really liked, was that the nations extend past the borders of the United States. That allows these nations to reflect the similarities shared among large regions. These cultural, economic, and political regions reflect something that extends beyond the political borders of any one country. Southern Arizona is very similar to Mexico just like Northern Idaho is similar to Canada. The region labeled the Far West lumps together many different areas, likely because of the similar geography. However, there is more diversity in these areas than the map shows, for example there is a fairly big difference between the culture and political beliefs of Nevada and Utah, and western New Mexico is very different from Montana.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 12:31 PM

The way this map has been broken up is rather accurate. With the Greater Appalachia, stretching through West Virginia and into northwest Texas. Also, El Norte being separated due to the linguistic differences that have always been around that area.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 6:47 PM

This article was very interesting because it gave you a different way to look at not only the Unites States but the North American continent as well. I never realized that this continent can be broken into 11 separate nation-states. These 11 different divisions all represent and explain the different cultures or view points of the people living in them. The divisions can be a result anywhere from voting choices, social issues, religious beliefs, or just that particular type of community. I live in the Yankeedom. Northeastern states value education and are more comfortable with government regulation versus other areas. I was unaware that within the El Norte region, southwest Texas and the border region is the oldest and most different in America. Areas where independence was valued more had higher levels of violent deaths rather than the areas that had more government interventions.

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Guide to Earth Explorer for Landsat 8

Guide to Earth Explorer for Landsat 8 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Landsat Data Continuity Mission is now Landsat 8, and that means images are now public (woohoo!). NASA handed control of the satellite to the USGS earlier this year (May 30, 2013), and calibrated imagery is available through the Earth Explorer. Unfortunately, the Earth Explorer interface is a bit of a pain, so I’ve put together a guide to make it easier.

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you have been afraid to download remotely sensed images, this is a very-user friendly, step-by-step guide on how to download Landsat 8 data (and many other geospatial datasets)  using Earth Explorer from USGS.  


Tagsremote sensing, geospatial.

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Sharrock's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:36 PM

Looks like a cool tool for mapping activities.

Chris Cividino's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:09 AM

The Landsat program is an essential tool for geographers when they are studying GIS. Without this data, Google Earth and many of the other mapping programs we love so much would not be possible.

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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map from a Geography in the News article shows that Quinoa has historically been grown almost exclusively in the highlands of the Andes Mountains.  This was a localized food source for generations but this new global demand has increased the economic possibilities for Quinoa growers.  At the same time, local consumers that have traditionally depended on cheap Quinoa to supplement their diet are now effectively priced out, as stated in this Al-Jazeera article


Questions to Ponder: What modern and traditional agricultural patterns can we see in the production of Quinoa?  How have global and local forces reshaped the system?


Tags: agriculture, food production, foodglobalization, South America, folk cultures, culture, Bolivia.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 2015 10:10 PM

Quinoa appears to be originated as grain crop for edible seeds in parts of Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and along to Andes Mountain. However, they increase the crop value as it spreads to other areas of the world such as Europe and United States. One thing that I wonder is that if the production is going to be popular in any region other than South America but manufacturing regions started on eastern United States and they spread overseas to Europe. I wonder if production of Quinoa will spread to other continents. Believe it or not, it has partially spread to small parts of southwestern Europe.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:20 PM

Quinoa will be a staple for generations to come and the countries of Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina would do well to provide all the assistance to the farming community in their respective countries. This product is like New Age rice, it provides multiple benefits to health conscious consumers such as protein, fiber, and a "full" feeling when consumed. Any recipe that calls for a rice base can incorporate Quinoa just as easily and it tastes great. being a bit of a health freak, I use Quinoa in my diet and it works.

While the success of the grain has made it less accessible price-wise to those who grow it, it should provide for a greater economic benefit for years to come, lifting a population from near poverty levels to hopefully one of a strong and vibrant middle class.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:43 PM

Quinoa has been grown in the high mountains of the Andes for decades and has been a localized food for the population. As their health benefits became known in to the global community, the demands for them increases. This made it difficult for the locals to find cheap Quinoa, which is normally eaten in their diet. I feel that it is unfair for the locals to have seek new source of food alternatives now that their healthy Quinoa will become more expensive as the demand for it goes up.

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Geographically Yours

Geographically Yours | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If an urban population demands the freshest vegetables, they should be produced within a 24-hour field-to-table delivery zone.  What, therefore, should be the highest and best use of agricultural land between Taiwan's two largest cities, Taipei and Kaoshiung, only 200 miles apart?  The Lord of the Rings, a.k.a., Johan Heinrich Von Thünen, has the answer."  [2011]

Seth Dixon's insight:

This image and analysis comes from the blog "Geographically Yours" by Don Zeigler.  He's a well-traveled cultural geographer and has been collecting great teaching images over his career and is now sharing them on this site.  These pictures are great discussion starters and bell ringers to start the day.


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG, images.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:13 AM

This image communicates the importance of agriculture and marketplace relativity. in an area where transportation is minimal and people happen to be more more poorer then need to supply needed resources in a timely manner is very important. Farmers and resource providers need to be close enough geographically. This image shows an outside clothing and food market were people get to shop around and choose in a convientent ways there most needed items. The umbrella suggests rain as the child and other shoppers are being covered. This outdoor market doesnt necessarily suggest poverty but a wide range of population given a convenient location to buy goods quikcly and efficiently. The market may be located in a urban downtown area or also a village central area. Regardless the location, and goods provided shows the valuable commodities need to be provided in a manner, freshest possible for delivery.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, November 13, 2013 8:40 AM

It is said that locally grown food can have more nutritional value than organic if the latter comes from thousands of miles away. If you had to choose, which would you rather have, locally grown or organic? 

Megan Becker's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:30 PM

Summery: This article shares the importance and relevance of the Von Thunen model, even in modern agriculture. It also touches on urban population demands and how it effects the size of the Von Thunen model, bring the last level much closer to the city center. 

 

Insight: I think that with urban demands of fresh foods, it is absolutely correct to have to shift the Von Thunen model. Of course, in its time the model was correct, but with the growing agribusiness, it's no longer 100% accurate. 

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17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video original spotted in an Open Culture article is a real gem for any historical geographer with a love for London.


Tags:  virtual tours, EnglishLondon, urban, historical, visualization.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:53 AM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 6:41 AM

2G Contemporary Period

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The Geography and Literacy Connection

The Geography and Literacy Connection | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What do you think of when you hear the word literacy? Depending on what you teach, chances are geography is not the first thought that comes to mind. But believe it or not, geography and literacy naturally share many similarities. And you can deepen students’ learning in both geography and literacy when they are integrated in the curriculum."

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Ana Melo's curator insight, November 4, 2013 9:41 AM

Geography provides a lot of fundamental knowledge and gives you also a sense of place, which I find very relevant in times of globalization where you belong everywhere and nowhere simultaneously.

Chris Cividino's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:06 AM

Understanding key terminology in geography is paramount to demonstrating deep knowledge of geographical concepts.

Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:45 PM

In this report, a researcher describes the relationship between geography and literacy on educational terms. When combined, these two very similar topics would provide major benefits to a child curriculum in school giving them a better insight on geography through literary concepts. These certain concepts help kids better recognize relationships within graphs and charts that give valuable geographic information. This article helps prove geography as a field of inquiry based on its relations with other subjects that help enhance the knowledge among the children in any school curriculum. 

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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a glimpse into the BBC's "Don't Panic-The Truth about Population" which will be airing November 7th.  If you have never seen his TED talks or his Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data. 


Tags: gapminder, population, poverty, development.

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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

ATTENTION !
Get Paid To Enlighten African Youth On How To Use The Internet To Grow Rich ! Re: Ref:Jobs Are Moving Online, Lets Us Help You Acquire The Skills Of 21st Century and Help You To Be A head Of the Masses in Getting Online Jobs!
http://www.firstandfastcapital.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=690&Itemid=623

Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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Changes in the APHG course

Seth Dixon's insight:

The APHG course outline and description was changed over the summer and the 2014 test will reflect these changes.  So what are the changes?  I've created this slideshow  to show what the changes are and add links to my site that might be thematically useful.  The hyperlinks don't work in the first 4 slides so I duplicated the unit 1 slides at the end of the document (you can download this as a PDF file or the Powerpoint file as well). 


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 31, 2013 10:31 AM

HUGGERS...this will affect YOU! Take a look!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:16 PM

Take a look HUGGERS!

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:29 PM

course info-- 2 AP conferences in the last year and this was not mentioned!

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Youth TechCamps

Youth TechCamps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The AAG has requested that I share this with geography educators and I'm delighted to do so because this is fantastic program; please encourage students to apply for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.  "This program aims to provide opportunities for youth to learn more about online geospatial technologies and how to apply them in service to their communities, while gaining a deeper understanding about different places and cultures of the world.  It is conducted by the Association of American Geographers (AAG) with funding and support from the US Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Youth Programs Division. The MyCOE partnership has actively led more than ten years of youth leadership programs, finding solutions to sustainable development challenges in local communities using geographic concepts and tools, while connecting with each other globally." 

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 31, 2013 12:11 PM

This is an amazing opportunity for high school students to network build relationships and glean knowledsge and learn ways to plug into their community and their world around them. This allows students to learn more about geographic technolgies to understand mapping and climate changes and would be an amazing opportuinty for students to find their vocation and find ways to plug into people who work in their communities and it seems though that the school is only available in Bolivia Panama and South Africa. We need more students that are more aware geograhically and able to meet the needs in a changing global climate.

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This magazine feature is filled with resources for teaching urban geography and development.  In this feature you'll find 8 videos, articles, maps and images discuss some of the geographic factors that have created megacities and the difficulties that they pose for future development.


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities, National Geographic.

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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:38 PM

I thought this article was good as it gave information on how the world as we know it is growing and cities are popping up everywhere. Developing countries are seeing a large increase in growth and with that comes the growth of cities. With this, more megacities will be born and hopefully the quality of life increases with life in cities.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:09 AM

mega cities

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Assessing Online Sources

Assessing Online Sources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tweet from Earth Pics (screenshot preserved for when it gets taken down).  Retweeted over 1,000 times in the first hour.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a real island...well, sort of.  It is an island off the coast of Thailand (most certainly not Ireland) and there is no castle on the top.  Photoshopping and easy file sharing make it harder to assess the validity of online resources (this fantastic digital manipulation is the work of Jan Oliehoek).  Most students start their research with online sources.  This isn't to pretend that that I've never mistakenly assumed that some online content was accurate when it wasn't true; I think we all have.  I think that it's an important conversation to have with our students so they can be more critical consumers of online information and use some geographic skills to assess the quality of that information. 

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:57 AM

students need to be very careful in the type of sources that they used to glean information. People can manipulate photos and suggest things as fact when they are completetly made up. It is understandable that Wikipedia can not be used as an entireyl reliable source because people have access to add whatever they want to the content matter. Photoshop and other online tools can be used to trick people into beleiving certain things. This photo claiming to be from ireland is really from Thailand is a small island but the castle itself on the top os photoshoped and the image was retweeded like crazy within the first hor. wee must check our sources and make sure that we are getting good primary or at least good secondary services from legit websites.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 5:08 PM

This just shows that you can't believe everything you see on the internet. In this picture it is said to be of an island in Ireland but in reality it is in Thailand. People believe what they want to believe.

morgan knight's curator insight, October 8, 2014 1:00 PM

Before reading this article, I assumed that I was capable of telling fictional from factual information apart. But now, after having my eyes opened, I realize that the internet can truly play you like a puppet. From this article, I've now learned that there are more ways than one to judge the authenticity of a site. one such way is to search for an "original" copy of whatever it may be that you're researching. If none pop up, you have the true article.

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'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week’s powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn’t getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.


"Its absolute bedlam right now," says Richard Gordon, head of the Philippine Red Cross.  “There's an awful lot of casualties, a lot of people dead all over the place, a lot of destruction.”


According to the BBC, a huge international relief effort is underway, but rescue workers have struggled to reach some towns and villages cut off since the storm.


Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, Philippines.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 8:50 AM

Even though the death toll resulting from Typhoon Haiyan is around 1,000, it is expected to reach 10,000.  International aid will hopefully help cities such as Tacloban City recover from this storm.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:16 PM

This is insane. It has affected millions of people and and even killed people. Its good that so many people are going to help though.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:05 PM

With so many of the citizens living on the coast, a large typhoon like this completely destroys most of the country. When this much devastation happens all at one time it takes a very long time to recover.

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Why is Geography Education so Important?

Seth Dixon's insight:

This commencement speech from the President of the American Geographical Society highlights the importance of geographic thought and geo-literacy for college graduates.  I share this because (to quote Summer Howarth), "geo-literacy isn't really optional." 

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Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:09 PM

Love the question - if you read the articles some good stuff in there. Please share your opinions about Why Geography Matters

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:04 AM

This is a good read for anyone who is going to be a social studies teacher. 

I am not sure that I would recommend this in my classroom but all teachers can benefit from this. 

He introduces geography as a way to connect with the world. Learning geography adds perspective and insight into the rest of the world. In geography we can pose thought provoking questions to students that gets them to start thinking differently than they do now. 

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Geography Poster

Geography Poster | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you remember the elements of geo-literacy as defined by National Geographic, all the themes are at the bottom of this chart...hmmmm.

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, November 9, 2013 7:17 AM

Poster sobre la enseñanza de la geografía

Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:14 PM

Really wished I had created this. Thanks Durman District school board and Charles E Gritzner. (Apologies is surname is incorrect - difficult to read on the poster.)

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:39 AM

can be used for the inquiry process

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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This Washington Post article got me thinking about the geographies of supply chains.  The growing spread of the informal economy (a.k.a.-illicit trade, black market, etc.) has created opportunities for exploitation.  Many argue that free trade was created this power differential between the laborers who create these mass-manufactured products and the global consumers.  These critics argue that fair-trade, not free trade, with lead to sustainable economic growth and minimize social injustice.  Here is a NY Times article about how Mauritania is now confronting it's slavery past and present


Questions to Ponder:  What economic and cultural forces are needed for slavery to thrive?  What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today? How are your spending habits part of the system?


Additionally, this TED video (archived on scoop.it here) is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the global labor system. 


Tags: labor, economic, class, poverty.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:51 PM

This article has to do with unit 6 because it deals with development.This article explains how 30 million people work as forced labors, forced child soldiers,  forced brides and many other forced things. The map illustrates spatial patterns on economic and cultural factors on where the people enslaved are. The map shows that India is 1.1% enslaved.People say that fair trade and not free trade will lead to sustainable economic growth and lower social injustice. Two questions asked by the article is what realistically can we do to lessen slavery in the world today, and how our our own spending habits part of the system. The article also includes a video on some of the ways the slaves are treated poorly .

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Create Your Own Map

Create Your Own Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States and Canada."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The map above represents where I have been (green) and where I have lived (orange).  Super easy, anyone can use this site to create a PNG file that maps out North America (maximum of 5 colors, including white).  For more on how to create your own, read here.  Canada, Alaska and Hawaii can be included as well.    

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Charles Adami's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:52 PM

Students color code states involved in expedition. Louisiana Purchase , and US circa 1803.

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:40 PM

I took the liberty of using this site which was linked on my Professor's page to create my own map of travels within the United States! Green represents states which I've spent many nights, amber for states which I briefly passed through, and red for states I've never been to at all. I didn't include the map for Canada as well, but I've been to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario primarily. I'm very into the idea of travel and intend to visit as many places as I can in my lifetime, but I have focused much of my journeys for the future into foreign countries. This map gave me the hint that I might want to focus homeward a bit more.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:40 PM

http://vsm.defocus.net/img/vsm-28fc2e56c17b6506f2405817cce289c4.png This link is a picture of my map. It was divided by different colors. Red was for places you have not seen. Amber was for places you have seen some and maybe slept there a couple times. Blue meant that you have been there a fair amount of times and green meant that you spent the most time their and slept there on multiple occasions. Unfortunately, almost my whole map was the color red. I haven't been many places. The only places that I have consistently been to are Florida, New York, and Massachusetts. Connecticut on rare occasions and of course Rhode Island was the number one place on my map. I hope to one day turn all those red states into green states.

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(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages

(Serbo-)Croatian: A Tale of Two Languages | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What language is spoken in Croatia? Croatian is now the 24th official language of the European Union, but there are disagreements about whether it’s a distinct language or just a slightly different dialect of Serbian. Serbian nationalists believe that everyone shares the same language, “Serbian”. But many Croats persist in making their national language as distinct from Serbian as possible. Listeners will discover how politics is intruding on language, and how it is changing the map of linguistic patterns in unexpected ways."


Tags: language, Croatiapolitical, podcast, Maps 101.

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CCRES's comment, November 6, 2013 4:06 AM
Baška tablet , Croatian: Bašćanska ploča, pronounced is one of the first monuments containing an inscription in the Croatian recension of the Church Slavonic language, dating from the year 1100.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:03 PM

This part of the world has been so mixed up for so long. Each country wants their own identity, language and name but the borders are continually changing. Although these fights seem petty to me (an American) I am sure they mean quite a bit to the people living in these areas. National identity is very important to humans in general. Where we come from is the basis of who we are.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:51 AM

Languages are sometimes a mystery to countries but mostly has to do with who's occupying these countries and where the countries are located.  Croatia is only a few countries away from Serbia so the fact that the language they speak may/not be close to Serbian is no surprise. Migration and other factors contribute to the language developed in specific countries.

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Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If all the ice in the world melted, we wouldn't have a post-apocalytic scenario like Kevin Costner's "waterworld," but  it still would have an enormous global impact.  This interactive feature highlights the locations of places that would be submerged in the most extreme example of hypothetical sea level changes.  What would some of these changes be?  

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Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:15 PM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

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How Many Countries Are There?

Seth Dixon's insight:

What makes a country a country?  There isn't just one definition that is universally excepted as to what a country is; that make the first question even harder to answer.  Exploring these terms though is incredibly geographic and highlights some of the lesser known but fascinating places that are mired in geopolitical quandaries.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, CGP Grey.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:44 AM

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:44 AM

193....except........

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Maldives

Maldives | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Maldives is a small country in the Indian Ocean composed of 1,200 islands.  Virtually every spot in this country is under 8 feet in elevation.  Pictured above is the capital of Malé, which has the largest population (explore these islands on a variety of scales).   


Questions to Ponder: What physical forces and processes account for the presence of these islands in the Ocean?  In a geological time scale, what does the future hold for these islands.  What would be the main economic assets of the Maldives?  What would be the main economic and environmental concerns of this country?


Tags: density, sustainability, economicenvironment, environment adaptclimate change, urban ecology.

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:54 PM

The creation of the Maldives was a evolutionary process that was created with hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. However most of the 1200 or so islands are disappearing. As many of these islands have been created and built upon, the soils are losing their strength. Now we have a process of erosion not only from rain but also from the sea waves. As this eats away at the islands they are getting smaller and smaller and unless they start bringing in artificial land area they will someday disappear.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:39 PM

The Maldives Islands were created by Hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. Many of the one thousand islands that are there are slowly disappearing. The islands are being destroyed by rain and from sea waves that crash onto the island itself. Soon the land, just like Kiribati will disappear because they just keep shrinking in size more and more. Their economy revolves mostly around tourist money and parts of the islands have been highly developed for high end tourist marketing.  

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 4:33 AM

Honestly a nation like the Maldives would only be possible with today's technology. the lack of resources, land and linking landmass would have made it stuck in an era with villages at best. The modern country if you ask me is also a disaster waiting to happen. Their cities are right on sea level. A single tsunami or storm would devastate them never mind rising sea levels. I just think they are acting unsustainable and their growth without lack of native resources will lead to their nations ultimate failure. While I wish these people success their islands are also eroding due to reefs so geography is pretty much against them at every turn. In the future hopefully a solution to these problems can be found but until then this will likely be an area that will have to be evacuated in the future like many others.

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Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?
Seth Dixon's insight:

One county commission discribed these political movements thus: "It's grounded in the legitimate feeling that if you're marginalized by geography, it's easy to feel neglected by the central government."  The political division between urban and rural citizens can lead to pockets of the population feeling as though the state government ignores your and the surrounding communities.  It took the Civil War to separate West Virginia from Virginia, and while many may want to be in a different state, it's not happening simply because there is grassroots support for greater local autonomy.  Hypothetically, let's say that many new states are generated; what consequences might come of this?  Would it leading to further gerrymandering?      


Tags: political, conflict, devolution, autonomy, bordersgerrymandering.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 2014 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

According to the World Economic Forum (WEF), Scandinavia is the place to be.  This interactive map uses data that was compiled from an index to measure gender equality in health, access to education, economic participation and political engagement.  The four highest ranked countries in the world, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden) are all in Scandinavia.  Thanks to the Guardian Datablog, you can download all of the data in a spreadsheet to map on your own.  This interactive map is excellent, but a more expanded series of maps concerning gender (in)equality in the world regarding the status of women can be found on the WomanStats project page. 


Tags: gender, mapping, statistics, development.

 

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xavia's comment, April 10, 2014 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 29, 2015 8:30 AM

Summary- This map shows the equality of genders through their economic participation,  health, and access to education. In many poorer places you can see there is a much greater gender gap than in places like scandinavia where there isn't much of a gap at all. I

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one of the main subjects was gender. This chloropleth map shows the relationship between states and their equality among genders. It is easy to tell that in most undeveloped countries there is a much larger gender gap than more developed ones.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:37 AM

Gender Inequality Index-

This article explains the places and locations of gender inequality, and how most of this is densely kept in Africa, where most men are more powerful than women. It also shows how in more developed countries, their is gender equality, and with it better economy.

This article shows gender inequality index by the map and information displaying how gender inequality is located more in developing countries. And gender equality is placed in developed countries.

 

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A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”


I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.

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Mary Rack's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:11 AM

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching -