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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time

Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Until now, there has been a lack of solid, comprehensive spatial data about African groundwater resources.  Researchers have now done so.  For a more academic article on the subject, here are their findings in Environmental Research Letters


Tags: water, Africa, resources, physical, environment, environment depend.    

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Ocean Opportunity

Ocean Opportunity | Geography Education | Scoop.it
the undersea work & world of Michael Lombardi...


Michael Lombardi is a both a scientific and commercial diver; as an author and environmentalist and an Explorer in Residence with the National Geographic Society.  This Saturday he will be the guest speaker for the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance meeting and I am incredibly excited to hear from him.  

 

Tags: water, National Geographic, RhodeIsland, physical, biogeography, environment.

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EARTH Masterpieces

The natural landscapes shown as captured by satellite imagery is as beautiful as anything artists have ever created.  Some of the colors shown in the video may seem otherworldy.  Most of those color anomalies are due to the fact that remotely sensed images have more information in them than just what we see in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.  Some of these images are processed to show different bands so we can visually interpret data such as what is in the near infra-red band, skewing the color palette.

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Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:09 AM

CD 1: The different types of landscapes and their distinctive landform features.

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Real-time Earthquake Map

Real-time Earthquake Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program, responsible for monitoring, reporting, and researching earthquakes and earthquake hazards...

 

This map represents the 1079 earthquakes with magnitudes higher than 2.5 that have occured in the last 30 days.  You can customize the map to display different data at any scale.  There is detailed information about each earthquake in this great dataset. 

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Trisha Klancar's comment, August 18, 2012 5:33 AM
I've used this often and kids love it. It is visual and allows them to realize what is happening at that very moment and PERHAPS gets them to see the world doesn't revolve around them! hee,hee
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Mount St. Helens: Volcanic Eruption and Recovery

Mount St. Helens: Volcanic Eruption and Recovery | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption was one of the most significant natural disasters in the U.S. in the past half-century. Landsat captured the extent of, and recovery from, the destruction.

 

The accompanying satellite images (also compiled in a video to show the temporal changes) demonstrate one way that remote sensing images can help us better understand the spatial patterns in the biosphere. 

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Dramatic Greenland Ice Melt

Scientists capture dramatic footage of Arctic glaciers melting in hours Scientists have captured dramatic footage of massive lakes in the Arctic melting away...

 

An amazingly extreme place that is far removed from inhabited regions of our planet, but still heavily impacted by people nonetheless.  

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Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 7:10 PM
It shows us how humanity impacts the planet wherever we are
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Cows make less milk in hot sticky weather

Cows make less milk in hot sticky weather | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Research news from leading universities...

 

Sometimes whe teach human geography as though it is not connected to physical geography.  The geographical distribution patterns of agriculture are some of the most highly correlated human activities to the physical environment.  This one, dairy productivity, changes greatly based on temperatures, humidity and latitude. 

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Historical Tornado Data Visualized

Historical Tornado Data Visualized | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This strangely beautiful map shows every tornado to hit the U.S. between 1950 and 2011.  What physical geographic factors lead to this distribution?  What are the impacts of this data on human geography?  

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 10, 2012 9:28 AM
Def in agreement with John I'm wondering myself as to what the cause of the hole is. Id speculate it is due to some sort of terrain issues. maybe even man made structures.
melissa stjean's comment, September 4, 2012 9:00 AM
the physical geographic factors that lead to the the distribution of tornadoes in the US is because the jet stream coming from the west and hot air from the Gulf of Mexio air both crashing together. This mostly happens in the Midwestern part of the country. Though there are times when supercell thunderstorms pop up in different parts of the country and can form tornadoes, such as the southern part of the US. The impacts of this data on human geography are can range from little damage to catastrophic causing billions of dollars in damage.
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How to air-condition outdoor spaces

http://www.ted.com During the hot summer months, watching an outdoor sports match or concert can be tantamount to baking uncomfortably in the sun -- but it d...

 

The physical environment will be altered as the World Cup comes to Qatar in an attempt to raise their global economic profile and to present themselves as more culturally comsopolitan.  Except there is that desert conundrum of having soccer matches in the middle of the desert in the dead of summer.  This shows the technological efforts to redefine confortable weather conditions.   This is a good Ted talk that combines cultural, economic and physical geographic factors in the Middle East. 

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Images of Earth From Above

Images of Earth From Above | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Yesterday was Earth Day, a time set aside to increase awareness of the natural environment and the impact of our collective actions...

 

This is a gorgeous set of 39 images that are all view the Earth and captures images for above.  These aerial photography and remote sensing images focus of a wide range of topics such as the cultural landscape, the environment, earth science, cultural ecology and urban systems.   The photo above is of Mont-Saint-Michel, a tourist attraction and UNESCO world heritage site in northwestern France that is the world's premier example of the tombolo landform.


Via M. Roman
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Paige T's comment, August 28, 2012 11:55 AM
Its interesting how patterns in this world repeat themselves, whether in nature or man-made objects. The pictures of the shanty town in Venezuela and the floating ice sheets in Germany are similar in their layers, overlapping, and repetitiveness.
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NOAA Confirms Unprecedented Warmth in March

NOAA Confirms Unprecedented Warmth in March | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The average temperature across the U.S.was 8.6 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century average...

 

Here is a link to some data that backs up what most Americans already knew: the month of March was much warmer that just "unseasonably warm."  IN the Northeast, it was 9.8 degrees (F) above the average, and the warmest March in 118 years.

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Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High

Texas Storm Was Over Eight Miles High | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The astonishing power of Mother Nature....

 

3D NASA images show the magnitude of last week's storm in Texas was immense, vertically towering 8 miles above the Texas landscape.  The storm "spawning 14 tornadoes and golf ball sized hail was immense...[NASA's] Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite watched the storm develop and measured its cloud height at above eight miles high." 

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Wind Map

Wind Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map is a 'nearly live' dynamic display of United States winds patterns (speed, direction and broad spatial context).  Click on the image to see the animated, large version.  Super cool!!

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Ken Morrison's comment, August 30, 2012 5:25 PM
That was cool. Thanks for sharing. I have a new fun tool for virtual storm chasing. I'm not as adventurous as I used to be. Is there any chance that there is an international version? We had a big typhoon in Asia this past week. Crazy weather.
Luis Sadeck 's comment, September 24, 2013 6:01 AM
Very crazy this map! One good application from technics of collect of data and building of map enviromental.

Thanks for sharing
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Google Earth Fractals

Google Earth Fractals | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Who says you can't integrate geography and real world applications into the math curriculum?  Paul Bouke has scoured the Earth searching for fractals in the natural environment and created this amazingly artistic remote sensing gallery (with KMZ files for viewing in Google Earth as well).  


Tags: Remote sensing, art, math, google, physical, landforms, geomorphology

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Seth Dixon's comment, September 9, 2012 5:40 PM
Thanks for sharing so many great link on FB and have been able to use several. I'm glad that the sharing can go in both directions.
Ann Kissinger Wurst's comment, September 9, 2012 5:44 PM
Seth - I am hardly worthy of YOUR currating! Hope to meet you in person at NCGE and get a picture of us for Facebook. :-)
Paige T's comment, September 10, 2012 8:21 AM
This is so beautiful. Fractals are an amazing phenomenon, whether you are an artist, geographer, or mathematician. I love being able to see fractals in plants or feel them as air travels through my lungs.
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What If?

What If? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This blogpost answers the (often unasked) question:  What would the world be like if the land masses were spread out the same way as now - only rotated by an angle of 90 degrees? While purely hypothetical, this is an exercise in applying real geographic thinking to different situations.  Anything that you would correct? 


Tags: weather climate, geography, GeographyEducation, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, physical

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Dania's comment, September 5, 2012 8:41 PM
well!!!
I'll tell you that it's why God created Mother Nature. maybe what we think is bad now in nature can be worse for the the Earth and human being... I think if the ground is moved 90 degree, many natural phenomena would happened in many regions of the Earth which would be harm to people, plants and animals that live in those regions. Plus, the population of poor nation would not be prepared for those climate changes.... many people would die or they have to move from those regions.
Jeff F's comment, September 5, 2012 9:50 PM
This looks like a map from the classic NES game Dragon Warrior II only flipped upside down. #nerd

Anyways, I think the most densely populated areas would be around the central ocean with New York and London being primate cities of their respected hemispheres.

Given that that the central ocean area is in an equatorial region, agriculture would likely not be very prosperous in these regions. Instead, I imagine New York becoming the center of an imperial superpower. Seeing as the most fertile regions of both South and North America are in temperate areas, agriculture would be a dominating industry.

The northern hemisphere on the other I hand I imagine would be largely undeveloped and rural. The "breadbaskets" of this hemispher are located much further inland from the central ocean.
Ian Roberts's comment, September 11, 2012 5:57 PM
First off I would like to say travel to Europe would be much easier and the Pacific Ocean grew even larger. One thing that really got me wondering was whether the world would be northern hemisphere centered or southern hemisphere centered. Currently, there are many more people in the northern hemisphere, so things like the summer olympics are held in our summer, their winter. BUt with the world turned ninety degrees, the population will be much more similar. The north will probably still have more people, but the south has America. It would be interesting to see how they would decide that conflict.
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Physical Geography

This a visually stunning video montage with clips compiled from the Discovery Channel's series "Planet Earth."  

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The Human and Natural World

While I do enjoy this video, it is especially interesting in in how it conceptualizes the world in the two frames.  Urban, human, civilized society on one side, with natural, unsettled wilderness on the other.  The video attempts to bridge the divide, hoping that more people will see more interconnections between the human/urban world and the natural/wildlife world.  While geographers recognize that all elements of the planet are interconnected, most people still think of the world through dichotomies such as these: civilization vs. wilderness, cultural vs. natural and human vs. animal.  How do these terms shape our thinking about the world?     

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Plate Tectonics with Oreo Cookies

Plate Tectonics with Oreo Cookies | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The lithosphere (Earth's crust) is a hard, rigid plate on top of a softer molten layer known as the asthenosphere.  Sounds like an Oreo to me!  As a crude analogy that lets you bring food into the classroom, this lesson on plate boundaries sound like a winner.  Read this for an academic article on how to use Oreo's to teach about Earth's crust.    

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Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt | Geography Education | Scoop.it
NASA researchers are expressing concern about something they've never seen before: the melting of ice across nearly the entire surface of Greenland earlier this month.

 

Climate changes are afoot in the Arctic and the Greenland ice sheet.  For more on the Arctic. In related news, Texas and Louisiana have introduced education standards that require educators to teach climate change denial as a valid scientific position. South Dakota and Utah passed resolutions denying climate change. Tennessee and Oklahoma also have introduced legislation to give climate change skeptics a place in the classroom.

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Sarah Curtis's comment, September 3, 2012 12:33 PM
I didn't know how bad global warming was until I read this article and I don't think many people realize it either. We need to start changing our ways if we want to live in a safe and healthy environment. I think more people need to see images and read articles like this so they have a better knowledge on how little time we have.
Morgan Halsey's comment, September 10, 2012 8:30 PM
Some people still don't believe in global warming, but now with new technology, there is great evidence. New technology has allowed us to explore our world in ways that we have not been able to before. We are now able see things about our world and fix problems before they become worse.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 1:12 PM
I am surprised about how the polar ice caps are melting and that global warming is very real, but on the other hand it's just part of the Earth maturing
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Historical Earthquake Data

Historical Earthquake Data | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This map of all the world's recorded earthquakes between 1898 and 2003 is stunning. As you might expect, it also creates a brilliant outline of the plates of the Earth's crust—especially the infamous "Ring of Fire" around the Pacific Plate.

 

The plate boundaries are amazingly vivid in this geovisualization of the all the earthquakes over  a 105 year span.  How did scientist orginally come up with the theory of plate tectonics?  How did spatial thinking and mapping play a role in that scientific endeavor?

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Why damming world's rivers is a tricky balancing act

Why damming world's rivers is a tricky balancing act | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If we accept that controversial dams will continue to be built for economic benefit, how can we limit their damage on the environment?

 

"Of all the ways we have engineered Earth in the Anthropocene, the Age of Man, surely nothing rivals our audacious planetary-wide re-plumbing of the world's waterways. But is our control of Earth's arteries causing dangerous clots?"  The human-environmental interaction theme of geography is as readily apparent in this issue as any.  

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Jose Sepulveda's comment, June 30, 2012 2:24 PM
It would be possible if only the whole ecosystem is managed so as to damp negative synergies and keep permanent monitoring over the river as a whole, from its origin to its final discharge into the sea.
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12 of the Most Beautiful Bays in the World

12 of the Most Beautiful Bays in the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a great set of images that show coastal processes for a geomorphology or physical geography class.  Pictured above is Palm Bay, Australia, which also happens to show fluvial processes as well.  

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Earth's Gravity Revealed in Unprecedented Detail

Earth's Gravity Revealed in Unprecedented Detail | Geography Education | Scoop.it
After just two years in orbit, ESA's GOCE satellite has gathered enough data to map Earth's gravity with unrivalled precision.

 

Gravity isn't the same everywhere.  "ESA's GOCE mission has delivered the most accurate model of the 'geoid' ever produced, which will be used to further our understanding of how Earth works. The colours in the image represent deviations in height (–100 m to +100 m) from an ideal geoid. The blue colours represent low values and the reds/yellows represent high values. The geoid is the surface of an ideal global ocean in the absence of tides and currents, shaped only by gravity. It is a crucial reference for measuring ocean circulation, sea-level change and ice dynamics – all affected by climate change."  Follow the link to see an animated version. 

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UK 'saturated' by light pollution

UK 'saturated' by light pollution | Geography Education | Scoop.it
More than half of the UK population cannot see the stars clearly because of light pollution, campaigners say.

 

Another impact of modern technology, urbanization and living in affluent consumer-driven societies. 

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Fossilized Raindrop Dimples Add to Mystery of Ancient Earth's Warmth

Fossilized Raindrop Dimples Add to Mystery of Ancient Earth's Warmth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Pumice-like cratery indents formed by ancient raindrop splats are adding to the mystery of why the adolescent Earth was warm enough to host rivers and oceans, despite the dim sun of the day. Thanks to fossilized impressions from rains that fell down on Africa 2.7 billion years ago, the "Faint Young Sun" paradox is getting curiouser and curiouser.

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