Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Cityscapes of Chicago

Cityscape Chicago II is a personal timelapse piece that I have worked on periodically over the past two years. The inspiration behind the project ties similarly with the original piece. As the city of Chicago continues to change, my fascination with it grows as well. The goal for me is always to capture the city in a unique way from new perspectives, and to continue exploring it.


Tags: Chicago, urban, place, landscape,  video.

Seth Dixon's insight:

A little closer to my home and workplace, here is a similar video about Providence, Rhode Island.

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Geographic Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles, these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, “two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.” The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” (trailer) and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” (trailer) both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is not appropriate for the K-12 classroom viewing).


Tags: place, spacesport, California, landscapevideo, popular culture, music.

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Beautiful Physical Landscapes

"#TheRidge is the brand new film from Danny Macaskill... For the first time in one of his films Danny climbs aboard a mountain bike and returns to his native home of the Isle of Skye in Scotland to take on a death-defying ride along the notorious Cuillin Ridgeline."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I loved Danny Macaskill's earlier video in Scotland's cultural landscapes, and this extreme sports clip is infused with gorgeous physical landscapes.  


Tag: Scotland, sport, landscape.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:37 AM

Beautiful Physical Landscapes

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2014 7:37 PM

Engage boys with Landforms and Landscapes - intro video!

Geography with Mrs Dunn's curator insight, January 10, 3:33 AM

Place – what does the place look like? What could the place be used for?

Space - how could this space be significant?

Environment – what type/s of environments can you see in this video? How is the relationship between people and environments important?

Interconnection – what elements of interconnection can you see in this video? What evidence of the interaction between the spheres can you see?

Scale – how is this environment important on a variety of scales? (Local/national/global)

Sustainability – how can people use this, and other landscapes, sustainably?

Change – how do you think this landscape has changed over time? What has caused those changes? Predict what future changes may occur in this landscape.

 

Further information:

http://www.redbull.com/au/en/bike/stories/1331682379336/danny-macaskill-trial-biking-video-the-ridge

 

http://skyeguides.co.uk/summer-activities/ridge-traverses/

 

http://www.cuillinridge.co.uk/index.html

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The Transformation of Burning Man

The Transformation of Burning Man | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Burning Man takes place at the end of August every year in the barren and remote Black Rock Desert of Nevada. The weeklong festival is described by its organization as “an experiment in community, art, radical self-expression, and radical self-reliance.” Earth-bound photographers have chronicled the legacy of art, technology, design, and fashion at the event over the years, but we at Skybox wanted to know if we could capture the transformation of the city from space, with our constellation of SkySats. This is the result:

A full-fledged city of population 70,000, “Black Rock City” is built up in a matter of days, experienced for a single week, and disassembled just as quickly, leaving no trace."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Last week I posted about Burning Man, noting that the landscapes in this experimental culture are inherently ephemeral and fleeting.  High resolution satellite imagery has captured the quick rise and fall of the Black Rock City.  Perhaps the term 'rise and fall' might not aptly describe the formation and dismantling of a city of 70,000 people; it is more like the ebb and flow of the tide, certain to return again.  


Tags architectureimages, art, landscape, geospatial, remote sensing.

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CT Blake's curator insight, September 19, 2014 12:45 PM

An interesting view of the passage of short amounts of time and human interaction in a transitory urban scene-- Burning Man.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 21, 2014 10:12 PM

I have a friend from Nevada and he explained how excited he was to go to Burning Man and he was almost appalled when I asked what the big deal was.  I had no idea that this huge event is put up and taken down in such a short period of time, all that quick work for a weeks worth of entertainment.  The idea to document the construction and destruction through satellite was an excellent idea, as it is more meaningful to someone than writing that it was constructed in so many days and taken down in this many.  

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:39 AM

Burning Man is a massive and creative counterculture festival, and its surprising to learn that the majority of the camps are created by participants of the festival in whatever manner they choose. It is amazing that such a huge number of people can flock to such a remote location and in a very short amount of time build a complex, organized settlement, all for the purpose of a festival dedicated to independence and expression. What is popularly seen as a drugged out Mecca for the weird is carried out in a shockingly complex manner, and by working with the local infrastructure and providing one of their own the festival is able to be carried out year after year.

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Digital mapping uncovers ‘super henge’ that dwarfed Stonehenge

Digital mapping uncovers ‘super henge’ that dwarfed Stonehenge | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every summer solstice, tens of thousands of people throng to Stonehenge, creating a festival-like atmosphere at the 4,400-year-old stone monument. For the 2015 solstice, they will have a bit more room to spread out. A just-completed four-year project to map the vicinity of Stonehenge reveals a sprawling complex that includes 17 newly discovered monuments and signs of a 1.5-kilometre-around ‘super henge’.

The digital map — made from high-resolution radar and magnetic and laser scans that accumulated several terabytes of data — shatters the picture of Stonehenge as a desolate and exclusive site that was visited by few, says Vincent Gaffney, an archaeologist at the University of Birmingham, UK, who co-led the effort."


Tags: Mapping, geospatial, remote sensing, landscape.

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Renata Hill's comment, September 16, 2014 5:14 PM
Fascinating. Thank you for posting!
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This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years

This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The USGS says sea-level rise and sinking could claim up to 4,677 square miles of land along the coast if the state doesn’t implement major restoration plans.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a gorgeous interactive map which pulls together some high  high quality source materials on a wide range of issues to look at this environmental issues of this region in a holistic manner. 


Tagsmappingcoastal, environment, erosion, landscape.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 9:23 AM

(North America topic 2)
This interactive map is an excellent tool for researching how low-lying delta areas such as southern Mississippi have changed over recent years, and for what underlying reasons. Although human activity has been largely responsible for the loss of valuable marshland (land development, canals, levees), it's nice to know that in some cases human activity has actually helped to promote it, even if it was not originally intended to do so.

It makes you think: what other unintended consequences human actions are having on the environment in other places and on other scales?

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:24 PM

Is very crazy that soon these land will be gone. What really makes me worry is that in a few years all these land in Louisiana will be gone, what is going to happen to all these people who is living right know in these areas? What action government will take? This is a very worrying situation.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:04 AM

If I lived in Louisiana, I wouldn’t settle down near the coast. 2,000 square miles will be lost in about 80 years. The water will have risen to 4.3 feet, and Louisiana has an average height of 3 feet. That leaves everything outside of the protective levees underwater in due time. Many pipelines that serve 90% of the nation’s offshore energy production and 30% of its gas and oil supply that goes to 31 different states and over 2 million people will all need to find a new place to live if this continues. Once home to 700 people south of New Orleans is now home to nearly 15 residents. The water level has already been ruining homes for people in Louisiana.  

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Mystery of Death Valley's 'Sailing' Stones Solved

Mystery of Death Valley's 'Sailing' Stones Solved | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There's a place in Death Valley National Park where a mystery that has puzzled scientists and park visitors for decades finally has been solved.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The video in this article (weather.com) nicely explains how the non-aerodynamic rocks of Death Valley's Racetrack Playa move, leaving behind their trail in the hot desert.  Numerous attempts using GPS receivers (NatGeo.com) and good ol' fashioned observations have been made, but observing ice in Death Valley is so rare that no one had ever seen it until now (phys.org).  On very rare occasions, when it rains in the region, water will accumulate in the playa (discovermagazine.com).  If the wind is powerful and consistent enough, the wind will push the panels of ice against these rocks and over time, the ice floes will push these rocks, leaving behind distinctive trails (latimes.com). This perfect combination of water, wind, ice and heat creates a remarkable signature on the landscape (livescience.com).


Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, deserterosion, weather and climate, landscape.

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Riaz Ahmad Baboojee's curator insight, August 29, 2014 12:59 AM

Think

Greg Russak's curator insight, August 29, 2014 9:30 AM

It's probably not what you think. It wasn't what I thought.....then again, I had no idea what was happening.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:46 PM

It's amazing to see that even though we have been on this planet for so long, there are stilll mysteries such as this. Tjis could have taken year s to solve but looking at the picture in the slides at the bottom of the article, it seems like this group of scientists knew exactly how to figure this out. this all happens becasue of geography and where these rocks are in the world that make them move around. Iis in a dried up lake pond that freezes over at night to create a layer of ice strong enough to help the rocks move around at night. This discovery took 2 whole years to figure out, but was vey much worth it in the end. 

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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Geography explores more than just what countries control a certain territory and what landforms are there.  Geography explores the spatial manifestations of power and how place is crafted to fit a particular vision.  Homeless people are essentially always 'out of place.'  This article from the Atlantic and this one from the Guardian share similar things: that urban planners actively design places that will discourage loitering which is undesirable to local businesses.  This gallery shows various defensive architectural tactics to make certain people feel 'out of place.'  Just to show that not all urban designs are anti-homeless, this bench is one that is designed to help the homeless.     


Tags: urbanplanning, architecture, landscape, place.

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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 2014 8:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 2014 3:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U7

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Alluvial Fans

Alluvial Fans | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When streams emerge from mountains, they often spread out and deposit sediment in a distinctive pattern known as an alluvial fan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In dry areas of interior drainage (such as Central Asia and the Great Basin in the U.S.), the human settlements are often clustered along the foothills of the mountains near landforms called alluvial fans.  Take time to analyze this image (and this one as well); in alluvial fans and the agricultural patterns that people create on them, we can see some striking geometric and spatial configurations that show how human settlements are highly dependent of the physical environment.   


Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, Kazakhstan, Central Asialandscape.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:27 PM

These fans are like a good Delta. People live between the mountains and the desert. Water runs down the mountains making a fan to where now a little distance away farms are produced and good vegetation.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:29 AM

these are the fascinating geographic anomalies. its amazing the civilizations that rise up on earth, but are totally alien to us, even in the age of instant communication.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 12:02 PM

An interesting little piece of Kazakhstan geography here. I find it fascinating that not only are these unique to deserts due to low vegetation but that they become perfect for agriculture (an irony of sorts I suppose). I also rather enjoy how the agricultural areas are spread out like a fan like the water runoff from the mountain. One key feature I didn't notice until I read it was the railroad that goes right through the fields to reach the town on the outskirts of the Alluvial fan. I am particularly curious to how many areas actually use this to make the desert a hospitable place for habitation (since it is usually a bad idea due to lack of water and food). It would also have been more interesting if the culture of the people who inhabit these places was discussed since it would likely be different in other places since they are only relying on 1 main water source. Geographically and historically I can imagine that places like this would have also been key strategic locations especially when traversing the arid areas.

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade
Seth Dixon's insight:

The cultural landscapes of neighborhoods can change quickly as larger global economic forces restructure the places.  This is a great gallery of photos from the Smithsonian to document these changes in New York City.  Many mourn the passing of what once was as the landscape continues to be made and remade but subsequent generations. 


Tags: culture, landscape, NYCeconomic, urban, place, neighborhood.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 12, 2014 7:28 AM

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas

Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thirteen years after the Bamian Buddhas were blasted into rubble, opinion is split on whether to leave them as is, rebuild them, or make copies of them.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video and article work together to show a 'behind-the-scenes' glimpse of this heritage site, or the remnants of the old memorial which is an iconic part of the cultural landscape in their own right but for very different reasons.  This is a great example of sequent occupance and some of the difficulties in preserving heritage.  Some argue that by restoring the Buddha it will undo some of the damage done by the Taliban and create a tourist destination; others think that the damaged Buddha is a poignant reminder of problems with 'topocide' and religious intolerance. 


Questions to Ponder: What do you think should become of this place?  How come?    


Tags: Afghanistan, politicalculture, Central Asialandscape, perspective.

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 2015 12:46 PM

Most people often forget that the Silk Road passed into Central Asia and the Middle East from East Asia.  This means that along the road, travelers often put things that reminded them of home.  The Buddha statues that once existed in Afghanistan are an example of this.  They were in fact labeled a world heritage site.  Sadly, the Buddhas had been ravaged throughout history by radical arabs.  This is because their religion frowns upon (actually forbids) idols, which they considered the statues to be.  Although they had been tempered with for many years, the Taliban finally decided to blow them up in 2001.  Now, there are differing opinions across various countries as to whether they should be rebuild or not.  Afghanistan believes that they should be rebuilt so the government can claim a symbolic victory over the Taliban.  Unesco wants a restoration done right, so for now it won't allow rebuilding to occur.  Germans tried to rebuild them, but Unesco blocked it from happening.  South Korea, Italy and Japan are all willing to donate money, but have no mention of the statues.  I believe that the statues should be rebuilt, as the article points out monuments were rebuilt in France after Protestants burnt down many old Gothic Cathedrals.  I also believe it is necessary because we cannot let the culture of hate that the Taliban believes in to win.  Average Muslims realize that the statues have historical significance and that they do not need to worship Buddha to respect that this site was 1,500 years old.  I also think it would send a strong message from the Afghan government if the statues were rebuilt because it would show they, like the article states, are not going to let the Taliban rule their country.

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:42 PM

I find it interesting that other countries are divided.  Why are they deciding the future for this country?  They can't seem to get out of their ways to come up with a real solution.  Its unfortunate.  

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:40 AM

this is a reminder of what extremism can do to ancient works of art that they view as heretical. these ancient, massive statues were carved out of living rock by ancient Buddhists, and had withstood the test of time until Afghan terrorists blew them up.

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Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims

Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A slice of rock removed from the mainland near the island of Utoeya is the winning design for a memorial to commemorate the victims of Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Monuments are not just in a place...they can create place and place can infuse added meaning to a memorial.  This is a great example of the interplay between memorials, place, artistic and cultural meanings. 

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, March 7, 2014 3:43 AM

Il 22 luglio 2011 il fanatico cristiano Anders Breivik ha ucciso 69 ragazzi nell'isola di Utøya in Norvegia e procurato la morte di altre 8 persone in un attentato con esplosivo a Oslo. Una tragedia che ha colpito tutto il mondo e ha lasciato impietrita la civilissima Norvegia.

Per ricordare le vittime di questo massacro sarà creato un monumento. Questo il design selezionato. Un monumento che riesce a riprodurre in modo fisico il dolore procurato dall'esperienza di chi ha dovuto provare in prima persona la perdita improvvisa, brutale e permanente di tante persone care.

JoseMªRiveros's curator insight, March 7, 2014 2:36 PM

Espectacular !!!!

Un trozo de roca retirado de la parte continental cerca de la isla de Utoya. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 12, 2014 11:32 AM

This is a creative and beautiful idea for a monument. I have never come across a design similar to this one. This is a great example of taking advantage of the surroundings around you, such as the water, rocks and trees. 

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A photograph (or landscape, map, etc.) is not an innocent reflection of reality.  They can be carefully crafted to tell a story which might reflect the bigger picture and your ideological framework--but it just as easily might obscure some important contexts and truths.  I use these images at the beginning of the semester to discuss the bias inherent in our own perspectives as I try to infuse my classroom with a variety of lenses with which to view different regions (images found here).


Tags: images, landscape, perspective, regions.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 2014 6:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 2014 4:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:35 PM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Baltimore's painted screens

"Jan Crawford explores a unique folk art tradition going back 100 years - once seen on nearly every row house in the working class neighborhoods of Baltimore, as artists today once again embrace the tradition of painted window screens, an authentic connection to the city's past."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is tremendous example of an urban cultural landscape that is distinctive to a certain place (Baltimore) and a particular time period.  The practice of painting landscape scene on window screens began over 100 years ago, as a way to beat the heat, but still afford some form of privacy.  This aesthetic emerged out of particular set of cultural, technological, and economic factors. What was once common is now perceived as a folk art that is a worth preserving because it is a marker of the local heritage.  This is an excellent example to demonstrate a sense of place that can develop within a community.  This video has been added to my ESRI StoryMap that spatially organizes place-based videos for the geography classroom (68 and counting).   

Tags: place, landscapeart, folk cultures, videoculture, community.

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Kevin Barker's curator insight, October 24, 2014 9:22 AM

An excellent example of a localized cultural landscape characteristic that is a result of cultural diffusion that formed for economic as well as environmental factors.

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The Tower of London Remembers

The Tower of London Remembers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Be a part of the Tower of London’s major centenary commemoration for the outbreak of the First World War.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The news of this art installation this summer captivated the media.  Art transforms the place, and the place breaths additional layers of meaning into the work of art. The result was an highly evocative and poignant landscape created to be a living reminder of multiple historical events and the wounds that war can inflict on a national consciousness.  


Tags architecture, art, landscape, LondonUK, historical, war.

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Fire and Weather

"This is what a pyrocumulus cloud caused by the burning of over 28,000+ acres of forest looked like as the sun set.  In person as these clouds were changing it wasn't all that noticeable when the huge plumes of smoke changed shape, but thanks to the magic of a time-lapse we get to behold the violent nature of the smoke cloud, including a storm cloud that emerged behind the main pyrocumulus."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Seeing this fire essential create it's own weather system is riveting.  While this scene can be seen as beautiful on the macro-scale, it is horrific on the ground where the fire ravaged physical and human landscapes alike.  Here is some satellite imagery of the fire. 

 

Tagsdisasters,  weather and climateCalifornia, landscape, time lapsevideo.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 24, 2014 7:10 PM

Great application of key factors involved in weather systems.

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Louisiana Loses Its Boot

Louisiana Loses Its Boot | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The boot-shaped state isn’t shaped like that anymore. So, we revised its iconic outline to reflect the truth about a sin…
Seth Dixon's insight:

Maps shape how we think about places.  In mapping, we can reveal or conceal important pieces of information but sometimes the phenomena don't fit the easy binaries.  In most places there is land, a coastline and then water (simple enough), but Louisiana's coastline is much more complicated with large regions being more of a coastal zone than a neat line.  That accounts for some of the inaccuracies mapping Louisiana, but some lies are so convenient, that many people want the fiction to continue.  It is comforting to think about places as permanent, and admitting that it isn't is acknowledging that there might be a problem.  As stated in this article, "the boot is at best an inaccurate approximation of Louisiana’s true shape and, at worst, an irresponsible lie."  To explore the issue yourself, this gorgeous interactive map pulls together some high quality source materials on a wide range of issues to look at this environmental issues of this region in a holistic manner.


Tagsmappingcoastalenvironment, erosion, landscape., physical, fluvial.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:52 AM

(North America topic 7)
Just like geography and history textbooks become obsolete the day they're published (thanks to Professors Dixon and Bonin for the phrase!), the same can be said for maps and icons.

This article uses the example of Louisiana's state highway signs, which show the outline of the state... well, according to data from the 1930s. While an updated sign isn't as pretty, it does bring about the truth that the landscape is changing, and on a larger scale this is true for the entire world, especially with influence from development and climate change.
However, I can relate to the other side of the argument too. Tossing the old LA symbol would toss a historical reminder of what once was. The same can be said for New Hampshire's Old Man of the Mountain road signs and license plates. I'd hate to see the profile removed, especially since what is symbolizes still lives on in the hearts of many residents and visitors, including myself.

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Burning Man and Ephemeral Geographies

"An aerial perspective on Burning Man 2013, in Black Rock Playa, NV"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This annual arts festival with a strong counter-cultural ethos literally is an experiment in producing alternative urban and cultural geographies that reject normative regulations embedded within societies. These geographies created last only about a week, as an escape from the regular strictures of society. Burning Man celebrates alternative spiritualities and creates monuments to impermanence while allowing people to wear zany costumes. Many feel that in leaving behind ‘the real world’ they find their true home at Burning Man. The ephemeral alternative geographies then fade back into the desert but not without creating a visually remarkable place. Some feel that the festival has become too popular and famous to be what it truly was intended to be as the rich and famous descend on the playa as well.


Questions to Ponder: Part of Burning Man’s success is due to its impermanence; if this community were created to exist year-round, would it still work? Why or why not? Why do festivals like this attract so many? What does it culturally say about the participants and the societies that they leave behind?


Tags: communityplace, architectureimages, art, landscape.

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Barbara Goebel's curator insight, September 13, 2014 11:58 AM

Fascinating topic for research...connect it to ecology themes, economics, psychology...what else?

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Beautiful Landscapes

"Here's a collection of timelapses I shot during the past year. Amazing landscapes from California, Arizona, Bahamas, Florida, Japan, Taiwan to Italy."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Part of a teaching geography is showing the wonders of the Earth in as way that will hopefully spark some awe, curiosity, and desire to see more of the planet.  I think this video is a nice primer for that.  


Tags: landscape, time lapsevideo.

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A wide-angle view of fragile Earth

A wide-angle view of fragile Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In this image-filled talk, Yann Arthus-Bertrand displays his three most recent projects on humanity and our habitat -- stunning aerial photographs in his series "The Earth From Above," personal interviews from around the globe featured in his web project "6 billion Others," and his soon-to-be-released movie, "Home," which documents human impact on the environment through breathtaking video.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've linked galleries of the artistic, aerial photography of Yann Arthus-Bertrand several times before.  In this Ted Talk, you can hear what motivates his artistic vision and the global perspectives that he wants to bring to the fore.  You can also watch the 90-minute video 'Home' that he discusses in the talk here.    

 

Tags: images, art, worldwideTEDenvironment, video.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 25, 2014 10:07 AM

Useful for Human Impact DCI!

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Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline

Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Beaches are dynamic, living landscapes. The coast off of Chatham, Massachusetts, provides a prime example of beach evolution.
Seth Dixon's insight:

To quote coastal geologist Robert Oldale, "Many people view coastal erosion as a problem that needs to be addressed and, if possible, prevented.  However, storm and wave erosion along the shore of Cape Cod has been going on for thousands of years and will likely continue for thousands of years more. It is a natural process that allows the Cape to adjust to rising sea level. Erosion is only a peril to property. If we build on the shore, we must accept the fact that sooner or later coastal erosion will take the property away.”


Tagscoastal, remote sensing, mappingerosion, landscape.

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Sam Burden's curator insight, June 16, 2014 7:40 AM

The NASA Earth Observatory is a teaching tool used to assist educators in teaching students about the environmental, including natural hazards with visualizations depicting the date and time these vast changes in the climate occurs. There are multiple global maps which  depict data over a period of time which can be used as a tool to see the effects of global warming it’s the implications on the environment on a global scale. Animations, videos and side by side images are also available to teachers to show how sustainable choices or designs can influence our environment. I really enjoyed looking at all of the real-world images on this site and it opened my eyes to how creating a more sustainable environment could influence our world on a global scale. 

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What is halal meat?

What is halal meat? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There have been calls for clearer labelling of halal products in shops, restaurants and takeaways. But what is halal food? And why are campaigners so concerned?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

I know just enough Arabic to read the word Halal (حلال) and know that it means permissible, the opposite of Haram (حَرَام‎) which means forbidden or illegal.  In the context of meat, it means meat that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people).  Today, Halal is becoming an important issue within the European Union for two main reasons: 1) more Muslims are migrating to Europe and 2) Europeans are searching for less artificial food products.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe.  If you want to see the inner workings of a Halal slaughterhouse in New York, this video will show you what it is like.   

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 17, 2014 7:14 AM

Halal means permissible, the opposite of Haram  which means forbidden or illegal. 


Halal meat means that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people). 


Within the European Union more Muslims are migrating to Europe.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe. - From Seth Dixon

Kendra King's curator insight, February 27, 2015 12:07 AM

 

I am not surprised some European governments aren’t taking a stronger stance, but I think the market might sort itself out in this instance. This issue is another battle of a minority group trying to keep their culture in a different country. Muslims, who are typically discriminated against in Europe, would like there to be more clear labeling, along with Jews (another minority). As mentioned in the article, most countries (excluding Denmark) allow suppliers to kill without stunning for religious purposes, but  buyers are having trouble identifying the meat they can eat provided by these suppliers since most Europeans don't need to know this information. The author pointed out that the economic trend is showing that Muslims have enough of a "spending power" that the slaughterhouses will want to respond to their needs in order to profit. It would be nice for the government to step in, but I really doubt that will happen given how this group is typically marginalized. So in this instance, the Muslims are lucky that money motivates.  

 

Overall, I sympathize with the Muslim's desire to want more labeling even though I don't agree with it. The reason I am against eating meat rests largely with how the animals are treated from their time on the farm being raised to the time they are slaughtered. I myself wish their was more information in regards to this so I could eat meat in good conscious. Killing without stunning isn’t the most humane, but that is what  these people's conscience need due to their religion. So denying or harshly judging this desire would just be plain hypocritical of me. Therefore, I hope the economy can actually take care of itself.  

 

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Soviet Bus Stops

Soviet Bus Stops | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Photographer Christopher Herwig has covered more than 30,000 km by car, bike, bus and taxi in 13 countries discovering and documenting these unexpected treasures of modern art. From the shores of the Black Sea to the endless Kazakh steppe, the bus stops show the range of public art from the Soviet era and give a rare glimpse into the creative minds of the time."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a delightful glimpse into a time gone by, and what makes it even more surprising is that few would expect such creative architecture to dot the cultural landscape of the old Soviet Union.  I was recently looking at a photo gallery of old Russian Orthodox churches and just like these Soviet bus stops, they are perfect subjects for classic cultural landscape studies.  Geography students can analyze and interpret the cultural, political and economic material landscape as this photographer has.  What do these elements of the landscape mean?  How does it make us re-evaluate the society that created them?   


Tags: Russia, culture, landscape.
 

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 2015 6:04 PM

A new way to observe and appreciate architecture and creativity from a different culture.  I love the idea of the book to show how something so ordinary and overlooked in everyday society like a bus stop can be turned into works of art.  It would be cool to see this inspire other artists to turn other modern day things into cool works of art.  How awesome would this have been 20 years ago if they did things like this to phone booths?

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 21, 2015 1:18 PM

This article is a collage of soviet bustops, which happen to be extravagant. Some of them are ancient looking made out of cement. Some have highly decorated sculptures of the sickle and hammer soviet sign. Others are large sheltered areas to protect citizens. By looking at the high scale of bustops, and large amount, it shows that the population must use a lot of bus transport. Some of these bustop are very nice looking, elegant, unique, or a distinct representation of Russian History. It is unique to see a different spin on a Bustop, something that seems so repetitive at Kennedy Plaza here in Providence.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 4:55 PM

for as monstrous as the soviet union was, they did care about appearances and the safety of their people. these bus stops show some of the wonderful aspects of soviet architecture. in addition, you can see bus stops in the middle of nowhere. this is the same mindset that made the soviets build nuclear shelters for the majority of their populace.

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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...
Seth Dixon's insight:

A new perspective can change our perception of reality, as demonstrated by this delightful photo gallery. 


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 21, 2014 11:34 AM

I think it's awesome to see the past mixed with the present, and realizing how our imagination adds to the "mystery" of places.  However, seeing things in context truly changes perception - how could this be brought to your students?  Fascinating.  

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 2014 11:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.

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A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design

A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ukraine's Independence Square, and the revolutionary dimensions of public spaces.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article gives some background on the political purposes behind urban planning and public squares that carry cultural meaning.  While Ukraine is the reason for delving into the topic, the article explores the politicization of public squares in various regional and historical contexts.  The image above shows how monuments, despite their 'official' meaning, can be rearticulated and reinterpreted as other audiences inscribe meaning into the landscape.  

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 2014 3:21 PM

Very interesting article about public spaces transformed by public protest.