Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Geography Education | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This photo gallery would be stunningly gorgeous if it weren't horrifically terrifying.  When the landscape changes this dramatically in a short time span, watch out.  See another photo gallery here, but this gallery from the Boston Globe, shows a more humanistic side of the story. 


Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, geomorphology, erosion, images.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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National Geographic Found

National Geographic Found | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.  We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location."

Seth Dixon's insight:

How have I not found National Geographic FOUND until now?  The curators post approximately 2 pictures a day that generally have never been published before; the result is an archive that is a wonderfully eclectic treasure trove.  There are simply too many great teaching images to share them individually.  Pictured above is the Sutherland Falls which thunders down a 1,904-foot drop from Lake Quill in New Zealand (January 1972, Photo by James L. Amos).  I consider National Geographic FOUND as a must see and will include it in my list of best scoops (filed under the tag zbestofzbest). 


Tags: perspective, National Geographic. images, zbestofzbest.

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Ryan G Soares's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:25 AM

Very Nice Photography.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:31 AM

These pictures are awesome. It would be nice to know the locations of some of the pictures to compare them to images now.

 

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:05 PM

this is amazing!

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Density and Emptiness

Density and Emptiness | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the end of 2012 I travelled to USA to experience something new. And it was something I didn't expect: emptiness and density.  'Merge' is the last part of a project series 'Empty, Dense, Merge' which explores two opposite feelings through the photos of places located in USA.  In this project two opposite places are merged into one: New York City, where, it seems like everyone wants to live there, and Grand Canyon / Death Valley, which are unlivable."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is geographically inspired art at it's finest.  It goes beyond making beautiul jewelry with maps or showing majestic vistas of natural landscapes; the artistic concept that motivated the photographer was geographic in nature.  Population density is highly clustered leaving great spaces of open, empty, unpopulated land and some major cities that are jam-packed with human activity and settlements.  Merging both of these concepts into the same image produced this series of 6 images (as seen in this Atlantic Cities article).


Tags: art, density, NYC, landscape.

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oyndrila's comment, July 21, 2013 3:37 AM
Excellent visual resource to convey the concepts.
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:14 PM

Great photo combining the U.S.'s great spaces with its metropolisis'.

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:17 PM
Amazing it almost looks lkike we, in the US, are living in a huge bowl
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Exploring farms from above

Exploring farms from above | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Stunning gallery of 15 images depicting agricultural landscapes.  Shown above are cut flower fields in Carlsbad, California circa 1989."

Seth Dixon's insight:

"Aerial photographer Alex MacLean estimates he has spent about 6,000 hours in the sky photographing American farms.  His unique perspective depicts the dramatically changing agricultural landscape in the U.S., something he has been drawn to since he started flying nearly 40 years ago.  'I’ve been photographing agricultural lands since I started flying, in the early 1970s,' he says. 'I was drawn to the aesthetics of farmland, in part because of its natural response to environmental conditions, climates, soils and topography…A lot of what I photograph is through discovery of seeing crops, seeing patterns.' 


Tags: agriculture, landscape, images.

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Mary Rack's curator insight, May 23, 2013 10:28 AM

These are really beautiful and interesting, but I wish  photos could also reveal what substances are used on the land: fertilizers, pest killers, etc. I will go to his site and see if he addresses that. 

Mary Rack's comment, May 23, 2013 10:35 AM
MacLean's http://www.alexmaclean.com/ is a rich treasure trove of beauty and information! I could lose myself in it for the rest of the day. I recommend it to all thoughtful people.
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Life in North Korea

"David Guttenfelder, chief Asia photographer for the Associated Press wire service, sent these photos from North Korea straight to his Instagram account (in real time), a significant feat in a country where access is strictly controlled and where very few have Internet access."

Seth Dixon's insight:

On a side note, last week I posted about the joint South Korean/North Korea Industrial complex, essentially saying that as long as that remains open, this war talk from North Korea is all bravado.  Well, that industrial complex is now shut down


TagsNorth Korea.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:49 PM

These pictures offer a glimpse into North Korea, and show how outdated and old the country looks. The roads are mostly empty and any artwork is obvious pro-Kim propaganda. Some pictures feature caricatures of American soldiers, showing how they are used as a common enemy for the people to rally against. 

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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."


Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a compilation of 42 photos that highlight ideas of  population growth, urbanization and sustainability.  Pictured above is the favela Joaquim de Queiros, a hillside neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. 

 

Tags: population, images, unit 2 population.

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Roman M's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 12:49 PM

I saw the pictures. It is amazing how peoples back yards are all different. From water to dirt to garbage to no back yards at all. I was commenting on the fact with the population growth there is only one way to build and that is up. Then i saw the pictures of the High risers and how tall they were and so close together. It is a no wonder people live in a stressful environment. There is nothing like living in a wide open land lot with grass in Wyoming or Montana but that sure will change in the next 50 years.

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Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

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chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:33 PM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
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Powerful Nor'easter Coming Together

Powerful Nor'easter Coming Together | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A massive winter storm is coming together as two low pressure systems are merging over the U.S. East Coast. A satellite image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Feb. 8 shows a western frontal system approaching the coastal low pressure area.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This NASA "image of the day" of the Nor'eastern shows the scope and impact of the storm quite vividly. 

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megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:34 PM

the picture shows the storm surge coming through to the North East and how the pressure builds.

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Flag Food

Flag Food | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This picture is a compilation of foods Produced at the Sydney International Food Festival.  If you want to see more "food flags," see this previous post with links to the ingredients and a key to the flags (if you can't guess some of them). 


Tags: food, art.

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dilaycock's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:02 PM

Now here's an interesting activity for students!

Mark Slusher's curator insight, February 9, 2013 8:46 AM

Now THIS is geographical food for thought! Talk about conquering a nation!

Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:15 PM
I love that! It's so creative. Whoever came up with the idea to do this as an advertisement for the international food festival did a great job. They all look so delicious. Food festivals are a great way to experience other cultures.
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Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Pictured above is Lake Hillier, located on a small island south of Western Australia.  Around the world there are many pink lakes; most of them can attribute their hue to their high salinity composition.  Some algaes that thrive in salt water produce organic pigments with a reddish/pinkish coloration.  This particular lake's coloration is a mystery.  If you any additional information, feel free to share in in the comments section below.  

   

Tags: water, physical, images, Australia.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 11:44 PM

The pink lake, Lake Hillier,  located in Western Australia is stunning. The aerial view of the lake makes the lake seem unreal that is was is fascinating. What gives the lake its pink color is a mystery, but it may be from bacteria, but it shows how some places in the world are affected differently than others and it produces remarkable results.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:48 AM

Now this is bizarre.  A pink lake and no one is really sure as to why it is pink.  It is not on the top of my list of places to go swimming, that is for sure.  Although scientists don't seem too concerned about the safety of the lake for people but are curious as to what is causing the lake to be pink.  Thoughts on algea and bacteria levels or the amount of salt are included in the potential reasoning for the pink color.  Even on google earth you can see that the lake is in fact pink.  Even when scientists come to a conclusion as to what is causing the pink colored lake, as far as it isn't causing any environmental issues, I think that the lake should be left pink as a type of wonder of the world attraction for people to see.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 2015 11:54 AM

This article caught my eye because I have never seen a pink lake before. This lake is on Middle Island in Western Australia. The lake is 600 meters wide but the reasoning behind the color of it is still yet to be determined. White salt rims the lake and the color may be caused from a low nutrient concentration and even just bacteria. The pictures of this lake are beautiful and there is not anything like it. 

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City & Country Ground Image Quiz

City & Country Ground Image Quiz | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Can you use physical and cultural geography clues to match the ground photograph with its location? Identify the 10 cities and 10 countries. In so doing, you are thinking spatially and considering language, culture, climate, landforms, land use, transportation methods, etc. to determine the correct answers."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This quiz and others like it are great ways to get students utilize all the information available in a photograph and really plumb the depths of their knowledge about places.  


Tags: games, spatial, landscape.

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The School Aranda's curator insight, January 21, 2013 6:00 AM

Should be great for FCE speaking speculation. . . .

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Putting the art in cartography

Putting the art in cartography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This dresser represents a gorgeous way to recycle vintage maps.  As with all crafts found on pinterest, it's takes more work than the 4 easy steps pictured, but this one is very managable.  I love geographically-themed art.  


Tags: art.

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Mongolia's Nomads

Mongolia's Nomads | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Through his Vanishing Cultures Project photographer Taylor Weidman documents threatened ways of life.  About his work in Mongolia, he states: "Mongolian pastoral herders make up one of the world's largest remaining nomadic cultures. For millennia they have lived on the steppes, grazing their livestock on the lush grasslands. But today, their traditional way of life is at risk on multiple fronts. Alongside a rapidly changing economic landscape, climate change and desertification are also threatening nomadic life, killing both herds and grazing land."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In times of ecological hardships and global economic restructuring, many children of nomadic herders are seeking employment out of the rural areas and in the urban environment.  The cultural change that this represents is for Mongolia enormous and is captured wonderfully in this photo gallery.  Pictured above are the ger (yurt) camps that ring the capital city Ulaanbaatar.  Ulaanbaatar houses a permanent population of displaced nomads. During the winter, Ulaanbaatar is the second most air-polluted capital in the world due largely to coal burning.


Tags: Mongolia, images, indigenous, culture, globalization.  

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 12, 2013 6:44 PM

What factors are threatening pastoral herders way of life? Why?

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 11:45 AM

Time for more pictures, my favorite part of scooping. Mongolia is almost entirely forgotten in US education, to the point where many of the people I know aren't even sure if there's a government at all. My favorite part of these pictures comes from the fusion of technology and tradition though. We see traditional housing and boys carrying water to their homes, and then a flat screen television in the makeshift house. Motorcycles are used to herd animals, and solar polar is used to power cell phones for the nomads. What I think is important here among other things is the idea that humanity has potentially reached a point where we cannot go backwards tech-wise. The dark ages in Europe saw knowledge being lost, and there are claims that humanity will wipe out its own tech in a great war, but now that we have the knowledge and ability to use solar panels and automobiles, I don't believe we'll ever lose them as a species.

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Above Australia's Northern Territory

Above Australia's Northern Territory | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over half of Australia lies above the Tropic of Capricorn, but it is home to only five percent of the population. It is a frontier land with little infrastructure, populated by cattle barons, crocodile hunters and aboriginal tribes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Australia's Northern Territory(NT) is region that is climatically inhospitable to large human settlements and is the least population region of the lightly population country.  Uluru (Ayer's Rock) is the Northern Territory's iconic landscape, and the territory is home to approximately 212,000 people according to the 2011 Australian census.  Most of the economic activity centers on resources extraction (mining); aboriginal groups control 1/5th of the NT which many hope to discourage.  This photo gallery provides a excellent glimpse into these remote places.  See also this list of the best places to visit in Australia.   


TagsAustralia.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 17, 2013 9:36 PM

Remoteness and liveability

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:19 PM

This is a huge chunks of Australia but only a little amount of people live there.

Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:21 PM

New territory in Australia!❤️❤️ 

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Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards

Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On July 18, 2013, a fierce wildfire threatened Palm Springs, California.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In a dry climate where urban expansion gets closer to dry brush, wild fires become a major summer hazard.

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, environment, land use, disasters, biogeography.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 20, 2013 3:58 PM
Alot of fire going on out west. Check out the NASA site http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/fires/main/index.html that shows them from a satellite view of the various fires.
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 21, 2013 3:48 PM

I think this shows that the weather has entered into a world of extremes of very hot or very cold, wet or dry and not to much of regular seasonal changes of the past typical patterns.

It shows that with general warmer ocean temps, has lead to this new type of weather patterns resulting from global warming. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:20 PM
When we are liviing in a hot and dry climate we are bound to face more devastating fires accident made or not
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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Even though Chris Hadfield's time on the space station is over, his twitter stream can still be a great source of images displaying the physical and human landscapes (and if you needed any more evidence that he's the coolest astronaut ever, watch his parting video singing David Bowie's Space Oddity).

  

This incredible image clearly demonstrates the fluvial processes that have creating and this and will continue to reshape this landscape.  Meander scars, oxbow lakes, channel cutoffs, floodplains and point bars are all here in this gorgeous teaching image. 


Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012. Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:52 PM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 2:45 PM

unit 6 economic development

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 2:55 PM

This is really hard to see. Children shouldn't have a hard journey getting to school to get an education and better their lives. These photos are from ten places around the world with the most dangerous journeys to school. This isn't a topic that even comes to mind because many of us living in the United States have had the luxury of being driven to school or riding a bus and we take that simple drive for granted. One of the photos is from Indonesia where students have to cross a collapsing bridge to get to school. The image shows them hanging on for dear life while trying not to fall in the water underneath them. There was a flood that broke the pillar holding this bridge up and it was never fixed after that. What happens when that bridge fully collapses? There needs to be a better way to get these kids to school. These children shouldn't have to suffer with getting their education for situations that are out of their control. 

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Urban Agriculture

Urban Agriculture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Aerial photo tour across countries and continents with a French photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand"

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love Yann Arthus-Bertrand's photography; so many of them are geography lessons in and of themselves as he captures compelling images of the cultural landscape.  This particular gallery shows 32 stunning images including this one above showing urban agriculture in Geneva, Switzerland.    


"Worldwide, there are 800 million amateur farmers in built-up areas. In estates in south eastern Asia and some towns in central and South America, many people depend on this activity for survival. It’s the same story in Europe; in Berlin there are more than 80,000 urban farmers, and in Russia more than 72% of all urban homes till their own patch of land, balcony or even roof. Urban agriculture is on the [rise] and there could be twice as many people enjoying it within twenty years."


Tags: agriculture, foodlandscape, images, urban, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 17, 2014 12:10 PM

In a time where more people are moving away from their rural roots to try and make it big in the city, I think it's becoming more and more important that we focus on how to utilize our urban surroundings in a beneficial way. These photos are proof that it is possible, and I believe that cities in the United States should be more open to urban farming. It could be a way to not only take pressure off of families in cities trying to feed their children, but will also educate all sorts of people on where food comes from, and the importance of the environment. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:16 PM

Urban agriculture is a reality in third world countries. In Dominican Republic almost everyone in the country side have its own land to plant necessary food and fruits. The most popular is plantain and fruit is orange.

In urban areas is rare to see this, so is surprising to see how central Asians are doing it.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:58 PM

I love Yann Arthus-Bertrand's photography; so many of them are geography lessons in and of themselves as he captures compelling images of the cultural landscape.  This particular gallery shows 32 stunning images including this one above showing urban agriculture in Geneva, Switzerland.    


"Worldwide, there are 800 million amateur farmers in built-up areas. In estates in south eastern Asia and some towns in central and South America, many people depend on this activity for survival. It’s the same story in Europe; in Berlin there are more than 80,000 urban farmers, and in Russia more than 72% of all urban homes till their own patch of land, balcony or even roof. Urban agriculture is on the [rise] and there could be twice as many people enjoying it within twenty years."

 

Tags: agriculture, foodlandscape, images, urban, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities. 

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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:13 PM

What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 4:57 PM

Students in China take their college entrance exam lasting 9hours. To prevent cheating they all take it at the same time with 1,200 in an exam hall. In Guangdong province, on July 9, 2007. 


Alicia Grace Lawson O'Brien's curator insight, July 16, 2014 3:07 PM

This picture is amazing to me! It is so difficult to think about how different education looks in other countries.

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How are satellite images different from photographs?

How are satellite images different from photographs? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Satellites acquire images in black and white, so how is it possible to create the beautiful color images that we see on television, in magazines, and on the internet? Computers provide us with the answer.

Images created using different bands (or wavelengths) have different contrast (light and dark areas). Computers make it possible to assign 'false color' to these black and white images. The three primary colors of light are red, green, and blue. Computer screens can display an image in three different bands at a time, by using a different primary color for each band. When we combine these three images we get a 'false color image.'

Find tutorials and links to free compositing programs here."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: remote sensing, imagesgeospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Ken Halpern's comment, March 1, 2013 1:23 PM
Very interesting to see how the process works. This is very helpful when trying to get a point across.
Conor McCloskey's comment, March 4, 2013 8:59 PM
The Electromagnetic scale always confused me in High School! Hahaha. I also didn't know that satellites only take pictures in black and white.
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DIY satellite images

Cornerstone Christian school 7th grade science project. The effects of Altitude on air pressure and temperature. Cameras: GoPro Hero2 video footage. Edited B...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is the coolest Junior High geospatial technologies project ever.  This actually recorded some nice remotely sensed images.  You can actually do something similar yourself with this balloon kit.  You can read about some successful attempts to do this with geography students and colleagues from @AndrewShears which can be seen here and another by @bricker that is worth looking at here.    


Tags: remote sensing, imagesgeospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Photographing Iconic Landmarks

Photographing Iconic Landmarks | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Oh, Machu Picchu, ancient city of the Incas, pride of Peru, must-see travel destination: You've never been so appropriately photobombed by a llama.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Millions of tourists have already taken a picture of Machu Picchu from this angle, and yet, tourists all want to replicate the iconic shot as for themselves--proof that they were there and had the full experience.  Iconic images are perfect for internet memes (and in this instance a photobomb) because there is a shared cultural understanding of what the picture should look like normally and inverting that provides the comic relief.  CAPTION THIS PHOTO IN THE COMMENTS SECTION. 


Tags: Peru, South America, tourism, images.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:59 PM

While humorous these pictures really show that certain areas and regions are often imagined by a set and specific image. When Machu Picchu is thought of it is always seen from the same peak, making this an incredibly popular photo spot for tourists, or in this case a llama.  

Michael Eiseman's curator insight, December 18, 2014 7:19 PM

#LlamaHam we at www.viptourgroup.com have about 20 pictures of Llamas that are pretty photogenic. I have one that was stuck in a split tree on purpose in Salta Argentina.  Seems they have personality! and want to get a few bucks now for a photo. #paytoplay hipsters.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:21 PM

This is hilarious. It's a perfect moment to capture a picture, while also distracting from how actually beautiful Machu Picchu really is. But, if anything this will probably make people want to visit even more, because they'll all want to take this picture themselves. Which, will undoubtedly be good for Peru's economy. Who says photobombs can't be a good thing?

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Inverted Earth

Seth Dixon's insight:

These maps were purposefully designed to break all the cartographic conventions and consequently conceal as much as they reveal.  When land is colored blue, what happens in the mind of the map viewer?  Why is psychology important in how we design maps?     


Tags: images, mapping, cartography.

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Dewayne Lawson's comment, January 19, 2013 9:19 PM
very cool!
Suggested by Nic Hardisty
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Interactive Earth at Night

Interactive Earth at Night | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

You've seen the this image as a static map, as a video and as an adjusted cartogram here before.  This link is especially intriguing because this same data has been added to Google Maps so a user can interactively explore this layer and compare it to daytime satellite imagery or a standard map (it can also be seen on an interactive globe on http://www.geteach.com/ ). 


The first impulse of most students is to note when analyzing this image is to note that the map will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map.


Tags: remote sensing, images, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Giovanni Della Peruta's curator insight, January 14, 2013 11:54 AM

Thanks to Nic Hardisty

Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, January 14, 2013 12:02 PM
Very good comment, Seth
سعيد محمد's comment, January 15, 2013 11:03 AM
ok
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2012 National Geographic Photography Contest Winners

2012 National Geographic Photography Contest Winners | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The winners have been named in the 2012 National Geographic Photography contest. As a leader in capturing the world through brilliant imagery, National Geographic sets the standard for photographic excellence.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This image of the Matterhorn was the 1st place winner in the "places" category in the National Geographic's 2012 competition.  The winners are just as impressive as you would expect coming from National Geographic.

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The School Aranda's curator insight, January 9, 2013 4:50 AM

This image of the Matterhorn was the 1st place winner in the "places" category in the National Geographic's 2012 competition.  The winners are just as impressive as you would expect coming from National Geographic.


Wow....these should prove very useful for K, T and A classes.

Michal Zachar's curator insight, January 9, 2013 8:57 AM

This image of the Matterhorn was the 1st place winner in the "places" category in the National Geographic's 2012 competition.  The winners are just as impressive as you would expect coming from National Geographic.

Webdesigners's curator insight, January 10, 2013 6:51 AM

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