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A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World

A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Want to know where the poor live? Look at where the light isn’t.


"Satellite photos of Earth’s artificial lights at night form a luminescent landscape. But researcher Chris Elvidge of NOAA and colleagues from the University of Colorado and the University of Denver realized that they could also illuminate something much darker: the magnitude of human poverty. By comparing the amount of light in a particular area and its known population, they realized that they could infer the percentage of people who are able to afford electricity and the level of government spending on infrastructure development. This allowed them to extrapolate levels of human development—a measure of well-being that includes such factors as income, life expectancy and literacy."

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Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is a primer for those that have never seen HDI data.  This interactive map with HDI data is for those already acquainted with the HDI, showing the HDI number as well as the ranking. 


Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.

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Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:38 PM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:24 AM

HDI

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   


Tags: Bangladesh, water, pollution, poverty, squatter, planning, density, South Asia, development, economic, megacities.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"
Seth Dixon's insight:

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  


Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.

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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.

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The Spread of AIDS

The Spread of AIDS | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A handful of AIDS cases were first recognized in the U.S. at the beginning of the 1980s. By 1990, there was a pandemic. In 1997, more than 3 million people became newly infected with HIV.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The spread of AIDS/HIV since the 1980s has varied greatly over time and space.  The red lines represent Sub-Saharan countries and the dark blue line on this interactive is the regional average of Sub-Saharan African countries.  The regional trend was on the rise at the end of the 20th century, but is now on a slight decline (but still an major impact on the continent).  Countries such as Botswana and Zimbabwe have made some significant strides in limiting the spread of AIDS (Zimbabwe is the country that 'peaked' in 1997 and has had the steepest decline).


Tags: Africa, medical, development, infographic, diffusion.

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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:36 PM

Lack of education, social stigma, and poverty all play into the role of the spread of HIV in the sub sahara African region. This is a stoppable disease, but only with understanding of how it is passed, and education on how to stop the spread. Condoms, monogamy, good hygiene around bodily fluids and education on intravenous drug use are the only ways to slow the progress of AIDS.

 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:07 PM

you always hear about the aids problem in africa but this graph really puts it into context and you can see how huge of a problem this is. obviously better doctors/education is needed in these places to halt this pandemic

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The Middle East’s Surprising Appetite for Oil

The Middle East’s Surprising Appetite for Oil | Geography Education | Scoop.it
CFR experts examine the science and foreign policy surrounding climate change, energy, and nuclear security.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Most everyone knows about the importance of Middle Eastern oil to the global economy and how that impacts geopolitics.  What isn't well-known is that the Middle East's own demand for oil has been increasing as their wealth and standard of living has been rising.  This chart does not show the amount of oil consumption, but the "energy intensity."  This is the amount of energy (often oil) used to produce a unit of GDP for a country's economy.  


Questions to Ponder: How will this change oil-producing countries economic development in the future?  How does this make us re-assess these economies?  Does this impact how we think about climate change issues?

 

Tags: energy, resources, Middle East, development.

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Seth Dixon's comment, December 12, 2012 3:07 PM
In essence, this is measuring "how many miles per gallon" your economy is getting.
geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:37 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"Most everyone knows about the importance of Middle Eastern oil to the global economy and how that impacts geopolitics.  What isn't well-known is that the Middle East's own demand for oil has been increasing as their wealth and standard of living has been rising.  This chart does not show the amount of oil consumption, but the "energy intensity."  This is the amount of energy (often oil) used to produce a unit of GDP for a country's economy.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How will this change oil-producing countries economic development in the future?  How does this make us re-assess these economies?  Does this impact how we think about climate change issues?"

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:49 PM

Many people are well-aware of the Middle East's important part in the world oil market, but many fail to realize that this region consumes more oil than any other. Government subsidized oil prices combined with a rising economy spurring increased population growth and development makes parts of this region thirsty for petroleum. Cars are becoming more popular and as areas develop, electricity is being produced by the direct burning of fossil fuels. Meanwhile, countries like Saudi Arabia continue producing massive amounts of oil. This natural resource is what is going to shape this region in the upcoming years, providing major economic development that may trickle down to the people. 

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Global food crisis

Global food crisis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Climate change, changing diets and a growing global population has pushed food security to the top of the international agenda.


Food problems are fundamentally geographic.  Understanding local economics, agriculture and development all play a critical role in contextualizing place-based shortages.  This interactive media guide highlights where these issues are the most problematic. 

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 12:39 PM

Neo-Malthusian point of view?

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.


The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:58 PM

You can see in this woman's face that the years have been hard for her living as refugee. Although this seems like National Geographic giving themselves a pat on the back it is important to remember that this women became a national symbol for refugees and yet her life did not improve and furthermore she had no idea that her picture was so well known.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 2015 6:36 PM

I never would have imagined the "Afghan girl" being alive. It's amazing how National Geographic was able to catch up and speak with her and photograph her. This demonstrates the pure professionalism and global outreach national geographic has. 

One of the things I am most thankful about is that I do not live in a war torn society. Being separated from my family, forced to flee and become a refugee is a horrid way of life that I know I would struggle to endure. Some Afghanistan people have been doing this for over twenty years. 

One time I was having a discussion with my friend. We talking about America and the westernized part of the world. He and I agreed how lucky we were to be born in America. We were born white males in the United States of America. We could have been born a woman living in Iran or Iraq, or even as a little rural Afghan boy whom would eventually be taken and abused by theTaliban. We kept going on with different scenarios and different countries. 

Want I want for people to realize is how advanced the United States of America is. Yes, we have our problems... but non comparable to other nations. Look at nations such as Afghanistan, Iraq, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. These are first world nations which have war torn regions occupied by terrorists of all sorts. They also have little to no functioning government, although Afghanistan is improving. Even second world nations, although developing at a steady pace are plagued with an exponential amount of violent crimes and corruption. South Africa would be a prime example. 

Its amazing to read about the "Afghan girl"(s) or better yet Sharbat Gula. After all she has gone through she still has hope for her younger children. After enduring such a life of foul experiences she is still able to place all her faith into Allah and hope for the best for her children. It is also neat to see her place such a high level of importance on education. Education is the foundation for all development. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:58 AM

These two images are rather striking. They depict seventeen years in the life a young female Afghani refuge. They depict seventeen years of hell. The woman in this photograph has lived a hard life. Seventeen years probably feels like fifty years to her. On her face, you see the effects of living a life as a refugee. A life of not having a true home or place that you can count on. A life of living in deplorable refugee camps. It is the shame of the world, that people are forced to live like this. Unfortunately this women's story is an all to common occurrence in Afghanistan. Thousands have suffered similar fates in refugee camps. We must never forget the suffering of these people.

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God Grew Tired of Us

God Grew Tired of Us | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The story of the "Lost Boys" of Sudan is a heartbreaking and inspiring tale of youth caught in cultural and geopolitical conflicts and fored to leave their homes. The film God Grew Tired of Us tells a moving story of young people overcoming incredible challenges and struggling to improve their own lives and those of family and friends left behind."  Linked here is a lsson plan from National Geographic "to teach students about concepts of migration, cultural mosaics, sense of place, and forces of cooperation and conflict among communities" using this 90 minute documentary.  The film can be viewed online on HULU as well as other media outlets.  


Tags: culture, Africa, political, conflict, war, migration, development, APHG

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?


The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.

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Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 2014 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 2015 8:45 PM

It would make sense for the immediate well-being of the girls for the family to just leave Pakistan. As the article mentioned, the economy is horrible for graduates (especially women) and the country lives in a dangerous military state. Yet, the family (excluding the father) continues to stay in Pakistan. I wonder, since their father is a doctor and can afford private schooling, if they stay because of the wealth advantage. As the author alluded to, girls can be more than teachers if they have the resources like Prime Minster Buhtto did. Still though, with the danger so high and better jobs available I really think there is more to the story. The explanation that makes most sense to me came from Mahrukh’s statement regarding Prime Minster Buhtto when she said, “Everyone has to go from this world, why not be famous? Why not make a name and leave your name on people’s lips.” This quote shows just how dedicated Mahrukh is to her country. It is so high that she is willing to die doing something important (provided it makes her famous).  In some ways, I find that misguided. I think the attention girls like her and Malala can bring to people who are donating to the politically broken school is of immense value. This attention wakes more people up to the issues of Pakistan and the issues of the Taliban to one day put more pressure on the nation. Yet, I know Malala doesn’t want to continue to raise awareness among the Western world her whole life. Her autobiography ends with her dreaming of returning to Pakistan. Like Mahrukh, she will die for her country too (308-311). A part deep down can see though, that for a revolution to happen the girls need to actually stay within the country. For one, the west can only interfere with the politics of another country for so long. Furthermore, I am still a legitimate believe in sovereignty despite the increasing globalization. By this I mean that it is the countries issue and it is through the pressure and convictions of the people against the government and the Taliban that will have the most impact. I hope that by staying these girls will one day have an immense impact on the social culture in Pakistan. 

 

*Yousafzai, Malala, and Christina Lamb. I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban. First ed. New York: Little, Brown, 2013. 308-311. Print.
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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.

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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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AIDS/HIV

AIDS/HIV | Geography Education | Scoop.it

AIDS is a global issue, but clearly this impacts Sub-Saharan Africa far more than any other region. 


Tags: Africa, medical, infographic, development.

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 11, 2014 2:59 PM

If AIDS is obviously a bigger problem in SUb-Saharan Africa i would hope that, that is where we would send the most help and further educate people about safe sex and how to prevent from spreading AIDS.

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Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade

Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade | Geography Education | Scoop.it
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — South American engineers are trying to tackle one of the continent's greatest natural challenges: the towering Andes mountain chain that creates a costly physical barrier for...


At the NCGE conference, noted author Harm De Blij mentioned a daring project that would link Eastern South America with the Pacific as engineers were planning to tunnel under the Andes mountains.  Here is a link to an article on this intermodal transportation project that would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic.  Government officials in both Argentina and Brazil have described the  project as a matter of "national interest."  


Tags: transportation, LatinAmerica, globalization, industry, economic, development, unit 6 industry.

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Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 12:54 PM

This is a great idea for a region that has the need to travel so much through such a tough area. Even if it will cost a lot of money to accomplish, in the long run it will save more than it costs to build.  This could change so much, and really boost their economies. Not only would it speed up shipping time and lower shipping costs, but it would allow more shipping to be done which means more business throughout the entire year as opposed to the situation now with snow getting in the way. Not only would it effect that aspect of the economy but it would also produce jobs for the time of the work being done, which is never a bad thing.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:19 AM

If this project can be accomplished, it would truly be one of the greatest engineering feats in human history. To build a railroad tunnel through the Andes mountains seems impossible, but in all likelihood with the right amount of funding, it can be done. The tunnel would have great economic benefits for both Brazil and Argentina. Goods from both countries could be shipped in both directions with out any issues. The larger world would also benefit from the train tunnel. It is estimated that the tunnel would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic. The entire global trading market would benefit from this development.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:44 PM
Doing something such as this is a brilliant move in engineering. Making a tunnel through the Andes will connect countries together, make shipping much easier and doing so may cut the cost of goods being shipped and received. Just like the Panama Canal increased the cargo freight lining industry for shipping, this will also increase an industry for railways,.
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Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This conveys some important realities about the demographic necessities of agriculture, the economic impact and the cultural differences in agricultural production. As with all long infographics on this site, you can "scroll down" on the image by putting the cursor in the top right-hand corner of the image and sliding on the translucent bar. 


Tags: agriculture, infographic, unit 5 agriculture.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 2014 10:00 AM

Unit 5

Mrs. B's curator insight, March 23, 6:02 AM

This conveys some important realities about the demographic necessities of agriculture, the economic impact and the cultural differences in agricultural production. As with all long infographics on this site, you can "scroll down" on the image by putting the cursor in the top right-hand corner of the image and sliding on the translucent bar. 


Tags: agriculture, infographic, unit 5 agriculture.

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Economic Inequality

Economic Inequality | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Make your own conclusions...

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Tony Hall's curator insight, February 20, 2013 11:44 PM

Really good series of infographics on unequal distribution of wealth in the world. Perfect for teaching IB Geography Disparities in Wealth topic.

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Azerbaijan Is Rich. Now It Wants to Be Famous.

Azerbaijan Is Rich. Now It Wants to Be Famous. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Oil-rich, velvet-rope-poor Azerbaijan, a country about the size of South Carolina on the Caspian Sea, would very much like to be the world’s next party capital.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Azerbaijan has limited cultural prestige and international recognition, but it has great quantities of oil, and they are parlaying that wealth into an important geopolitical position in Central Asia.  It appears that Baku has ambitions to become the next Dubai.


Tags: Azerbaijan, political, development, Central Asia, unit 4 political.


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 2015 1:06 PM

Oil is a prime element in making a country very rich, almost like gold was back in the Age of Exploration.  The fact that a country that not many have heard of (including myself) one day hopes to be the new Dubai is completely believable.  Dubai itself, at one time, was another country that no one had heard of before and yet today it is the playground of the mega-rich.  Ibrahimov certainly has a dream for the city of Baku which he wants to build as the "Dubai of Central Asia".  I think that when it is all finished, the city should be impressive.  Yet, Ibrahimov always tried to avoid political questions, however this is very wise of him, because in this part of the world politics can be a very dangerous affair.  Ibrahimov himself, is very very wealthy.  I am not surprised that he said people with political pull believe in what he is doing.  The only thing that worries me about these oil rich countries is once the oil eventually runs out, then what will they do?  Also, it is interesting to see how Russia will react as the country of Azerbaijan increases its international presence in the coming years and becomes (in its hope) a rich nation.  I believe that will be very interesting to see, especially if the nation attempts to send oil directly to Europe, thus weakening an advantage Russia holds over the Western Europeans.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:52 PM

Azerbijan a country on the west coast of the Caspian sea is a very well equipped area with oil. This country also has the waterway in and out of the Caspian. Because of the oil and minerals that this country has they are becoming increasingly rich and gaining strength in the middle east. 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:13 PM

By the looks of it, a tiny nation about the size of South Carolina, Azerbaijan wants to be exactly like Dubai. They want to be famous for what they have. It appears as if they will use their crude oil resources as their help to the top of the world. They will be quite the impressive country if they come out to be what they want. With help from the petroleum country BP, they are pumping oil out of the Caspian Sea. 

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Booming Bhutan

Booming Bhutan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Long impoverished and isolated, tiny Bhutan is finally booming. This onetime absolute monarchy has also made important democratic reforms and major improvements in quality of life.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Located on the southern edge of the Himalayas, Bhutan's rugged topography is key to it's economic strategy to modernize this lightly populated, less developed mountain kingdom.  Bhutan is harnessing hydroelectric energy and selling it to India, which accounts for 20% of the GDP. Today Bhutan is one the five fastest growing economies in the world.  However, the economic developed is highly uneven; 40% of the population is still engaged in subsistence farming on the limited arable land showing that there are still substantial development issues ahead.

 

Tags: South Asia, development, economic, rural, Bhutan.

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, November 2, 2014 2:32 PM

Culture

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:13 PM

Bhutan should consider themselves lucky that their country is located between China and India, two of the most powerful economic countries of the world. Without China and India, Bhutan's economy would be extremely poor because of it's size but because India agreed to assist Bhutan with grants, Bhutan has a successful economy. It's not one of the strongest but it's gratefully acceptable. Also, because manufacturing spread throughout southeast Asia, Bhutan is credited for manufacturing goods and manufacturing companies which helps build its economy.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:42 AM

With a severe lack of arable land-representing less than 5% of the nation's total area- Bhutan has struggled to provide for its population of some 700,000, the result of the geographical realties inclosed by its borders. A small, impoverished nation, many sectors of its economy are ailing as a result of a lack of an agricultural base, and the nation is highly reliant on foreign aid in order to feed its people. However, this may soon change, as the nation is experiencing such a powerful economic burst that it has now become one of the top 4 fastest growing economies in the world. The exportation of hydroelectric energy to India has become a vital hub of the Bhutanese economy, with some 20% of its GDP reliant on the trade alone. With plans to open several more dams in the nation, there is hope that the increased revenue will continue to raise improving standards of living for the nation's people, as well as stimulating other sectors of the economy. There is still much work to be done, and there are several problems the tiny Asian nation must still face- an ever-rising national debt and inflation rate are just two issues that must be dealt with in the coming years- but Bhutan's prospects look bright.

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At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success

At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The stunning drop in global child mortality is proof that poor countries are not doomed to eternal misery. Here's how it happened.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Global health has substantially improved in the last two decades.  This article explores the improvements in global health that have been made this year, and the attached interactive feature allows users to explore the changes in global health risks.  Click here for the Guardian's version of this same data and interactive.  


Tags: medical, historical, spatial, technology, development.

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diana buja's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:44 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

Global health has substantially improved in the last two decades.  This article explores the improvements in global health that have been made this year, and the attached interactive feature allows users to explore the changes in global health risks.  Click here for the Guardian's version of this same data and interactive.  

 

SPY PRODUCTS's comment, December 27, 2012 4:05 AM
Hi, Great to see a new list of top travel blogs. With over 8000 uniques per month, I feel mine should be in there somewhere. Could you take a look at http://www.honeymoonpackagesindia.org.in/ ? Thanks
Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, December 27, 2012 8:24 PM

Child mortality info

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Black Marble: The Earth at Night

Black Marble: The Earth at Night | Geography Education | Scoop.it
“Nothing tells us more about the spread of humans across the Earth than city lights.”...


"For three weeks spread out over April and October of this year, the Suomi NPP satellite (jointly of NASA and NOAA) scanned all the Earth's land as it appeared at night. Scientists then mapped the satellite's data -- 2.5 terabytes of it -- over an earlier Blue Marble image, transforming that picture's daytime blues, browns, and greens into a nightime palette of blues, blacks, and gold." 


This video is a great compliment to the classic Earth at Night composite image as well as the adjusted cartogram for population density.  


Questions to Ponder: What do these lights "tell us" about human geography?  What does the intensity of the lights indicate?

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Africa for Norway

Africa for Norway | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This website is an incredibly humorous parody of Eurocentric charitable organizations that, while well-intentioned, propogate many negative stereotypes about Africa. 

    

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the 'point' of Radi-Aid is?  Do you agree with their point?  How does the media influence our idea of places?   


Tags: Africa, development, NGOs, Norway.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:48 PM

This video is a satire regarding the aid sent to Africa, in this case it is aid from Africa sent to Norway. This was created as many within Africa feel the aid given is the wrong things or simply old unwanted garbage. If America and Europe wish to actually send effective aid to Africa its important to diagnose the problems and then send them goods that can actually address the problem.  

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:01 AM

This comedic video of Africa sending Radiator's to Norway, a country that experiences cold weather every year, demonstrates how (we as westerners especially) tend to overwhelm the continent with things they have an overwhelming collection of. Africa is sometimes seen as a continent in need, but people who are sending "aid" to the continent often neglect to understand that they continent have made great stride to be able to compete in the global economy. Now that the roles have been reversed, its funny to see African's taking initiative to help Norway combat there winter weather.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:12 PM
After seeing this video, I can do nothing but laugh. "Raid - Aid" I see the point that the African people are thinking, it is cold in Norway and Africa can be a hot country, so the idea of sending the unused radiators to Norway to warm them up is funny. In reality, Norway is a very advanced country technologically, actually, as a matter of fact, it is also one of the most stable countries too. For Africa to send radiators to Norway, it is useless and they would probably just end up scrapping the metal from the radiators.
Suggested by Ryan LaHayne
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Inside North Korea

Go undercover with National Geographic correspondent Lisa Ling as she journeys into mysterious and reclusive North Korea.


We know so little about life in North Korea since they have the world’s least free press (that is not hyperbole--Freedom House ranks countries from 0 to 99 with 0 being the most free and 99 being the least free.  North Korea has recently "improved" its rating to 97, the worst in the world). Official coverage is highly censored and filled with government propaganda. This 2009 glimpse is incredibly poignant.


Tags: East Asia, development, states, poverty.

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South African township's solar-powered cafe

South African township's solar-powered cafe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Entrepreneur converts shipping container into mobile internet shop powered entirely by the sun.

This 2-minute video shows how a an enterpreneur has made his business (an internet cafe) self-sufficient, not relying much on external infrastruture.  Modern Africa has advanced beyond what many in the developed world acknowledge and is beyond some the old stereotypes of that characterize how people view the 'Dark Continent.' 


Tags: Africa, technology, development, video.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:36 PM
This shop is awesome. Good for him opening this up randomly, from security guard to owning a solar powered cafe. It gives children the opportunity to become more familiar with the internet and how to use it. What a great idea.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:59 PM

In South Africa, a shipping container is transformed into a mobile internet shop reliant on solar power. While the rest of the world is much more advanced in technology, this shows how non-advanced countries are trying to catch up!

Suggested by Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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UN High Commissioner for Refugees

UN High Commissioner for Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.


Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 


Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, January 22, 2013 12:20 AM

Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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Spanish Crisis Revives Calls For Catalan Secession

Spain's dismal economy has residents of the country's richest region, Catalonia, wondering if they'd be better off going it alone. With their own language and distinct culture, Catalans have long pushed for independence from Spain.


This podcast merges several geographic strands together as economic turmoil in the southern portion of the Euro Zone has fanned the flames of cultural resentment and put discussions for Catalonian independence on the agenda for local politicians. 


Questions to ponder: Will this internal devolution cause greater disintegration in the European Union or Spain?  Would an independent Catalan be a wise move for the Catalonians?  How would their independence impact Spain?    


Tags: political, autonomy, economic, Europe, devolution, sovereignty, unit 4 political.

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Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial

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Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 9:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 3:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.