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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests

Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new global survey suggests world's the most wasteful countries feel the least guilty—and vice-versa.

 

Our consumption patterns, ecological footprint and lifestyle choices have a significant impact on how we feel about sustainability initiatives and human/environmental interactions.  

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Seth D.'s comment, September 4, 2012 8:27 AM
This article explains about America being the least green in the world when it comes to transportation, etc. Things are being done which can bring a good impact to our environment like cleaner gasoline or cars that are run on electricity like the hybrid cars that you see in the commercials on TV. But, there's also a few other ways to make a good impact on the environment like riding a bicycle to work for take public transportation or walk to places you want to go to. Not only we can get good exercise by walking or riding a bicycle but you can reduce the emmissions in the air form your own car. When it comes to food, Americans can start eating vegetables to make a good impact on the environment.
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Recycling Steel

Recycling Steel | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Steel is strong, versatile and 100% recyclable. Learn how old steel shipping containers are given a new lease on life as liveable spaces.

 

Reusing resources is a critical part of sustainability.  This video looks at the recycling of steel including the creating of container homes.

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Dramatic Greenland Ice Melt

Scientists capture dramatic footage of Arctic glaciers melting in hours Scientists have captured dramatic footage of massive lakes in the Arctic melting away...

 

An amazingly extreme place that is far removed from inhabited regions of our planet, but still heavily impacted by people nonetheless.  

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Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 10:10 PM
It shows us how humanity impacts the planet wherever we are
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A Nation Of Meat Eaters: See How It All Adds Up

Americans eat more meat than almost anyone else in the world, but habits are starting to change. This may be in part because of health and environmental concerns. We explore some of the meat trends and changes in graphs and charts.

 

Often we hear about the dietary impact of meat consumption at the personal scale, but what are the environmental impacts of heavy meat consumption on a global scale?  Even more telling than the podcast are the charts and infographics that are connected to this article.  Not all meats have the same environmental impact (beef is much less environmentally efficient than chicken, pork or turkey).   As globalization has spread, American cultural preferences have changed worldwide taste preferences.  As the global population rises, the impact of meat consumption is now a major environmental concern. 

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Industrial Environmental Disasters

Industrial Environmental Disasters | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It's not two photos stitched together, and it's not an installation. This red line is the stain of toxic sludge.

 

This is a great issue that highlights the human-environmental interactions theme.  In 2011, this site in Hungary witnessed a horrific toxic sludge spill at an aluminum oxide plant that literally created a toxic mudslide. 

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 22, 2012 9:47 AM
such a horrible scene, just another footprint we've stomped into the earth
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Blackfriars station, the world's largest solar bridge

Blackfriars station, the world's largest solar bridge | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The new Blackfriars station, which is being built on a bridge spanning the River Thames, is on its way to becoming the world's largest solar bridge after Solarcentury begun the installation of over 4,400 solar photovoltaic panels...

 

"The solar panels will generate an estimated 900,000kWh of electricity every year, providing 50% of the station’s energy and reducing CO2 emissions by an estimated 511 tonnes per year. In addition to solar panels, other energy saving measures at the new station will include rain harvesting systems and sun pipes for natural lighting."

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 6, 2012 8:21 PM
Its definitely a step in the right direction to conserve our natural resources. Our future won't be easy without renewable energy, and all of our natural resources expended.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 9, 2012 6:43 PM
Finding new sources of renewable/sustainable energy would definitely be a lot easier if more countries were willing to work together.
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Cambridge Ideas - How Many Lightbulbs?

Cambridge University physicist, David Mackay, in a passionate, personal analysis of the energy crisis in the UK, in which he comes to some surprising conclus...

 

This is a great video to show students the amount of energy they use, both at an individual level and at the national scale (this video is from the U.K.)  To 'flip' this Ted-Ed talk, visit it's homepage at: http://ed.ted.com/on/MVwtmMV5

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Photos of Southeast Asia

Photos of Southeast Asia | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is an incredibly photo gallery of Vietnam (pictured) and Cambodia.  The photographer, Michael Poliza, has many other place and nature-based galleries at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/poliza/sets/ ;

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 5:35 PM

Absolutely breath taking! From the pictures from the skyline, it is hard to tell that it is inhabited due to its high elevations, but closer pictures of the land and buildings compare to other places in the world, but hold their own importance. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 5:56 PM

By viewing these pictures of areas throughout Cambodia and Vietnam, one can grasp aspects of their culture. From the Buddha statues, historic sites and beautiful natural landscapes. This photographer does a great job of capturing important areas within Southeast Asia. These great pictures encourage people to visit these overlooked areas of the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:59 PM

If I had a helicopter I would certainly be taking it out to see stuff like this. Vietnam is very natural looking. Its lands are filled with awesome demography and topography. What a beautiful sight to see.

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Unexpected Consequences

Unexpected Consequences | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Climate change has numerous casualities: the melting of the Arctic Sea ice is one such environment nightmare that's a result of global warming (don't worry Texans, you can just call it a "freak heat wave" or an "inexplicable anomaly").   But like all global processes, not all places are impacted equally.  Even in an economic recession, some find fortune while the majority flounder.  Same is true with the melting of the Artic; the melting might potentially opening up the fabled Northwest Passage and create new, seasonal shipping lanes.  Who would benefit from this?  Who would suffer?  To see a short video on this, see: http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/09/melting-arctic-sea-ice-and-shipping-routes  

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Scientists Tackle The Geography Of Nature Vs. Nurture In Maps Of U.K.

Scientists Tackle The Geography Of Nature Vs. Nurture In Maps Of U.K. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Genes and the environment both shape health and development. But their effects are not always equal. Researchers in the U.K. say they've mapped hotspots where nature has a stronger influence, and others where nurture dominates.

 

All people are a combination of their genes as well as the environment (a mix of 'nature' and 'nurture').  A recent study of over 5,000 twins throughout the UK saw regional concentrations where it appears that environmental factors had a greater than normal influence (centered around London).  I'm still scratching my head wondering what to make of this data, but this is a compelling project.     

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Scientists observe 'tragic experiment' of tsunami debris

Scientists observe 'tragic experiment' of tsunami debris | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Jeff Larson has seen just about everything wash up on the shores of Santa Cruz: bottles, toys, shotgun shells, busted surfboards and fishing floats that looked like they had bobbed across the Pacific.

 

This is just another long-term 'after-shock' of the tsunami that devasted Japan over 1 year ago. 

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Learning about Water with ArcGIS Online

Learning about Water with ArcGIS Online | Geography Education | Scoop.it
ESRI is the world leader in GIS (geographic information system) technology. This site features free GIS software, online mapping, online training, demos, data, software and service information, user scripts, and more. 

 

This learning module includes activities that analyze water (oceans, rivers, watersheds, wetlands, etc.) within an explicitly spatial context.  As the author of the module, Joseph Kerski states: "Water is a spatial subject: It easily moves among its solid, liquid, or gas phases on our planet. It flows through oceans, rivers, wetlands, glaciers, and through the hydrologic cycle at different rates.  Thus, the geographic perspective and GIS are useful to understanding water from local to global scales.  These activity use ArcGIS Online, a Web-based Geographic Information System (GIS).  No previous experience with GIS is necessary."

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New Evidence Reveals Shell Wildly Underreported Niger Delta Oil Spill

New Evidence Reveals Shell Wildly Underreported Niger Delta Oil Spill | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New data shows Shell dramatically under-estimated the damage of a 2008 spill that devastated the lives of tens of thousands of people in Niger Delta. Shell has yet to compensate victims.

 

The volume of oil spilt at Bodo was more than 60 times the volume Shell has repeatedly claimed leaked.  This is but one example of a international corporation exploiting the natural resources of a developing country.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:12 PM

This article talks about how Shell seems to have underestimated the damage caused by the oil spill in 2008 when tens of thousands of barrels of oil polluted the land and creeks surrounding Bodo. The spill has compromised the access to clean food and water, destroyed livelyhoods and put health at risk. Shell still has not compositated the people of Bodo with the bags of food to replace what was destroyed nor have they cleaned up the spill. These poor people, they have had so much destroyed and need help from shell and they refuse to step up and take responsibility and do what it right. 

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Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.

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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

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Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational

Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The final 32 generators went into operation this week, making it the world's largest hydropower project, pictured, built on the Yangtze River in China."  This photo gallery has a tremendous video at the end that displays vividly the raw power that moves the turbines.  Economically, what are the benefits? Environmentally, what are the costs?    

 


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Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt | Geography Education | Scoop.it
NASA researchers are expressing concern about something they've never seen before: the melting of ice across nearly the entire surface of Greenland earlier this month.

 

Climate changes are afoot in the Arctic and the Greenland ice sheet.  For more on the Arctic. In related news, Texas and Louisiana have introduced education standards that require educators to teach climate change denial as a valid scientific position. South Dakota and Utah passed resolutions denying climate change. Tennessee and Oklahoma also have introduced legislation to give climate change skeptics a place in the classroom.

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Sarah Curtis's comment, September 3, 2012 3:33 PM
I didn't know how bad global warming was until I read this article and I don't think many people realize it either. We need to start changing our ways if we want to live in a safe and healthy environment. I think more people need to see images and read articles like this so they have a better knowledge on how little time we have.
Morgan Halsey's comment, September 10, 2012 11:30 PM
Some people still don't believe in global warming, but now with new technology, there is great evidence. New technology has allowed us to explore our world in ways that we have not been able to before. We are now able see things about our world and fix problems before they become worse.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:12 PM
I am surprised about how the polar ice caps are melting and that global warming is very real, but on the other hand it's just part of the Earth maturing
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8 Amazing Drowned Buildings

8 Amazing Drowned Buildings | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The majority of these 'drowned buildings' are the direct result of decisions to dam a river and create a reservoir, create hydroelectricity, etc.  How should we analyze this type of cultural landscape?  What does it 'say' about the multiple groups that have contributed to this layered, complex landscape?  Pictured here is the St. Nicolas Church in Macedonia, an 1850 building that is losing to the unrelenting 2003 reservoir that at times fully submerges the building.     

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Cows make less milk in hot sticky weather

Cows make less milk in hot sticky weather | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Research news from leading universities...

 

Sometimes whe teach human geography as though it is not connected to physical geography.  The geographical distribution patterns of agriculture are some of the most highly correlated human activities to the physical environment.  This one, dairy productivity, changes greatly based on temperatures, humidity and latitude. 

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Emergency Management: #ActNow, Save Later

Since the year 2000, almost 1 million people have lost their lives to disasters caused by natural hazards. 2 billion people have been affected. 1 trillion do...

 

In the last decade, almost one million people have been killed by disasters and more than one trillion dollars have been lost. Yet only 1% of international aid is spent to minimize the impact of these disasters.  Every $1 spent on preparedness saves $7 on response, so the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has established http://www.actnowsavelater.org to prepare for the disasters which will surely come. 

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Kim Vignale's comment, July 5, 2012 8:18 PM
I think this is a great video depicting how disasters are handled today. Lack of preparation increases more damage caused by natural disasters. If more time and money is spent on devising plans on how to prepare for disasters, preventing it, and alleviating the issue, there would be less money lost and most importantly more lives saved.
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Why damming world's rivers is a tricky balancing act

Why damming world's rivers is a tricky balancing act | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If we accept that controversial dams will continue to be built for economic benefit, how can we limit their damage on the environment?

 

"Of all the ways we have engineered Earth in the Anthropocene, the Age of Man, surely nothing rivals our audacious planetary-wide re-plumbing of the world's waterways. But is our control of Earth's arteries causing dangerous clots?"  The human-environmental interaction theme of geography is as readily apparent in this issue as any.  

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Jose Sepulveda's comment, June 30, 2012 5:24 PM
It would be possible if only the whole ecosystem is managed so as to damp negative synergies and keep permanent monitoring over the river as a whole, from its origin to its final discharge into the sea.
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Climate Change is Simple

David Roberts is staff writer at Grist.org. In "Climate Change is Simple" he describes the causes and effects of climate change in blunt, plain terms. On Apr...

 

This is video is designed to explain climate change in 15 minutes.  If you would like see the slides presented, you can see them at: http://grist.org/climate-change/climate-change-is-simple-we-do-something-or-were-screwed/

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California's Deadlocked Delta

California's Deadlocked Delta | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What did the Delta look like 200 years ago? See an interactive map of the historical habitat and present day landscape, as well as the old photos, maps and journals used by historical ecologists to answer that question.

 

This interactive module has over 20 different maps and perspectives to show both the physical and human geography of a particular environment.  As the delta's ecosystem has been failing, the importance of understanding the interconnections between people, places and our environment becomes all the more critical.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 11:02 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the concept of human geography vs physical geography in that its maps and interactive models provide a basis for the difference between the two subfields of geography.

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Landscapes of Oil

Landscapes of Oil | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Socks is a online magazine about Media, Art, Architecture, Cities, Design, Technology.

 

Our society is obviously heavily dependent on oil.  Yet we often don't see the environmental impacts of our collective oil consumption on the landscape because the negative impacts have been spatially separated away from oil consumers.  This is an excellent compilation of photos by Edward Burtynsky that makes the connection between oil consumption and changes to both the physical and cultural landscapes explicit.  For more images by this artist, see: http://www.edwardburtynsky.com/ ;

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Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 8:58 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

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Evolution in a Big City

Using newts, coyotes and mice, Jason Munshi-South shows how animals develop genetic differences in evolution, even within an urban city. "Evolution in a Big ...

 

Humanity has obviously had an enormous impact on the environment and our sprawling metropolitan areas are the primary example.  However, we often fail to think about how urbanization is impacting other species inhabiting the planet.  Our cities have essentially created 'islands' of livable habitat for many species and the same evolutionary processes of divergence and extinction are now seen in our urban areas.  Island biogeography is becoming increasingly important as we continue to fracture and fragment the environment within which other species can live.  This incredible Ted Talk can be seen (and flipped) on the new TED-ED site at: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/evolution-in-a-big-city

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Most Polluted Cities 2012

Most Polluted Cities 2012 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

What factors lead to high pollution rates in Bakersfield, Los Angeles and Fresno?  How are economic, industrial, political and environmental factors contributing to or mitigating the situation?  

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Eric Séguin's comment, June 1, 2012 7:27 AM
Map serves absolutely nothing. Keep the infographic and be done with: "do you know where Bakersfield, CA is". If you actually had the coverage of these types of pollution then maps would be useful.