Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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20 Classrooms From Around The World

20 Classrooms From Around The World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

We are all different...we are all the same.   This is a set set of images that highlights the essential similarities in people across cultures.

 

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Nick Lesley's comment, May 27, 2014 3:42 PM
i thought this was very cool and interesting to see different classes all around the world and how their culture is i would really like to see a video on the classes to see how they learn...cool article and good pictures
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Experiencing World Regional Geography

Experiencing World Regional Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two hundred countries and 20 times around the planet - a man's amazing journey in his Mercedes.

 

This 5 minute video is a glimpse into the life and travels of Gunther Holtorf, on a 23-year, 500,000 mile journey.  This man has experienced, lived and seen so many of the places, cultures and environments that we try to make come to life for our students as we study the wonderful world we live in.   

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Kid World Citizen

Kid World Citizen | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Activities that help young minds go global."

 

This website is especially good for elementary school teachers that are looking for ways to globalize their students educational experiences.  They have activities and resources that are regionally organized--check it out! 

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 22, 2012 9:17 AM
I had always heard the view of children learning more at younger ages. An excellent idea to broaden the children's cultural views and backgrounds.
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Fascinating Places

Fascinating Places | Geography Education | Scoop.it

'Fascinating Places' is a Facebook page that uploads a beautiful picture from somewhere around the world everyday.  It's great!  This particular image is from Naunton, U.K. in the fabled Cotswolds which are fantastically quaint, dripping with 18th century pastoral charm.   

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Belief in God dips, but not everywhere

Belief in God dips, but not everywhere | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Belief in God is on the wane, except that as we age, we tend to believe more. Or perhaps not.

 

The geography of religion, religiosity and atheism are all analyzed in this fasinating news article.

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8 of the Most Unique Paths in the World

8 of the Most Unique Paths in the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This gorgeous gallery shows some of the most beautiful and distinct walkways around the world.  Take some time to just walk, and appreciate the world we live in.  Pictured above is the "stunning flower walkway [that] is the known as the Wisteria Tunnel, situated in the Kawachi Fuji Garden (City of Kitakyushu). It is an 80-meter (260 ft) long tunnel of white Fuji flowers, while a tunnel of yellow Kingusari needs a few more years to become an actual tunnel."

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100 Cities and Their Nicknames

100 Cities and Their Nicknames | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I like nicknames, they define us better than our names, they are clever and funny and they tell so much about our personality and sometimes, about our aspect, although this might be the worst case.

This is a good list...what does a nickname tell us about the city?

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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 9, 2015 2:16 PM

What's your favorite?

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World Atlas with Geography Facts, Maps, Flags

World Atlas with Geography Facts, Maps, Flags | Geography Education | Scoop.it
World Atlas is an educational resource for world maps, atlases, and in-depth geography information. Teachers and students: free maps of Europe, USA, Canada, Florida, Caribbean Islands and much more.

 

This World Atlas, in addition to have many maps at a variety of scales as is very common these days, has the added feature of embedding facts and other informative features based on your scale and regional context.  Students can explore this at their own pace to learn about what every region of the world that interests them the most.

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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 

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Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 2014 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability

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Nations of the World

This is old enough that have been some changes to the political maps since this was produced 1993.  What listed countries would now be marked incorrect?  Which ones, even then would be politically contentious to categorize as a country? 

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33aketzalli's comment, February 21, 2012 12:45 AM
Muy bueno!!
Malice in Wonderland's comment, February 21, 2012 7:10 PM
If this was made in 1993 then the people who made it had no real grasp of political-geography. For example the Soviet Union had been gone for 2 years by then, yet it is still shown on the map. To top it off the voice over refers to it as "Russia". How's that for pointing out at least 16 errors at once? (Yeah I mean 16, not 15. Not a mistake. Think about it)
Seth Dixon's comment, February 21, 2012 7:50 PM
The 15 former Socialist Republics were labeled as Russia under one map, but was it still the Commonwealth of Independent States in 1993? That could be your elusive 16th. Czechoslovakia, Sudan and Yugoslavia have all fragmented while Zaire and Kampuchea need a name upgrade to the Congo and Cambodia. Palestine and Taiwan are two that are still as nebulous as ever, very difficult to define.
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2012 World Press Photo Contest Winners

2012 World Press Photo Contest Winners | Geography Education | Scoop.it
By the numbers: 5, 247 Photographers, 124 Nationalities, 101, 254 pictures. Three hundred and fifty images by 57 photographers of 24 nationalities were awarded prizes in nine categories.

 

I find the Boston Globe's "The Big Picture" to consistently be a great source for geography images and this one fits the bill.  In the picture above is the 1st Prize for Contemporary Issues Stories: "Tahani, who married her husband Majed when she was 6 years old and he was 25 years old, poses for a portrait with her former classmate Ghada, also a child bride outside their mountain home in Hajjah, Yemen, June 10, 2010. Nearly half of all women in Yemen were married as children." 

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"The Most Amazing High Definition Image of Earth Ever," Says NASA

"The Most Amazing High Definition Image of Earth Ever," Says NASA | Geography Education | Scoop.it
NASA has released a new Blue Marble image, showing the United States of America. According to them, it's the "most amazing, highest resolution image of Earth ever." Blue Marble 2012 bests the 2010 edition and the original one.

 

Beautiful image...follow the link for a video of the image at a variety of scales as well as the specs and production that went into it.   There is an 8000 x 8000 pixel version as well as many lower resolution versions. 

 

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Time Lapse: Around the World

17 Countries. 343 Days. 6237 Photographs. One incredible journey. Follow the adventure at http://kienlam.net/around-the-world and http://kienlam.net Like Me ...

 

A great 'start of the year/semester' video to show some of the many wonders this world has to offer. 

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 2014 10:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

Riley Tuggle's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:51 AM

I believe India has more men than women because sometimes when women can't have a son for their first or second child, the men would beat the women to death, or in some instances women are captured and sold for wives, and they may commit suicide they are so depressed. Also, some pregnant women find out their baby is a girl, they would aport or abandon her because sons are apparently more important and successful because they would stay home and take care of their parents when they are elderly and they would carry on the families name. -rt

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:22 AM

This is fantastic - have a look at various countries and their 'rate' of growth

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Amazing animated infographic look at various world stats

Amazing animated infographic look at various world stats | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Amazing animated infographic look at various world statistics in Oceania vs. Europe vs. America vs. Africa vs. Asia, from population to homicides to number of billionaires – a fine example of how to...

 

The video doesn't have captions to denote which continent is which, otherwise this is an excellent data visualization of global and regional differences, using the theme of the Olympics as it's symbolic motif. 

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Abby Budorick's comment, September 2, 2012 12:14 PM
This is such a cool idea. I love how they used olympic rings to represent the different continents. I just wished they would've put which rings represented which continents during the whole video because it was kind of confusing. Also, I don't think they should've combined the Americas because I think they are so different and the stats would probably be very different.
Bradford Baumstark's comment, September 2, 2012 5:44 PM
The idea hat they had for this video was very interesting but it was also very confusing because they didn't tell us which color was which continent. The concted words at the beginig confused me a bit too because I'm not sure where Oceania even is.
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8 Stunning One-Color Towns

8 Stunning One-Color Towns | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"We've all heard about the colorful towns around the world, there are really lots of them and their facades are very colorful and striking. But, are there any towns that are painted in only one color? Of course there are, but they are very rare. Exactly, the following list deals with these unusual tourist destinations - a one-color towns, enjoy the article."  Pictured is Izamal, Mexico on the Yucatan peninsula.     

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Brandon Murphy's comment, July 12, 2012 6:05 AM
What is the significance of having every building in a town the same color? Did it start as a lack of multiple resources/ an abundance of another? Or is it all part of the design?
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 12, 2012 5:22 PM
Very beautiful in it's own respect, but it lacks the option of choice, and originality. It leads to a sort of cultural identity however making every place completely uniform.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 22, 2012 8:35 PM
I wonder if tourism, rather than any strong sense of communal identity is the major force behind the continued dominance of the color yellow in Izamal?
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The United Nations at a Glance

The United Nations at a Glance | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This is the site for the United Nations at a Glance. Here you will find information and links on history, members, visitis, employement and other details.

 

While some critize the ineffectiveness of the organization, the United Nations remains a key organization to get understanding modern geopolitics.  Through their UN voting patterns, we can assess the geopolitical motivations, interests and alliances of member states.  Also, initiatives (whether successful or not) and highlight the important issues of the day that globally aware students should understand.  

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Images of Earth From Above

Images of Earth From Above | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Yesterday was Earth Day, a time set aside to increase awareness of the natural environment and the impact of our collective actions...

 

This is a gorgeous set of 39 images that are all view the Earth and captures images for above.  These aerial photography and remote sensing images focus of a wide range of topics such as the cultural landscape, the environment, earth science, cultural ecology and urban systems.   The photo above is of Mont-Saint-Michel, a tourist attraction and UNESCO world heritage site in northwestern France that is the world's premier example of the tombolo landform.


Via M. Roman
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Paige T's comment, August 28, 2012 2:55 PM
Its interesting how patterns in this world repeat themselves, whether in nature or man-made objects. The pictures of the shanty town in Venezuela and the floating ice sheets in Germany are similar in their layers, overlapping, and repetitiveness.
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Global Index of Peace

Global Index of Peace | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A ground-breaking milestone in the study of peace. For the first time, an Index has been created that ranks the nations of the world by their peacefulness and identifies some of the drivers of that peace.

 

The last post showed that national rankings of the states that were the most (and least) peaceful.  This is the international version.  1) Iceland 2) New Zealand and 3) Japan lead the list while 151) Sudan 152) Iraq and 153) Somalia are at the bottom.   Where is the United States on the list?  Not in a position worth bragging about. 

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Olympics: people in numbers

Olympics: people in numbers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
BBC News takes a look at who makes up the cast of thousands behind the sporting event of the year.

 

The Olympics are a massive undertaking with both local and international impacts. 

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If the World Where a Village of 100 People...

What if the world's population were reduced to 100 people community?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners.  For more information see: http://www.miniature-earth.com/

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10 Famous Clock Towers From Around the World

10 Famous Clock Towers From Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
10 Famous Clock Towers From Around the World - http://t.co/0jQRve4x (via @Twitt_Geography)...

 

This is a fun collection that captures the architecture of an era that valued large public timepieces as symbols of modernity and progress.  If we aren't seeing the construction of new grand clocks, what are 21st century symbols of modernity and progress in public spaces? 

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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 3, 2012 10:52 PM
Globalization has received a negative reaction from groups of likeminded individuals that feel as though increased interaction s will threaten the solidarity of their culture. Likewise other may feel as though the line between modernization and the “West” is too thin to make a clear distinction. However in these images many of these clock structures have a very clear cultural distinction to them such as the crescent on top of the Al-Bait Towers in Saudi Arabia. As modernization continues to alter the architecture of places around the world these building are likely to retain familiar cultural characteristics that can be recognized. Besides skyscrapers I think other symbols of modernization can be seen in chain stores and restraints like Starbucks or McDonalds as the services vary from place to place finding a medium between the combination of familiarity and strangeness.
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:56 AM
Clocks are sign of modernity, industrialism. The clock is a an important cultural symbol for modern workers, the hours/minutes/day are more important than the seasons are/were for more agricultural societies.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 4, 2012 9:23 PM
Clocks embody an 18th and 19th century vision of modernity, one based on the technology of the day. Today, they are a icons but today they are superfluous. Will they continue to be a major part of public places? Some like Big Ben in London are so famous that the must endure but I don't see new cities thinking that a massive clock tower would be a needed addition to the city.
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Flags By Colors

Flags By Colors | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Flags of the world as piecharts.Each sector of these piecharts is proportional to the area of the colour on the respective flag...

 

This interactive link is a great 'guesssing game' activity, especially if they have access to a "flags of the world" page in their textbook to use as a reference guide.  Originally found on the K-12 website http://www.engagetheirminds.com  

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London, the Olympics and Geography

London, the Olympics and Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Geographical Association has produced numerous resources specifically for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games being held in London.  The Olympics as an event work as an important teaching moment that operates on numerous scales.  What local developmental projects reshaped the urban fabric of London in preparation for these Games?  Do international events such as the Olympics foster a global community?  Is this idea of a global community perfectly harmonious?    

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Where is Matt?

Just in case you've never seen it, this is my favorite "horrible dancing" video.  Filmed in over 40 countries, the dancing is just a silly prop for the realy unfolding drama.  The gorgeous cultural and physical landscapes literally take center stage in this production.  The cultural icons, environmental settings and social context within which these images are spliced make this more than just "fluff" piece to distract the students.  It's a clip that can instill a desire to travel the world over to gain more geographic knowledge. 

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Lanastasiou's comment, January 30, 2012 2:13 PM
very funny video and it was interesting to see how each culture has their unique style of dancing!