Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Skills for the Digital Earth

Skills for the Digital Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Elmhurst College’s Skills for the Digital Earth MOOC is a 4-week, online course designed to introduce how location technologies are used in society.
Ever stop to think about how important location is when using your smart phone? This educational MOOC begins with an elementary explanation of how society uses location in a myriad of disciplines. Geography, or rather, "where?" is important to all of us from various perspectives.
Within this MOOC, participants will learn what location technologies are used for, how the discipline developed and learn by doing via a series of scaffolded practical exercises. Online spatial software will be employed for any device using a browser which takes users through exercises and real world examples. It is appropriate for those with no prior experience with geographic information systems (GIS) software all the way to advanced users.
Skills for the Digital Earth will incorporate video lectures, interaction opportunities and discussion forums. Each module will feature a quiz and activities, and participants will receive a badge after each completed module to be used to demonstrate skills mastered.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I am very excited about this free MOOC offered through the Elmhurst College Online Center (they also offer the Graduate Certificate Program for AP Human Geography teachers).  The instructor, Dr. Rich Schultz is the Associate Director of the National Geospatial Technologies Center of Excellence.

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"Lost" New England Revealed

"Lost" New England Revealed | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"New England's woody hills and dales hide a secret—they weren't always forested. Instead, many were once covered with colonial roads and farmsteads."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love living in New England and finding stone walls from old farmsteads; an archaeology professor at UConn is using geospatial technologies to map out the remants of that historical landscape.  This is a great example of using spatial thinking across the disciplines. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatiallandscape, historical, environment modify.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 8, 2014 10:55 AM

Through the most recent technology, man has been able to discover that wooded areas of New England where once vibrant communities, homesteads and settled communities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 26, 2014 10:44 PM

Thanks to dedicated archeologists and the LiDAR, we can see the creations of a once small, abandoned community in New England. Even through the thick forest, the LiDAR can detect rocks walls and small dirt roads. Hopefully, we can find more of these ancient communities in other areas around the world.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:48 PM

History is revealed with the use of high tech scanners known as  LiDAR's. With the use of these scanners, scholars learn that many areas of New England, including forested areas in Connecticut and Rhode Island, once were farming grounds. These "lost" pieces of history now lead scholars in new directions in dicovering the past, and details to its future.

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Gaming to Help Farmers

Gaming to Help Farmers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A computer game wants you to map the world's cropland so farmers can get more out of each harvest.
Seth Dixon's insight:

NPR has recently highlighted Crop Capture; Crop Capture is a game that uses Google Earth imagery to crowd-source agricultural data.  From a pedagogical standpoint, this is a great way to visually introduce students the variety of agricultural landscapes that can be found around the world.  This is an example of what many refer to as citizen science games which provides an alternative rationale for playing the game.


Tags: agriculture, food production, mapping, geospatial, edtech.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, December 4, 2013 7:30 PM

These types of approaches to crowd sourcing are becoming bigger and bigger by the day it seems.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:34 PM

This is cool, there are many agricultural types and you can see It here. different land areas have different soil and chemicals in it which certain types of crops can benefit from. It is important to know these things. 

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Precipitation Mapping

Precipitation Mapping | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

In New Hampshire they are doing great work to make mapping data useful in the classroom.  This site is one that they use to show how students can map locally relevant data from an online data set.  CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow Network)  is a crowd-sourced network that gathers North American precipitation data.  The data (especially the total precipitation summary) can be easily copied into as spread sheet and saved as a CSV file (which can be uploaded to ArcGIS online).


Tagsmapping, CSV, water, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 30, 2014 9:42 PM

This is  COCORAHS. people from different places put this measurement tools to measure the rain fall, and it is different everywhere. this is cool in my opinion.

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Spatial Navigation Before GPS

Spatial Navigation Before GPS | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Giant 70-foot concrete arrows that point your way across the country, left behind by a forgotten age of US mail delivery.  Long before the days of radio (and those convenient little smartphone applications), the US Postal service began a cross-country air mail service using army war surplus planes from World War I.  The federal government funded enormous concrete arrows to be built every 10 miles or so along established airmail routes they were each built alongside a 50 foot tall tower with a rotating gas-powered light. These airway beacons are said to have been visible from a distance of 10 miles high."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is fascinating...just because a technology is old and outdated in modern society doesn't mean it wasn't ingenious.  The original mathmeticans who calcuated angles and distances study geometry so they could navigate and 'measure the Earth.' These giant arrows are but one of those links in the geneological strands of navigational technology.   Mathematics can be incredibly spatial as well as geospatial.   

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, December 15, 2013 1:49 PM

Adesso sembra incredibile che si usasse un sistema simile per guidare la posta aerea. Forse a quei tempi sembrava normale. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:14 AM

I love articles like this one where they talk about the collide of different times. This article speaks of huge concrete arrows which were left from 1930's air mail routes. sadly most of the towers that were paired with the arrows have been dismantled but still really cool that these directional arrows from the past can still be found almost 90 years later.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:44 PM

Wow technology has come a long way in just a short amount of time! We would still be using  those stone arrows if it wasn't for the invention of the GPS. 

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Create Your Own Map

Create Your Own Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Create a color-coded Visited States Map, showing off your road travel in the United States and Canada."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The map above represents where I have been (green) and where I have lived (orange).  Super easy, anyone can use this site to create a PNG file that maps out North America (maximum of 5 colors, including white).  For more on how to create your own, read here.  Canada, Alaska and Hawaii can be included as well.    

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Charles Adami's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:52 PM

Students color code states involved in expedition. Louisiana Purchase , and US circa 1803.

Cam E's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:40 PM

I took the liberty of using this site which was linked on my Professor's page to create my own map of travels within the United States! Green represents states which I've spent many nights, amber for states which I briefly passed through, and red for states I've never been to at all. I didn't include the map for Canada as well, but I've been to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Ontario primarily. I'm very into the idea of travel and intend to visit as many places as I can in my lifetime, but I have focused much of my journeys for the future into foreign countries. This map gave me the hint that I might want to focus homeward a bit more.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:40 PM

http://vsm.defocus.net/img/vsm-28fc2e56c17b6506f2405817cce289c4.png This link is a picture of my map. It was divided by different colors. Red was for places you have not seen. Amber was for places you have seen some and maybe slept there a couple times. Blue meant that you have been there a fair amount of times and green meant that you spent the most time their and slept there on multiple occasions. Unfortunately, almost my whole map was the color red. I haven't been many places. The only places that I have consistently been to are Florida, New York, and Massachusetts. Connecticut on rare occasions and of course Rhode Island was the number one place on my map. I hope to one day turn all those red states into green states.

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Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The uses of geospatial technologies are NOT limited to studying geography, but it is the bedrock of many research projects that involve spatial thinking (as demonstrated in this TED talk).  Geographic principles and geographers can be very important components of interdisciplinary research teams.


Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, Egypt, historical

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 2014 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:49 AM

Space archaeology only makes sense.  If we have the capability for satellites to take pictures of earth from above why shouldn't it be used for archaeological analysis?  I am sure that this is only the tip of the iceberg as far as what we will see in the future from this specific field. This article/video just lends more credibility to the fact that Archaeology should function as an interdisciplinary field.

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The Longitude Problem

The Longitude Problem | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Today we take it for granted that through GPS technology we can instantaneously determine our latitude and longitude.  This video documents how for centuries it was fairly easy to determine latitude at sea by measuring the height of the sun in the sky, but longitude (determined by the difference in time between local noon and the noon of a fixed point) could only be estimated.  The British Empire saw solving the "longitude problem" as the key to solidifying their economic dominance at sea and they established the Board of Longitude in this 18th century "race to the moon." Today the University of Cambridge has digitized the Board of Longitude's archives with a series of five shorter video clips.  


Tagsmapping, GPS, historical, cartography, geospatial, location.

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Romain ARMAND's comment, August 21, 2013 5:17 AM
Thank you for the video and fo the link to the Board of Longitude! Already know this story, but still amazing and well documented.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:30 PM

Great video on how the problem of longitude was solved.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:57 AM

What was mapping and navigation like before the era of GPS?

Check out this great archive and collection of video clips! 

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Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."
Seth Dixon's insight:

The recently revised Geography for Life standards have been aligned to show how geographic skills can be taught within the Common Core framework.  The National Geographic Society, in cooperation with the National Council for Geographic Education and the Network of Alliances for Geographic Education created Connections to be that link (for grade specific Common Core/Geography resources click here). 


So how is this to be done? This storymap shows ten great examples of maps that can be used as reading documents, one for each of the 10 ELA Reading Standards. 


TagsmappingEnglish, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:40 PM

Common core ideas

 

Duke No Limit's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:53 PM

wow very interesting

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

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Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As displayed in this fabulous video, NOAA has produced in-depth information about the Earth's dynamic vegetation layers.  This is a great example of how remote sensing data can enhance our understanding of the planet; additionally it is packaged in a very user-friendly format for a wide ranges of audiences.  For great static images of this data layer, National Geographic has produced this great gallery


Tags: physical, remote sensing, geospatial, biogeography.

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.
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Words Matter: How Geospatial Education Suffers Because of Government Classification

Words Matter: How Geospatial Education Suffers Because of Government Classification | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Recent news stories discussed why geography is important to an informed and engaged society.  To those of us in the geospatial profession, basic geography education is an essential foundation to encouraging young people to enter the workforce in surveying, photogrammetry, GIS and other disciplines in our field."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While many in the geography education business bemoan student's lack of global awareness as a rationale for geography education, this is the key angle that I feel we should be pushing: the workforce.  We currently are not producing enough students with geospatial skills in the United States to fill the jobs (one of the problems with geography being classified as a social science).  Now that is a practical reason to support geography that non-geographers can understand.


Tags: labor, geospatial, edtech, geography education,

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 8:00 PM

In a world of information the knowledge of geography is lacking.

Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 2014 10:43 PM

Defining "geospatial" is still a convoluted mess.

Nick Smith's curator insight, September 9, 2014 12:31 PM

The government is hurting geography education

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Esri Thematic Atlas

Esri Thematic Atlas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Esri Thematic Atlas is a configurable web application that uses a collection of intelligent web maps with text, graphics, and images to talk about our world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

ESRI is moving towards creating a dynamic, authorative, living digital atlas and empowering users to create their own.  See this great political map of 2008 U.S. presidential election that is a part of the altas; it goes far beyond simple blue and red states.  StoryMaps are also democratizing the mapping process.  Explore these excellent examples of storymaps (Endangered Languages and top 10 physical landforms). 


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech.

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JMSS_Geography Resources's curator insight, June 26, 2013 1:20 AM

The Esri Thematic Atlas is a configurable web application that uses a collection of intelligent web maps with text, graphics, and images to talk about our world.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:53 AM

First unit is based on maps and atlases.  Want to build a range of resources.

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Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice?

Land Unseen: What's Beneath Antarctica's Ice? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Many of us tend to think of Antarctica as a sheet of solid snow and ice. But, in contrast with its peer to the north, the southern pole's ice sheet lies atop a rocky continent. What are its features, its mountains and valleys, plains and coastlines?

A new dataset from the British Antarctic Survey provides the most detailed map ever of the bedrock below, information scientists hope will enable them to better model the affects of climate change on the ice, whose melting will have an impact on climate the world over."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video sheds some light on explorations to uncover truths about one of the most remote places on Earth.


Tags: Antarctica, water, physical, remote sensing, geospatial.


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Johani Karonen's curator insight, June 17, 2013 4:46 AM

Talking about challanges - Amundsen and Scott sure had a tough one!

Jason, Charlie's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:33 PM

This is the Intellctual part of Antarctica. This video talks about what is underneathAntarctica. Its' ice is flowing out towardsstone sea and could contribute to sea rise. If Antarctica didn't have anymoreonce our ocean would have a major rise but Antarctica would be a new place. 

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Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings

Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The high-tech project would help officials decide which abandoned buildings can be demolished.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This crowd-sourced mapping project is an great example of how a community can work together (using geospatial technologies and geographic thinking) to mitigate some of the more pressing issues confronting the local neighborhoods.  Many optimists have argued that Detroit has "good bones" to rebuild the city, but it needs to built on as smaller scale.  This project helps to assess what is being used by residents and should stay, and what needs to go.  Want to explore some of the data yourself?  See Data Driven Detroit.      

 

Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhoodmapping, GIS, geospatial.


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, September 17, 2014 1:18 PM

So many of the buildings in Detroit have fallen out of use, and are being inhabited by squatters, drug users and vermin. The kindest thing to do is to demolish the ragtag structures in hopes of a chance to revitalize the fallen city. It was one of the first major cities in the US to be primarily built for the automobile. Although the city has fallen out of favor as industry has relocated, it was a well planned metropolis, and has a repairable infrastructure. The sewer lines, electric grid and paved streets lend to the idea of regrowing the city. By using input of the citizens, the government and city planners are able to identify what is useful and what needs to be demolished.

 

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The Future of Remote Sensing?

"We are pleased to introduce the world's first high-resolution HD video of Earth taken from a commercial remote sensing satellite.

This video showcases a selection of the first videos taken from SkySat-1, the first of our planned 24 satellite constellation. The video clips have not yet been calibrated or tuned. SkySat-1 captures up to 90-second video clips at 30 frames per second. The resolution is high enough to resolve objects that impact the global economy like shipping containers, while maintaining a level of clarity that does not determine human activity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Most remote sensing videos show still images that are animated to give the temporal sequence a video-like quality.  Technology is changing rapidly and this video represents an impressive leap in our ability to monitor changes on Earth's surface.  To read more about SkyBox Imaging and their plans, click here.   


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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mengotti severino's curator insight, January 2, 2014 9:50 AM

Osserva divertito i surfisti e immagina di essere tu, travolto dall'onda delle FATTURE TELECOM.  Salvati, passa a DIGITEL di Mengotti. 3291481498 .

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 2015 6:06 PM

This video, created in December of 2013, illustrates the first HD video recorded from a remote sensing satellite. A milestone such as this one opens tons of doors for future progress on remote sensing. 

Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:00 PM

Over the past years, remote sensing has established major innovations such as capturing the world's first high-resolution HD video of Earth taken from a satellite. Within the link, a video is shown to show the viewer the exact HD video taken and portrays detailed depictions of the world's surface along with labels pertaining to these specific locations. What this means for the future of remote sensing is that geographers can now access high resolution videos of any part of the world from remote sensing technologies located in space. These innovations show the bright future of geographical technologies and opens the door to many possibilities people can take to further improving remote sensing. 

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Geospatial Technologies Transforming Lives - Geoporter

Geospatial Technologies Transforming Lives - Geoporter | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Educating residents, teachers and youth in a costal community in Costa Rica to use geospatial technologies to investigate, map and make a difference.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you are looking to find a practical example of how geospatial technologies can empower neighborhoods and students, take a look at the GEOPORTER project.  If you can assist, I can tell you that I know the people working on this project and am impressed by their work. 

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 3, 2013 1:57 AM

Environmental management -.coastal and marine environments.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 19, 2014 1:30 PM

In Costa Rica

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Happy GIS Day

Seth Dixon's insight:

Happy GIS day!  Discover some great GIS resources that you can use in the classroom to help students gain spatial thinking skills and expand their global awareness.  Don't think there is a career for you in geography?  Think again.  


Tagsmapping, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, November 21, 2013 3:46 AM

Interesting, educational and new learning for some.

Pájaro Chogüí's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:42 PM

torne47@yahoo.es

 

Mr Inniss's curator insight, July 21, 2014 7:03 PM

Well, you may have missed 2013, but the next one is going on in Birmingham on the 20th of November: http://www.gisday.com/gis-day-events-map.html

 

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Guide to Earth Explorer for Landsat 8

Guide to Earth Explorer for Landsat 8 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Landsat Data Continuity Mission is now Landsat 8, and that means images are now public (woohoo!). NASA handed control of the satellite to the USGS earlier this year (May 30, 2013), and calibrated imagery is available through the Earth Explorer. Unfortunately, the Earth Explorer interface is a bit of a pain, so I’ve put together a guide to make it easier.

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you have been afraid to download remotely sensed images, this is a very-user friendly, step-by-step guide on how to download Landsat 8 data (and many other geospatial datasets)  using Earth Explorer from USGS.  


Tagsremote sensing, geospatial.

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Sharrock's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:36 PM

Looks like a cool tool for mapping activities.

Chris Cividino's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:09 AM

The Landsat program is an essential tool for geographers when they are studying GIS. Without this data, Google Earth and many of the other mapping programs we love so much would not be possible.

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Can We Save Venice?

Can We Save Venice? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Venice is sinking--no news there.  Some of the sinking is natural based on the geomorphological processes on being in a lagoon and some is based on how people have modified the physical landscape.  The GREEN on the map represents restoration efforts to stabilize the city while the RED indicates that human-caused activities have produced sinking.  Additionally in this new study, researchers have used remote sensing data to differentiate between the anthropogenic sinking (human-caused sinking) and the natural sinking in Venice.  This city is a perfect example of the three major types of human and environmental interactions [we 1) depend on the environment, 2) adapt to the environment and 3) modify the environment] and shows the issues associated with these interactions.  Click here for a hi-res image of Venice and to see why I love the city. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, physical, environment, geomorphology, erosion, environment modify.

 

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:42 PM

This detailed account of the problems faced by the people, and city, of Venice is a great account of the idea of Human Environment Interaction that is central to Human Geography. Human actions are causing the city to sink while more human actions are attempting to raise the city out of the water.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:24 PM

It is no surprise to anyone that one day the beautiful city of Venice will one day be completely submerged under water. However looking at this map makes it hopeful that the process may be slowed down or even stopped! Looking at the map the green boxes represent the parts of Venice that have been uplifted, while the red boxes represent the parts that are sinking. What was surprising was that there appeared to be more green boxes on the map than red. Most of the boxes, both green and red, are along the coastline. I would think since most of the damage is along the coast line it would be a little easier to try and uplift. Hopefully the green boxes can make up for the red boxes in order to keep Venice from continually sinking. With these advances who knows where we will be in even another twenty years. We may be able to continue to uplift Venice to prevent it from submerging under water. It appears that the city is making progress in this process from the data given in the map. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:53 AM

As we all know Venice is known for its lack of streets because the city is navigated by canals. This map shows where humans are actually causing the city to sink (in red) and where through restoration and consideration are helping the city stay afloat (Green). These little acts of restoration can become increasinly important in the future with growing population density. Lets hope that Venice doesnt get to populated though so the next generation dosent have to refer to it as the lost underwater city of venice.

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GPS Astray: Lost in Death Valley

GPS Astray: Lost in Death Valley | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Three women’s Death Valley day trip soured after their GPS led them to the edge of survival."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a extreme example, but this video serves as a cautionary tale.  The harsh and unforgiving physical geography of Death Valley does not tolerate a lack of preparation.  Here is part 2 of the video.  Garmin the GPS manufacturer's statement on these videos is quite telling "GPS's shouldn't be followed blindly...it is incumbent on users to obtain and update their GPS devices with the most recent map updates." 


Technology is designed to guide and assist our decision-making process--that does NOT mean we should turn over thinking functions to the device.  Spatial thinking is just like a muscle that will atrophy if it is never used.  So consult a map and think for yourself; newer technologies aren't always better or more reliable.   


Tagsmapping, GPS, geospatial, location, California.

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Mike Carney's curator insight, September 30, 2013 4:48 PM

GPS devices are very useful tools, but if you don't know how to use them properly they can be very frustrating and sometimes can get you into trouble. On the surface a GPS seems like a pretty fool-proof navigation device, but that's giving people way too much credit. A lot of (older) people can have a hard time following them. Take my mother-in-law for example, she once got lost for a half hour on the ten minute drive from my house to the highway. Somehow she missed the ONE turn and apparently didn't understand how to make a U-turn. People generally go astray if they fail to update their GPS, don't know how to configure their settings properly, or follow the GPS blindly. People often forget that they can just use the GPS as a map and figure out their own routes when the GPS is being wonky. Its also a good idea to keep real maps in your car so you don't have to rely soly on the GPS. The women from the video were dealing with a GPS that was following inaccurate and outdated information. At a time like this its a good idea to pull over and get out the map rather than drive in circles until you run out of gas.

 

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:43 PM

       Is not always the best idea to only rely on you GPS when traveling, best thing to do is to get and updated maps.  Is always good to get information on where you are going, how long are you going to be there? So you can get enough supplies like food, water, clothes etc.  Also are you making other stops along the road? Let someone know where you going therefore; if something happened to you they know where to look for you, once again don’t always trust on electronic. Prepared AHEAD!!

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:21 PM

Although I have grown up around technology, I've always been a little skeptical about its reliability. It is a good thing to have a GPS, but we should not rely solely upon it. Relying solely upon technolgy is not as good as it sounds. In some cases the GPS could be wrong and in instances such as these we need to be able to think for ourselves. Not having this ability is a dangerous situation. 

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This Pulsing Earth

This Pulsing Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm sorry that this site cannot display the animated GIF version, but just follow the link to see how the seasonal rthymns of the climate and biomass pulsate (at a much slower rate than our bodies, but still a system with it's ebbs and flows).  


Tags: physical, remote sensing, geospatial, biogeography, weather and climate, Arctic.

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T3G Lightning Talks

T3G Lightning Talks | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Earlier this summer the T3G participants had an informal lightning talk session with many people sharing their favorite educational, geospatial or professional development tools.  I was amazed as some of the incredible projects these fantastic educator are involved with and I didn’t have time to properly credit all the speakers, but this was the best I could do to capture some incredible projects.  Below are some of the links:

Seth Dixon's insight:

GIS and GEOSPATIAL in EDUCATION


EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 3, 2013 11:12 PM

good refereces and resources.

techsavvygirl's curator insight, August 4, 2013 9:00 AM

inspiration for those who enjoy geospatial learning tools

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 8, 2013 7:15 AM

Recursos y referencias para la educación geoespacial

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Urban Observatory

Urban Observatory | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Urban Observatory city comparison app enables you to explore the living fabric of great cities by browsing a variety of cities and themes.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Yesterday at the ESRI User Conference, the Urban Observatory (CLICK THE PREVIOUS LINK) was unveiled.  The physical display contained images from cities around the world to compare and contrast diverse urban environments.  The online version of this was announced during in a 10 minute talk by Jack Dangermond and Hugh Keegan.  This interactive mapping platform let's users access 'big data' and have it rendered in thematic maps.  These maps cover population patterns, transportation networks, and weather systems.  This is a must see.  Read Forbes' article on the release of Urban Observatory here.

 

Tags: transportation, urban, GIS, geospatial, ESRI.

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Utiya Chusna Sitapraptiwi's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:44 AM

Easy to find a picture of the city in the world. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:45 PM

I have been using Google Earth to check out a few different areas that I have and have not been to, particularly Washington D.C./Maryland, which I visited last month for the first time.  I thought it was truly awesome and loved all the subtle differences as well as the larger and more obvious differences from RI.  This Observatory is pretty interesting, and doesn't limit your observations to strictly visual perceptions, unlike most Astrological Observatories.  It is a compendium of knowledge, information, and facts that define and characterize, categorize and redefine areas of the world.  This seems like something out of Minority Report or Deja Vu (two really good sci-fi movies with visual observation technology that looks through time), both because of its appearance, and because of its general function.  It also reminds me of some stuff that I've seen in the 1967 "The Prisoner" series, which really blew my mind about sociological portayals of the occasionally subversive human condition from entirely oppressing parties and circumstances.  Hopefully this information will, as comes with great power, be treated with great responsibility... For all our sakes.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:05 PM

Nice. I'm going to try it.

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Map

Seth Dixon's insight:

The best technologies aren't only the newest and the most expensive.  We are often attracted to the latest and greatest and devalue the tried and true practices out there.  Learning map reading skills is more important than ever. 

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Luis Aguilar Cruz's curator insight, July 2, 2013 2:50 AM

Bienvenue à l'expérience map

ethne staniland's curator insight, July 3, 2013 4:57 PM

very good

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:29 PM

While technology does has its pros it also comes with its cons. GPS batteries can die; the map on the screen may be unreadable due to size, the GPS itself could break if not handled properly. When it comes to maps, it is durable and legible in any position. However, I can not read a map while driving my car to a certain place. It is rather difficult to find a place when i'm in unfamiliar territory. In this case the GPS is able to direct me to where i need to be. If handled properly, the GPS is, at least in my opinion, better than the map. However, it is nice to keep and extra map in the glove compartment, just in case. 

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Great Web Maps

Seth Dixon's insight:

Today was the first of the T3G Institute at the Esri headquarters and the wonderful team has shared great resources that I found incredibly useful for teachers to use great web maps.  So what makes a great web map. A great web map should be highly interactive, intuitive, and be able to function at various scales.  This video helps to show the power of maps to help tell a great story or to share spatial content. 


The presenters each shared an exemplary web map.


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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