Geography Education
1.7M views | +126 today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Labor Day 2015

Strengthening America's workforce. Sharing stories, news and info on U.S. workers, jobs, employment, safety and regulations. Learn more at www.dol.gov
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights (see the Labor Day 2012 video as well).  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

more...
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:06 AM

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights (see the Labor Day 2012 video as well).  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Amsterdam Canals

It was busy today on the Canals in Amsterdam. Especially at the junction Prinsengracht/Leidsegracht.


TagsNetherlands, transportationplace, neighborhood, landscape, time lapsevideo.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Could this transportation network and system work everywhere?  If not, geography and place are critical factors to shaping the human landscape. 

more...
John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, August 31, 2015 2:19 PM

Look at how self-organised this works perfectly. It's just a matter of how you can solve things together.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Living in the Shadow of Industrial Farming

"The world eats cheap bacon at the expense of North Carolina's rural poor." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

In a recent article by QZ (the video above comes from the same investigation), they explore the negative impacts of the pork industry.  People love their bacon memes, but forget about social and environmental impacts of an increased global trend towards higher pork consumption


Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture, agricultural environment, environment, environment modify, pollution. 

more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 17, 2015 1:50 PM

Industrial farming, manure lagoons... do you know this type of farming?

Lilydale High School's curator insight, August 17, 2015 7:33 PM

Consequences of living near industrial sites - even if it is farming.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:23 PM

This is pretty insane. I've seen other video's where it is a similar situation around chicken farms in the U.S. The people can't even go outside most of the time due to the smell, and it makes me wonder how much of the way we eat is truly devastating the planet. Beyond the smell, I can't help wonder what these types of farms would do the ground water beneath.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

more...
Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 2015 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Which country has the biggest economy?

An animated infographic showing the top three economies throughout history. Does China have the world's largest economy? Is China's economy bigger than America's?


Tags: economic, China, development, India.

more...
Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 2:31 PM

I think this was honestly super cool. It was interesting to see the massive size of the economies of China and India throughout history, especially coming from a background of eurocentric approaches to history in our education system. It's interesting to grow up hearing about the formidable size and power of the Roman Empire, only to discover that its power was dwarfed by two other empires, who have dominated their part of the globe for much of human history. It was stunning to see just how much the industrial revolution changed the geopolitical landscape; we learn about it and its affects in school, but I feel like the fact that it very much was a "revolution" is lost on kids. The world was completely altered by the advent of mass production, as evidenced by the swing of economic power from East to West following the revolution. It was also impressive to see just how large the American economy was in the 1950's. However, the tides have begun to turn, as we are quickly seeing the ascent of the Chinese economy once again, with India slowly getting back on track as well. With a population of over 1 billion people, India is the world's largest democracy, and has the potential to be a superpower on a scale that the world has never seen before.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:47 PM

i would never have thought that china and india would have dominated would economy throughout the past, now it is not that much of a suprise, but especially during the times where france britain and italy (romans) dominated the world, how is it possible that india and china were so far ahead of them economically?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

40 years of human activities you can see from space

Satellites have been watching us for 40 years. Here's what their images reveal.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is simple entry point into the various applications of remote sensing as well as various human and environmental interactions. This video highlights 5 examples: 

1. Deforestation (Brazil)

2. Water Use (Aral Sea)

3. Urban Sprawl (Las Vegas)

4. Energy (Coal in Wyoming)

5. Climate Change (Ice Shelf in Antarctica)


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples, K12, land use, environment.

more...
Fe'iloakitau Kaho Tevi's curator insight, June 18, 2015 5:57 PM

Amazing to see  progress and its consequences on earth...our resources and the insatiable hunger for natural resources.....when is enough, enough?

Ambre Cooper's curator insight, June 25, 2015 4:04 PM

This is a cool little video. It even shows the level of Aral Sea we read about.

Hamdou Wane's curator insight, June 29, 2015 7:55 AM

Satellites have been watching us for 40 years. Here's what their images reveal

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

What the Earth would look like if all the ice melted

We learned last year that many of the effects of climate change are irreversible. Sea levels have been rising at a greater rate year after year, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates they could rise by another meter or more by the end of this century.
more...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Plate Tectonics and the Formation of Central America and the Caribbean

This animation is made from a time series of maps reconstructing the movements of continental crust or blocks, as South America pulled away from North America, starting 170 million years ago. Note that South America is still clinging to Africa at the beginning of the series.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The land bridge connecting North and South America is hardly permanent (on a geological time scale that is).  This video is an animated version of the still maps from this article.  


Tags: Mexico, tectonicsphysical, video, Middle America.

more...
Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:54 AM

The intriguing thing about this video is that it puts into perspective the amount of time that humans have been on this earth. In in less than a million years we have gone from not existing to shaping the ground that we walk on.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:46 AM

Summer reading KQ1

s stout's curator insight, June 8, 4:45 PM
Unit 1
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Anatomy of a Tornado

Jim Cantore gives an INCREDIBLE step-by-step description and 3D view into how a tornado forms - like you've never seen before!


Tags: physical, weather and climate, visualization.

more...
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 22, 2015 7:37 PM

JIM CANTORE MUESTRA PASO A PASO EL DESARROLLO DE UN TORNADO EN 3D

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:41 PM

This amazing video shows everything from funnel clouds and weak tornadoes to F5, tornadoes which cause major damage. It explains how a tornado originates from a super cell (rotating thunderstorm) to how it forms from a rear flank downdraft. 

When identifying the formation of a tornado and the direction in which it will be heading, satellite imagery and aerial photography are needed for accurate data.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:41 AM

Summer reading KQ3 What are the major contributing factors to environmental change today? key concept of transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:11 AM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, video, National Geographic, visualization.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Rare Look Inside Antarctic Explorers’ Huts

After 10 years of conservation efforts, the huts that once housed the likes of Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest Shackleton are ready for a new generation.


TagsAntarctica, National Geographic.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Living in the Age of Airplanes

"LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES is a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, it renews our appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world." airplanesmovie.com

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economicNational Geographic, video, visualization.

more...
majorlever's comment, May 1, 2015 11:29 PM
Good one
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 2, 2015 11:57 PM

global interconnections!!

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 2016 8:04 PM

I was absolutely delighted to see this film on the big screen...it was as visually stunning as any film I'd ever seen.  I and my young children were mesmerized.  So much of the modern world that we take for granted is absolutely revolutionary.  This is a great teacher's guide to teaching with this film.


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, National Geographic, video, visualization.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Earth's tectonic plates skitter about

Earth's tectonic plates skitter about | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Geoscientists have unveiled a computer model that maps the details of that tectonic dance in 1-million-year increments—practically a frame-by-frame recap of geologic time. It shows that the plates speed up, slow down, and move around in unexpectedly short bursts of activity. It also suggests that researchers may have to rethink what drives much of that incessant motion.  The new model shows that although plates usually creep along at an average speed of about 4 centimeters per year, some can reach much faster speeds in short sprints. For example, India, which broke off the east coast of Africa about 120 million years and is now plowing into Asia, reached speeds as high as 20 centimeters per year for a relatively brief 10 million years."


Tagstectonicsphysicalgeomorphology, video.

more...
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 27, 2015 5:52 PM

"Los geocientíficos han dado a conocer un modelo de computadora que asigna los detalles de esa danza tectónico en 1 millón de años incrementos de una recapitulación fotograma a fotograma de tiempo geológico. Esto demuestra que las placas aceleran, frenan, y se mueven alrededor de pequeños estallidos de actividad. también sugiere que los investigadores pueden tener que repensar lo que impulsa gran parte de ese movimiento incesante. El nuevo modelo muestra que, aunque por lo general se arrastran a lo largo de las placas a una velocidad media de unos 4 centímetros por año, algunos pueden alcanzar velocidades mucho más rápidas en carreras cortas. Por ejemplo, la India, que estalló frente a la costa oriental de África a unos 120 millones de años y ahora está arando en Asia, alcanza velocidades de hasta 20 centímetros por año durante un tiempo relativamente breves 10 millones años ".

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Rust Belt Rebirth Through Gentrification?

It’s become difficult to afford urban living in places like San Francisco, New York or even Portland, but there is an alternative. In Rust Belt cities like Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Cincinnati, you can buy or rent for about 1/10th the price.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've discussed Cincinnati's gentrification several times here, but this video adds the personal touch where you can see into the mind, ethos and motives of those moving in to poorer neighborhoods with hopes to renovate a community where the logic of 'disinvestment' has prevailed for decades.  Gentrification is often criticized for displacing the urban poor, but this shows how some are eager to tie themselves into the fabric of the neighborhood as the neighborhood is changing; they aren't just wealthy people buying out the poor. 


Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

more...
Hailey Austin's curator insight, May 11, 2:34 PM
 This is related to what I'm learning in class because its talking about urbanization. It talks about how a man visits a very run down place and invest in fixing it up a bit. He rebuilt a house/building. It made the city look better. My opinion on the article is that its a very good deed. Bringing a city back to life is a wonderful thing. 
Harley Bass's curator insight, May 11, 2:35 PM
This connects to are lesson on chapter thirteen through gentrification. My opinion on this video is that gentrification in this neighborhood is good because it is bringing life back to its local community. Gentrification can be a bad thing in some neighborhoods though because it can force poor families out of their home.
kyleigh hall's curator insight, May 12, 11:21 PM
This article is about a person who bought a house in the suburb areas of New York. He put certain things in his house that is all historically or better for the world. This relates to what we are learning in world cultural geography because we are learning about the suburbs area and inner city areas of places. In my opinion it related to what we learned about a lot also I liked what he did with the stuff he used. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Lakes On A Glacier

"How deep is that icy blue water on Greenland's ice sheet? Dr. Allen Pope, of the National Snow and Ice Data Center, is using data from the NASA/USGS Landsat 8 satellite to find out. In this video, Dr. Pope shares what he sees when he looks at a Landsat image of the Greenland ice sheet just south of the Jakobshavn Glacier.

Because the lakes are darker than the ice around them, they absorb more energy from the sun. A little bit of melt concentrates in one place, and then melts more, establishing a feedback mechanism accelerating the growth of the lake. When the lakes get big enough they can force open fractures that then drill all the way down to the bed of the glacier, transporting this water to the base where it can temporarily speed up the flow of the ice."


Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland, remote sensing, geospatial.

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:06 PM

unit 1 and summer read

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How religion(s) spread across the world

How religion(s) spread across the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it
VIDEO: 5,000 years of religious history in two minutes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions.  What are the cultural barriers to the diffusion of one of these particular religions?  What geographic factors helped to facilitate the expansion of one of these world religions?   


Tags: religiondiffusion, culture, ChristianityIslamBuddhismHinduismJudaism,
unit 3 culture.


more...
Clayton Nelson's comment, April 4, 2016 10:09 AM
It is amazing to see how quickly some religions spread compared to others especially once the Islamic religion began. Also i believe its a great thing that during the age of discovery, religions were taken over to the new world with those who traveled there.
Alexis Michelle's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:11 AM

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions. Each of these religions have been "born" somewhere and have grown to different countries. Everyone has a religion well most of everyone and I believe it is very important to know the history of the religion that you are or fit into.


Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.


Blake Bass's curator insight, April 7, 10:05 AM
This article is very excellent at explaining where religions are and why they are there,this article relates to human geography and what we are learning because it explains the most practiced religions and where they are.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Florida, before Disney

Florida, before Disney | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Watch Mike Wallace's 60 Minutes report from 1972 to see the Florida that existed before Mickey and millions of tourists descended on Orlando.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 11 minute video from the archives is a great profile of a community in flux.  Orange County, Florida was transitioning from an agricultural region off the grid to a largest tourist destination in the United States.  Obviously, the community's economic geography completely transformed, but the cultural shift to the region was equally drastic.  Since Disney today is such a well-known brand and so many students have been to Disney World, they will enjoy seeing what the community was like before it became an entertainment mecca. 


Tags: place, tourism, economichistorical.

more...
Rebecca Cofield's curator insight, August 5, 2015 6:10 PM

This 11 minute video from the archives is a great profile of a community in flux.  Orange County, Florida was transitioning from an agricultural region off the grid to a largest tourist destination in the United States.  Obviously, the community's economic geography completely transformed, but the cultural shift to the region was equally drastic.  Since Disney today is such a well-known brand and so many students have been to Disney World, they will enjoy seeing what the community was like before it became an entertainment mecca. 

 

Tags: place, tourism, economic, historical.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Papua New Guinea

"Papua New Guinea gained independence from Australia in 1975 and has over 800 languages;  87% of the population lives in rural areas." 


Tags: Papua New Guinea, Oceania.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is a part of World Vision Australia's school resources.  These resources for Papua New Guinea focus on health and human well-being.   

more...
Chris Costa's curator insight, December 1, 2015 4:20 PM

I found this video to be very interesting, providing a brief overview of contemporary Papua New Guinea and the struggles the nation faces as we push deeper into the 21st century. Once a colonial possession of Australia, the nation gained its independence in 1975, although it retains close relations with its former colonizer; Australia is the nation's greatest provider of foreign aid. Although great strides have been made in areas such as education, health, and infrastructure, the nation lags far behind the West in terms of industrial development; just 58% of Guineans are literate, with a meager 3% of reads being paved, and the average Guinean having a lifespan some 20 years shorter than their Australian contemporaries. Although this may seem backwards to many Westerners, Guineans are proud of a rich, vibrant culture, with some 800 languages being spoken on the island. With each language representing a different culture, it becomes apparent how diverse the population really is, achieving a level of cultural complexity that has oftentimes been discouraged in today's Western world. We would do well to embrace the differences that are celebrated today in Papua New Guinea. While it is hoped that improved education will ultimately lead to a higher standard of living for all the people of Papua New Guinea, this writer hopes they don't lose track of the differences that make them so wondrous in a world that is oftentimes so intolerant of others.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 7, 2015 2:49 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon's page, some of the stats are mind boggling and they are actually portrayed as being good. For example, while 87% of the population is rural, 58% are literate. I figured the literacy numbers would be rather poor in a country where the entire population lives in rural areas, but I didn't think that 58% literacy would be something worth bragging about. Maybe except in North Korea.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

99 Percent Invisible

Roman Mars is obsessed with flags — and after you watch this talk, you might be, too. These ubiquitous symbols of civic pride are often designed, well, pretty terribly. But they don't have to be. In this surprising and hilarious talk about vexillology — the study of flags — Mars reveals the five basic principles of flag design and shows why he believes they can be applied to just about anything.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I’m not ashamed to admit that I love flags; I enjoy thinking about the cultural, economic and geopolitical symbolism embedded in the flags and what that means for the places they represent.  I share the above video for that purpose, but more importantly because it is an introduction to the audio podcast 99 Percent Invisible with a special ‘behind-the-scenes’ peek and how this podcast on flag design was made (and here is a snarky critique of all U.S. state flags).  Great geography resources rarely fall under the title “Geography” with a capital G.  It takes geographic training to “see the geography” in the world around us.  I’ve recently discovered the 99 Percent Invisible Podcast and while it is not explicitly (or even always) geographic, it is loaded with excellent materials about design and the details of the world around us that often go unnoticed, but deserve greater scrutiny.  For example the episodes on the Port of Dallas as well as reversing of the Chicago River show how the physical and human systems intersect within urban areas.  These two geo-engineering projects also were conceived on in very particular social, economic and technological contexts.

I also loved the episode Monumental Dilemma, about the uncomfortable 1800s New England memorialization of Hannah Duston for scalping Native Americans…this is incredibly awkward culturally as our society and social values have changes over the years.  Do we tear it down? Ignore it?  Apologize?  Since the historical legacy is unsettled, so is the monument.  So I’ll keep listening to the 99 Percent Invisible podcast and please recommend some especially geographic past episodes as I dig through the archives.                

 

Tagspodcast, architecture, TED.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

"The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on."


Tags: development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I can't say I agree with all the arguments put forward in this video, it can still be a nice starting point to get students to critically analyze the ideas put forth and assess the merits of the claims being made.

more...
Rob Duke's comment, July 30, 2015 3:34 PM
...certainly privilege from times past when there were no international watchdogs comes into play, but even when we control for colonialism, certain countries do much better than others. I'm inclined to think like Jared Diamond (The World Until Yesterday) and David Landes (The Wealth and Poverty of Nations. 1998) that institutions matter. If we protect property, provide vertical institutional support while also making room in the shadow of the law for ad hoc cooperation (see Elinor Ostrom's work), and protect intellectual property rights, we tend to have more wealth developed.
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:49 PM

I can't say I agree with all the arguments put forward in this video, it can still be a nice starting point to get students to critically analyze the ideas put forth and assess the merits of the claims being made.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 13, 11:15 AM
unit 6
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Map Projections

This video describes what map projections are, and how the Earth can be represented using map projections within a GIS.


Tags: Mapping, video, map projections, cartography.

more...
Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 2015 3:14 PM

This video relates to Use of geospatial technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), and online maps. It tells about how the world is a 3D shape, but we view it as 2D, which leads to distortions in world size. The use of GIS allows for the world to be projected onto any shape such as a cone, rectangle, prism, or pyramid. And this leads to the different map projections. 

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:31 AM

Ch 1 Map Projections

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 2015 9:41 PM

Maps

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

U.S. Territories

A set of Supreme Court decisions made over 100 years ago has left U.S. territories without meaningful representation. That’s weird, right?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Disclaimer: this does come from HBO and the content might not be right for your classroom, but in classic John Oliver style he points out the political inequities that exist for those living in Puerto Rico, Guam and American Samoa. 


Tags: Puerto Rico, Oceania, political.  

more...
Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:06 AM

I think it is interesting one point that he brought up was the ability for someone who is born in a US territory may vote for president, however; if that candidate would like to win votes from his home territory he cannot. This is because the territory is unable to vote for presidents. Puerto Rico is also spoken of in which it highlights their ability to become a state and the difference they have in language.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 10:57 PM

This was amazing! I love him! I  am embarrassed to admit that i had no idea about any of this. I did not know that those territories were part of my country. This populations complete commitment to serving our country without any of the benefits is jaw dropping. We should be completely ashamed of our selves. I am honestly completely surprised that even in today's day in age this hasn't been fixed. Everything about this is unconstitutional. How this case loses in a court is beyond me. One of the things that stood out to me the most was the fact that 67% of Guam shows up to vote in though their votes dont count and yet only 61% of all of the US does...that embarrassing. We have clearly taken for granted our freedom to vote.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:50 AM

The plight of our territories is a smudge on our nations character. The most controversial of these issues is Puerto Ricos status as a territory of the United States. Puerto Ricans are United States citizens by law, yet they have no representation in their government. They can not vote in presidential elections, have no real representation in the congress except their non voting delegate, and they have no representation in the electoral college.  Something must be done, to rectify this situation. A possible solution may be to pass a 23rd amendment for Puerto Rico. The 23rd Amendment provides residents of the nations capital the right to vote, and representation in the electoral college. DC is given a number of electoral votes equivalent to the least populous state. That number is 3 electoral votes. The amendment does not provide DC  with representation in the Congress. This Amendment has been controversial since the time of its ratification in 1961. Congress later repealed the amendment with a new DC voting rights amendment  that gave DC representation in Congress. The new Amendment failed to garner enough support amongst the states for ratification. To me the 23rd Amendment solution is the best possible compromise. It gives Puerto Rico representation, while persevering the rights and sanctity of the states.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatialmapping, video, ESRI.

more...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Romania's Geographic Challenge

Romania's Geographic Challenge | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Stratfor explains Romania's geographic challenge of remaining united while limiting the influence of larger surrounding powers. For more of these videos, visit http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT

Seth Dixon's insight:

Stratfor produced a new video in their "Geographic Challenge" series.  I've updated my map which spatially indexes 70+ of their videos that are especially relevant to geography teachers.  These videos are great starting points for students that are researching a particular country.


TagsRomania, mapping, video, geography education, geopoliticspolitical.

more...
Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:12 AM

Romania is close to a crossroads of Russian influence in the east and Western influence in the west. Of course the dichotomy isn't as stressed as in that of The Ukraine, but it is also an interesting thing to see that this has always been a dynamic in Romania. Russia has always been seen as a danger to the west and western Europe has always had a defining factor being contrasted against Russia.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Individual and the Global

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." --Maragret Mead

Seth Dixon's insight:

I share this video as a part of my final lecture in world regional geography as I attempt to tie up loose ends and help my students see the global linkages and connections.  Occasionally in the course of a semester where we examine global problems, it is easy to become pessimistic about the world.  In spite of all our problems, the world is becoming a better place, and I share this video to emphasize that individuals still have the power to act, and are not simply things to be acted upon by larger forces.  I can't change everything everywhere, but I can do something, somewhere...so do something.  


Tags: development, globalization.

more...
Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 3:55 PM

I love the notion and sometimes agree with this idea.  But at the same time it has to be sustained by the people.  It's this exciting idea to be a part of something, but that wears off quickly for a lot of people.  Then they are on to the next thing.  It would be nice if everyone would pick one cause and stay with it for atleast a year.  Maybe make this your New Years Resolution instead of hitting the gym.  

SNMinc WebGems's curator insight, May 8, 2015 5:16 AM

The unique power of one...

Avery Liardon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 10:43 AM

Very intriguing way to summarize the world and wrap up human geography. Reminds me of the pale blue dot speech, and really captures the big idea of how people and geography shape the world we live in.