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Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.!

Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.! | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An advertising campaign designed to illustrate the drawbacks of living in the U.K. is being planned to deter an expected surge of immigrants, according to reports
Seth Dixon's insight:

Immigration is a sensitive topic so I'll tread lightly.  There appears to be some support for a campaign that would target would-be migrants specifically from Romania and Bulgaria that life in the U.K. isn't as as grand as it may seem (ironic coming of the heels of the Olympics).  This obviously isn't something that is universally supported by the British, but it does highlight the fact that more and more European countries are seeking ways to deter migrants from crossing their borders as economic struggles continue. 


Tags: migration, UK, immigration, Europe, unit 2 population

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2014 5:22 PM

It appears the U.K. is designing this campaign due to the fact they are struggling financially and they cannot afford to give benefits to some of the immigrants coming into the U.K., as immigrants are entering at a high rate.

When the Olympics games were hosted in London, the weather was beautiful and the sun was shining almost everyday, (which is rare in the U.K.) That made the U.K. even more attractive to foreigners and potential immigrants. This advertising campaign is displaying the drawbacks of living in the U.K., such as the rainy weather and constant grey skies.  

Flaviu Fesnic's curator insight, September 17, 2014 6:02 AM

UKIP launched an aggressive campaign against Romanians and Bulgarians by the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 which completely turned out to be a trick to gain some more votes.Not only this chauvinistic campaign showed a misleading message but it stirred an unjustified feeling of hatred toward Romanians&Bulgarians.Latest figures showed an influx of mostly high qualified persons , in fact !
Unlike the immmigration to Spain and Italy (1mill. to both of these countries) Romanians usually only work there and come back after a while,they don't settle there... It's probably, the Latin blood ! :)

Flaviu Fesnic's comment, September 17, 2014 6:14 AM
so, there was no influx but misleading UKIP politics... visit Cultural Geography on Facebook !
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A Mysterious Patch Of Light

A Mysterious Patch Of Light | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you are up in space looking down on America west of the Mississippi, one of the brightest patches of light at night is on the Great Plains in North Dakota. It's not a city, not a town, not a military installation.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This patch of light is baffled me since clusters of light on this image almost always are connected to high levels of urbanization and North Dakota has no major population center of that magnitude.  This is the Bakken formation, a new oil and gas field that is producing over 600,000 barrels a day.  The lights are oil rigs that are lit up at night, but even more because many gas flares are burning leading locals to call the area "Kuwait on the Prairie."  Oil men from far and wide are flocking to the rural, lightly populated area raising rents sky-high.  This has caused a huge localized gender imbalance, changing the demographic and cultural character of the region because of the drastic the economic and environmental shifts in the area (see the national gender balance here).  This is a great reminder that the physical and human geographies of a region are fully intermeshed one with another. 


Tags: resources, gender, environment, economic, migration.

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Heidi Zumbrun Bjerke's comment, February 12, 2013 9:52 PM
Use google earth and you can compare the two images.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's comment, February 12, 2013 11:55 PM
that's an excellent idea, especially to have students suggest what the light might be in the photo. The question is , is the bright light a one time occurrence or does it continue?J
Mary Rack's comment, February 13, 2013 6:08 AM
I'm having trouble installing GoogleEarth on my iMac. Looking forward to the comparison. Big adjustment after years in the PC world.
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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | Geography Education | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Over 6 million of those living in Canada were born outside of Canada an migrated there.  This infographic cleverly outlines both where migrants live in Canada and where they came from.  Ethnic enclaves are an important part of Canada's rural and urban cultural landscapes.  Since the 1960s, the majority of immigrants have come from Asia, changing some traditional neighborhoods. 


Tags: Canada, ethnicity, migration, infographic, neighborhood

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 2014 1:15 PM

This article contains details about the Canadian immigrant population boom, mostly from east Asia, which began in the 90's. Unsurprisingly, many of these immigrants settle into communities with others whom share their culture. These Canadian ethnic enclaves differ from those in the US because most immigrants are choosing suburban areas (where the cost of living is lower) rather than being relegated to an urban "ethnictown." However, these enclaves are not entirely a product of economic equality as the average earnings for a recent immigrant are only 61% of a Canadian-born worker, limiting their ability to move elsewhere.

 

Conversely, the immigrant communities which become economically successful are seeing many of their sons and daughters move away to the city or other suburbs as they are more fully integrated into the Canadian culture and if there is no influx of new immigrants into these enclaves they begin to die out. This seems to indicate that long-standing ethnic enclaves are at least partially the product of economic inequality than a desire to preserve culture.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:41 AM

This article was interesting because it showed how modern immigration patterns are not that dissimilar from historic patterns.  People come to a new country and they settle in an area that has relatives or familiar people already living there.  The formation of ethnic enclaves is the example.  People are choosing to self-segregate when they immigrate to a new homeland because it is the familiar with in the strange.  Perhaps once the new immigrants have acclimated to Canadian society they may move out of the enclave areas but they also may stay.  It is an interesting example of how people cluster together with similar people when they move to a new country.

Gubert's curator insight, February 11, 2015 5:17 AM

XIPHIAS Immigration is one among the Top Five Immigration Consultants in India according to The siliconindia as Top Five Most Promising Immigration Consultants. www.xiphiasimmigration,com

 

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Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India

Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A boom and social change are pitting young working women in the city against men from conservative villages.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The recent resurgence of this issue had me looking through the archives and stumbled upon this 2011 article.  As urban expansion is booming in many Indian cities, the modern city expands into the countryside.  The cultural values of these two demographic groups are quite distinct.  Young, educated women are part of the modern cities' workforce but in many conservative, traditional Indian villages, women working outside the home are seen as "lacking in virtue."  In many of the recent gang rape cases, the perpetrators are less educated young men from surrounding villages and the victims are well-educated young working women that are a part of the new city.    


Public spaces, especially at night, are seen as masculine spaces in most traditional societies.  One of the mothers of an accused rapist succinctly explained this mindset thusly: "If these girls roam around openly like this, then the boys will make mistakes."  This is seen as 'Eve teasing,' where women are perceived as responsible for the violence committed against them to maintain social order.  As another article hints, the outrage that this incident ignited could lead towards long-term change in Indian society.   


This other NY Times article op-ed states, "India must work on changing a culture in which women are routinely devalued. Many are betrothed against their will as child brides, and many suffer cruelly, including acid attacks and burning, at the hands of husbands and family members.  India, a rising economic power and the world’s largest democracy, can never reach its full potential if half its population lives in fear of unspeakable violence."


Tags: India, migration, South Asia, culture, urban, folk culture, megacities.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:37 PM

This issue is very distrubing. First of all it talks about the poor inocent women and girls who leave their house so they are automatically a victim and should be forwarned that they will be hurt if leaving thie house like as if they should be resticted to their home life and never leave. This would be demonstrated as the old India but they are living or rying to live in the New India where the Women in this soicety should nto be subjected to these kinds of crimes. For example something that really took me was "The accused are almost always young high school dropouts from surrounding villages, where women who work outside the home are often seen as lacking in virtue and therefore deserving of harassment and even rape." And then this quote by one of the accused mothers; "“If these girls roam around openly like this, then the boys will make mistakes,” the mother of two of those accused in the rape said in an interview, refusing to give her name."" Like come on get your stuff together, you should have raised your children better than this.  I have to wonder what this society thinks and whether or not people are questioning what kind of society they are living in and if this society is pressured by the values of the sexes.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:06 PM

Getting away with rape in any country is absolutely disgusting. Especially in India where women have been brutalized with no punishment to the predator, these women have a right to stand up for themselves. Being stalked and raped is something that the police need to get a grip on happening to their citizens.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 2015 8:37 PM

It is hearting to see the police force in the modernized area taking such a strong stance. As the article showed it is greatly needed because the reason rape largely happens is because the traditional aspects of Indian culture continue on strongly in the village areas. These men were told for the longest time that women cannot amount to anything and for them to act free is wrong. This type of thinking is heavily engrained into the members of the society so they won’t just stop acting this way on their own accord. Arresting and convicting these men will send a message that their actions are not tolerated and aren’t right despite what they were taught.

 

 It also amazes me that this stance exists because the modernized area were also told these stories at one point too. The only explanation I have for the differences is that the more modernized areas are more welcoming of the freedoms seen in the West. To be clear though, the freedoms are more of a western trait. Thus globalization in this instance might have actually helped the positive result of the police force come about because of the positive influence seen in the Western countries economy and life style when they let women have more freedom.

 

Unfortunately, globalization can’t completely solve rape just yet. The article ends by asserting that to report rape “is a very difficult thing in the Indian context.” Yet, reporting rape anywhere is hard to do. In fact, the mention of 1 in 10 under reported rapes is a statistic similar to that of the United States. Similarly, many victims will refuse to cooperate or even contemplate taking their own life to avoid testimony (in fact many do). In either situation, most rape victims feel they lost their “honor.”  I am not sure when reporting rape or how reporting rape will ever become any easier. However whichever country can figure it out will need to show the rest of the world how. As I do look forward to the day that globalization could decrease rape on a large scale. 

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.


The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:58 PM

You can see in this woman's face that the years have been hard for her living as refugee. Although this seems like National Geographic giving themselves a pat on the back it is important to remember that this women became a national symbol for refugees and yet her life did not improve and furthermore she had no idea that her picture was so well known.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 2015 6:36 PM

I never would have imagined the "Afghan girl" being alive. It's amazing how National Geographic was able to catch up and speak with her and photograph her. This demonstrates the pure professionalism and global outreach national geographic has. 

One of the things I am most thankful about is that I do not live in a war torn society. Being separated from my family, forced to flee and become a refugee is a horrid way of life that I know I would struggle to endure. Some Afghanistan people have been doing this for over twenty years. 

One time I was having a discussion with my friend. We talking about America and the westernized part of the world. He and I agreed how lucky we were to be born in America. We were born white males in the United States of America. We could have been born a woman living in Iran or Iraq, or even as a little rural Afghan boy whom would eventually be taken and abused by theTaliban. We kept going on with different scenarios and different countries. 

Want I want for people to realize is how advanced the United States of America is. Yes, we have our problems... but non comparable to other nations. Look at nations such as Afghanistan, Iraq, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. These are first world nations which have war torn regions occupied by terrorists of all sorts. They also have little to no functioning government, although Afghanistan is improving. Even second world nations, although developing at a steady pace are plagued with an exponential amount of violent crimes and corruption. South Africa would be a prime example. 

Its amazing to read about the "Afghan girl"(s) or better yet Sharbat Gula. After all she has gone through she still has hope for her younger children. After enduring such a life of foul experiences she is still able to place all her faith into Allah and hope for the best for her children. It is also neat to see her place such a high level of importance on education. Education is the foundation for all development. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:58 AM

These two images are rather striking. They depict seventeen years in the life a young female Afghani refuge. They depict seventeen years of hell. The woman in this photograph has lived a hard life. Seventeen years probably feels like fifty years to her. On her face, you see the effects of living a life as a refugee. A life of not having a true home or place that you can count on. A life of living in deplorable refugee camps. It is the shame of the world, that people are forced to live like this. Unfortunately this women's story is an all to common occurrence in Afghanistan. Thousands have suffered similar fates in refugee camps. We must never forget the suffering of these people.

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God Grew Tired of Us

God Grew Tired of Us | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The story of the "Lost Boys" of Sudan is a heartbreaking and inspiring tale of youth caught in cultural and geopolitical conflicts and fored to leave their homes. The film God Grew Tired of Us tells a moving story of young people overcoming incredible challenges and struggling to improve their own lives and those of family and friends left behind."  Linked here is a lsson plan from National Geographic "to teach students about concepts of migration, cultural mosaics, sense of place, and forces of cooperation and conflict among communities" using this 90 minute documentary.  The film can be viewed online on HULU as well as other media outlets.  


Tags: culture, Africa, political, conflict, war, migration, development, APHG

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UN High Commissioner for Refugees

UN High Commissioner for Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.


Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 


Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, January 22, 2013 12:20 AM

Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.

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Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.

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jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

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Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border

Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This lesson plan was specifically designed with Arizona examples and aligned to the Arizona state standards, but it be easily adapted.  I saw a presentation based on this lesson at the NCGE conference as was incredibly impressed.  Also, you'll note that like this one, there are many other lesson plans freely available on the Arizona Geographic Alliance website.  


Tags: K12, borders, political, landscape, migration, unit 4 political.

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oyndrila's comment, October 14, 2012 11:40 AM
I found very useful resources on the website. Thank you for sharing it.
Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an important lesson, especially for those who actually live in Arizona/Mexico and have seen the border itself. Learning about the Arizona/Mexican border is important and shouldn't be left solely to teaching it only in those areas. The maps included in the lesson plan are efficient and could be used in the high school setting.

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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.


I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."


Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.

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Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 1:29 PM
The request video is not available ...
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What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration?

What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, warns that a backlash against immigration would wreak havoc on everything from hospitals to the high-tech industry. The interview is part of the Risk Response Network’s “What if?


This is article can be an intriguing introduction to a thought exercise geared towards understanding the economic impact of migration and the social processes that create our world. 


Questions to ponder:  Which points of the interviewee do you agree with?  Are there some that you think his analysis is off-base?  What do you think the impacts on a given location would be if there was no migration allowed? 


Tagsmigration, economic, unit 2 population, immigration, unit 6 industry, labor.

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The Importance of Place

The Importance of Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Using the vocabulary of this course, please describe in detail the geographic context of a town like this (real or imaginary).  What is the town like?  How did it get that way?  What type of meaning does 'place' have for those that live there?  

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Immigrants Working In America

Immigrants Working In America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. is still a nation of immigrants: One in six U.S. workers was born somewhere else. Here's where America's immigrants come from, and what they do for work.

 

Of the American immigrant population, where were the workers born?  In what industries are they employed?  These are two straight-forward graphics with the answers to those questions.    

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Kate C's comment, July 8, 2012 7:29 PM
I found the second graphic, "Field of Employment by Place of Birth", interesting because of the relevantly even distribution of employment across the board. The Latin American born population seems the be the only one that deviates from the trend, with high percentages in Agricultural and Construction fields, and the lowest numbers in Education, Health Care, & Social Services. Interesting how students are included and I wonder how accurate the Census Bureau is at measuring specific employment information for undocumented immigrants.
Macy Nossaman's curator insight, September 20, 2013 2:26 PM

This is a good article about immigrants in America because it talks about all of the different places people have immigrated from and now live and work in the U.S. Since my topic is European Immigration, It shows that there are 2.4 million Europeans currently working in the U.S.

Laurel Stelter's comment, September 27, 2013 2:23 PM
I think that this is a really interesting article. The two pictures really help define America and its workplace well. It surprised me how many people weren't born in the U.S., but still work here.
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Refugees from Syria

Refugees from Syria | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The number of Syrian refugees who have fled the conflict and crossed the borders hasn't ceased to increase.
Seth Dixon's insight:

UNICEF workers have stated: "More than 600,000 have fled the conflict in Syria and registered as refugees. The number of Syrians who have left without registering is unknown but is likely to be hundreds of thousands. We do know, however, that children make up around half the number of refugees and that is certainly no way for any child to live their childhood."


Tags: Syria, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, October 30, 2013 5:16 PM

The ongoing military conflicts in Syria have caused a significant refugee problem. Refugees are evacuating Syria and entering its geographically close neighbors, including Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq, and Egypt.

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Migration and Geography

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Tony King's comment, January 13, 2013 11:35 AM
Just in case a lot of perfectly sane Americans decide to migrate to a civilized country like Canada
Trisha Klancar's curator insight, January 13, 2013 2:04 PM

I like this as it also sets up the beginning of the lesson if you were were unsure what to do with this.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 10:07 PM

Migration is what is need in order for the human race to relate to one another and survive. This shows us how we can learn form Migration from a geographical stand point. If you look at the Geography of how and where people move you will it will help you to develop a sense of what is next to come or what is needed to survive.

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What we can learn from Mexico

What we can learn from Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Quick facts about the "new" Mexico:

  • Mexico has more international trade deals (44) than any other country.  
  • Mexico exports more manufactured products than all the other countries in Latin America combined
  • Mexico’s GDP is expected to grow by nearly 4% this year, twice as fast as Brazil (and the USA)
  • Mexico's average income (PPP) is higher than China, India or Brazil (Mexico could be a BRIC country if it didn't ruin the acronym).

Does that help in explaining why Mexicans aren't leaving to go to the United States anymore?  In fact, more Mexicans are leaving the United States than entering in a clear example of changing push and pull factors. 

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Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 8:37 PM

The title of this article was what enticed me as I was hoping to find an actual answer. However, based on this article alone, I don’t actually think there is much the United States can learn from Mexico about politics or economics.

 

This author failed to mention that a difference in political systems could also attribute to the new Mexican leader’s ability to obtain “endorsements from across the spectrum.”  Mexico recently had an election. The new President this article is praising is part of a party that controlled the land for 70+ years until Nieto's predecessor. His predecessor messed up with the cartels so badly that Nieto was elected back into office. Given the amount of support Nieto had going into office, it doesn't seem so challenging to negotiate with opposing parties. Plus, I doubt the opposing parts are as unreasonable as some of the United States members of congress, like the Tea Party.   

 

I also see little to glean from the manufacturing route that Mexico is on at the moment. I will admit that the projected GDP growth of 4% mentioned in the article is impressive. However, thinking that the key to economic growth in the United States is through a similar “manufacturing boom” is just out of touch with the times. As stated in class our wages can’t keep up with the cheaper wages of developing countries (a point the author eluded to in the section discussing “the three main factors at play,” factor number three). Thus, doing what Mexico is doing doesn’t fit the American economy. What the United States might try doing is finding a manufacturing niche that no one has a market on in order to obtain more jobs. Maybe something higher end or medically related would be of benefit to the United States. Even these jobs would end up comprising a small part of the United States economy because the United States is more of a white collar economy. As such, more should be done to protect that sector of our economy from things like outsourcing given its relevance to our modern economy.

 

 Overall, I think the media’s quick comparisons of other countries falls under the bad category of globalization. A fair amount of people would just use this article to say things like, if Mexico’s leader can do X Y & Z then so should Obama. Yet, many of those people wouldn’t actually think about all the differences or reasons why Obama can’t compromise or revert the economy backwards. Am I saying Obama shouldn’t try more or that I am happy with the lack of compromise by all, no. However, I think it is dangerous for journalist to gloss over the situation since many people will take them as a credible source to cite. Mind you not all journalism is bad though. The Scoop.It article I read this week regarding Walmart is a great example of how investigative journalism can have positive consequences. The major difference being one actually did their homework that cited concrete specifics, while the other made a flimsy analogy.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 7:44 AM

While our government is perpetually mired in gridlock, the Mexican government is making lasting reforms to their nation. News attention on Mexico is almost always negative. While the violence and the drug trade are serious issues,  not enough attention is being devoted to the rapid growth of the Mexican economy. Politicians in Mexico are coming together to create an environment for positive economic growth. The article describes three factors that are leading to the growth of the Mexican economy. The first factor is Mexico's geographic location. Being located right next door to the United States is an enormous advantage for Mexico. Industrial goods are easily and cheaply being transported across the border. The second factor is the ever controversial NAFTA. The agreement ratified during the Clinton Administration allows for Mexican goods to be sold at lower rates than their Asian counterparts. The final factor is wages. The cheap labor environment has made the nation a manufacturing hub. So what can the United States learn from Mexico? Many of their economic advantages are not applicable to our country. However, we can look to Mexico for an example of functioning government. It well past time that our political parties come together and actually try to govern our nation.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:47 PM

Wow, what an interesting article about the direction Mexico is taking off on. Their GDP is increasing and the worker's wages are surprising better than Chinese workers. Both are huge exports of good and as a younger country than China, Mexico is on it's way to manufacture and economic boom. As neighbor country to Mexico, I am curious to see the actions U.S will take to learn and mirror Mexico's growth.

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Chinese-Mexicans Celebrate Return To Mexico

Chinese-Mexicans Celebrate Return To Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it
MEXICO CITY — Juan Chiu Trujillo was 5 years old when he left his native Mexico for a visit to his father's hometown in southern China. He was 35 when he returned.


Migratory patterns and globalization can lead to some intriguing cultural blends that would seem improbable 100 years ago. This story of shows vividly how ethnicity does NOT always correspond to culture.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:17 PM

What a journey that must have been, to not return to your country for 30 years after going on vacation. Apart from the personal story in the article, the notion of ethnic groups that we practical never hear of is really interesting. While it makes sense that there were Chinese people in Mexico, it's just something which I never actively realized. There should be a  book of ethnic conflicts which never make the well-known history books, if there isn't one already.

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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.

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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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Why leave the West for India?

Why leave the West for India? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rising numbers of people of Indian origin born in the West are moving to the country their parents left decades ago in search of opportunity and a cultural connection, reports the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan.


Since 2005, the Indian government has been encouraging people of Indian descent and former Indian nationals to return to India.  For many Indians living in the UK, there are more and better economic opportunities for them within India.   Migrants have many reasons for moving (including cultural factors), but the primary pull factor is most certainly India's ascendant importance in the global economy and rising IT industries. 

 

Tags: India, South Asia, migration, immigration, Europe, colonialism, unit 2 population

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:37 PM

As the article says, India is encouraging more people of Indian descent to return to India because of the opportunities that have become increasingly available within the country due to its  westernization . Aside from the corruption and poverty that are in India, the country has not seen any signs of these opportunities stopping.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:42 PM

With the rise in globalization and the IT industry, it is obvious that there is opportunity for success.  Many traveled to the US for economic opportunity, however many companies and IT departments are being outsourced to India, thus taking jobs away from the US.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 11, 2015 11:16 AM

This phenomenon is a direct result of the rise of the Indian economy. Before the IT industry began to set up shop in India, returning to India was economically unfeasible. The development of the Indian economy has made India an attractive place to migrate to. If you are in the IT industry, there is more opportunity for you in India, than there is in the west. Culture is obviously another major pull for Indian immigrants. Throughout history populations have always sought to return to their native land. Especially first generation immigrants, who often never fully assimilate into the culture of their new nation.

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The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation

The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Kauffman Foundation's Samuel Arbesman on his new book, The Half-Life of Facts.


This is an interview, Samuel Arbesman,the author of The Half-Life of Facts explains how population density and place matter in forming a creative economic workforce. Urban centers act as drivers of innovation and advancements and attract the more ambitious and daring workers. Additionally, this map on the expansion of the printing press (discussed in the interview) is also a great map to show how technological innovations can spur cultural diffusion.


Tags: technology, diffusion, urban, labor, migration, book review.

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Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | Geography Education | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:04 PM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, September 30, 2014 4:04 PM

Remember this is based on a % of the total population, and not total #. Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list? 

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Russians are leaving the country in droves

Russians are leaving the country in droves | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over a bottle of vodka and a traditional Russian salad of pickles, sausage and potatoes tossed in mayonnaise, a group of friends raised their glasses and wished Igor Irtenyev and his family a happy journey to Israel.


My regional class has been learning about Russia this week and when I first started teaching a few years ago, I would teach that Russia had a population of 145 million.  Today it is 141 million and part of that is due to migrants leaving a country that they see as lacking in economic opportunities and political freedoms (another part of the story is that birth rates plummeted after the collapse of the Soviet Union in what demographers have called the "Russian Cross").  In the last few years the population appears to have stabilized, but there are still many who do not see a vibrant future from themselves within Russia.  


Tags: Russia, migration, Demographics, immigration, unit 2 population.


Via Nathan Parrish
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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:44 PM

In the last 10 years about 1.25 million russians have emigrated out of Russia, but the way they do it is interesting. When they leave they dont sell their houses, or aparments, or cars they simply lock their doors and quietly slip away to the airports at night. The reasons for leaving are different thought, some are leaving because the prime minister is expected to return while some are leaving because of the awful econonmy. Either way the massive amounts of emigration is leading to a higher death rate then birth rate overall. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:23 AM

This article from a couple years ago is about Russian emigration. A large number of Russians were leaving the country for better economic opportunity. Some cite the overbearing rule of Putin, but the pay in other countries is just better than what Russia can offer. This was particularly the case for the more educated, another instance of "brain drain" hurting a nation which is already in trouble.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:00 PM

Migration occurs for many reasons. People move from country to country every day. Leaving Russia was this families choice and moving to Israel can have an impact on them greater than if they were to stay in Russia.

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The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Not every state is equally impacted by migration, and the demographic profile of migrants is different for every state. This is an online mapping tool to search a large database that can give the user state specific information about the impact of economics and politics based on migration from Latin America and Asia on any given state.


Tags: Immigration, unit 2 population, migration, economic, statistics, mapping, political.

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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 26, 2014 12:43 PM

Unit 2 population and migration 

This map shows the population of migrants in certain states and compares them to other states. This demographic specifically highlights Texas and shows its migrant information. Texas has the highest immigrant income out of all of the states. Also Texas has very few naturalized citizens who used to be an immigrant.

This map relates to unit 2 because it shows the illegal immigration. And immigration theories. This proves ravensteins laws correct because it shows how people move a short distance to migrate, knowing that most migrants to America come from Latin America. This map is a great example of ravensteins theories and unit 2

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Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America

Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Although English is America’s common tongue, immigrants’ efforts to learn it present challenges to institutions and individuals alike. These graphics compare regions, schools, and communities where newcomers have settled to learn and integrate.


The interactive map feature of language and the accompanying spatial patterns reveal much about the major migrational patterns in the United States.


Tags: Migration, USA, statistics, language, immigration, unit 2 population.

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Latino boom makes Orlando proving ground for Obama

Latino boom makes Orlando proving ground for Obama | Geography Education | Scoop.it
President Obama and Mitt Romney are set to make appearances beginning Thursday at a major gathering of Latino officials and activists...

 

A core component of the 2012 U.S. presidential elections will be the demographic profile of both the Republican and Democratic Parties’ power base. For most of American history, the African-American population was the largest minority second to the Caucasian minority. Since the 2000 census, the Latino population has overtaken the African-American population as the largest minority in the U.S.  How does this impact both parties?  What are the strategies of both parties to appeal from a diverse set of voters?   How does the immigration issue shape 'identity politics?'

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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 12, 2012 3:40 PM
Unlike African Americans there is much more differentiation within the Latino population which contains within itself many nationalities with competing priorities. Due to this wide variation of interest it will likely be much harder for either the Democrats or Republicans to gain the support of the entire group. Therefor this question may revolve around what kind of people or concerns will both parties use to gain the support of the majority ofdifferent interest groups within Americas Latino population for the 2012 election.
GIS student's comment, September 13, 2012 9:25 AM
The problem ahead for the republicans is that many of their views and opinions go against the ideas of many Latinos. According to the article Romney has many struggles with Latino community because his views are the opposite of what the majority of the Latino voters consider. On the opposite side Obama has a difficult road ahead as well. Does he focus his campaign more on the large minority or does he concentrate on the majority which could cause a shift in the minority. Regardless Florida has been a primary example of identity politics ever since the election 2008 where some areas were no longer considered battleground areas.
Nicholas Rose's comment, September 13, 2012 10:05 AM
Well, I would like to say is that the Hispanic minority is the majority of the Florida population including major cities like Orlando which is mentioned in the article and Miami. Historically, Florida was a Spanish colony which was led by Juan Ponce De Leon. Even though that Florida is usually a Republican state when it comes to voting but I think that it'll be more of a major impact for the Democratic party than the republican party because of the immigration issues that President Obama was paying attention to throughout his presidency so far.