Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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My Car Pays Cheaper Rent Than Me

My Car Pays Cheaper Rent Than Me | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In our dense cities where land is valuable and housing is expensive, why do our cars pay cheaper rent than people?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Everyone searching for a parking space has at one time felt that there are not enough spaces where and when you need them...did you know that their are at least 3 surface lot parking spaces for every car in the United States (not including garages, driveways, etc)?  With 250 million passenger vehicles for 316 million people, that means there are 800 million surface lot parking spaces (that account for only 60-70% of our parking needs).  Parking, and the ways in which parking is subsidized, are much bigger issues than many want to believe, especially when cars are given breaks that people don't.  We cant forget that there is a high cost for free parking.  

 

Tags: urban, transportation, planning.

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Global Cities

"The evolving role of cities and regions presents planning challenges as urban areas are work to achieve particular social, economic and environmental goals. This video explores a range of cities to examine how fully integrated planning, design, engineering and management capabilities can help to improve cities."


Tags: urban, planning, urbanism, architecture.

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 15, 2015 7:41 PM

An advertisement but interesting

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Mapping the Sexism of Street Names in Major Cities

Mapping the Sexism of Street Names in Major Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a study of seven world metros, only a little more than a quarter of the streets were named for women.


Tags: gendermapping, urbantoponyms.

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The World’s Largest Urban Area Grew Overnight

The World’s Largest Urban Area Grew Overnight | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rapid growth in several cities along the Pearl River Delta has made a Chinese megacity larger and more populous than any other urban area in the world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What was a rural landscape dominated by rice paddy fields just a few decades ago is now home to the largest Metropolitan region in the world (depending on who is counting and what areas they are including).  The "slider" comparison of these two satellite images taken of the same area in 1988 and 2014 is staggering (click here for an animated GIF of the same imagery).   


Tags: urbanremote sensing, megacities, China, urban ecology.

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Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 16, 2015 8:50 PM

Already this image is showing a clear impact that the massive increase in population is having on the landscape. The delata has narrowed and so has the major rivers. As population grows in mega cities like this so doesnt the increase for resources such as water, also when it increases this quickly sanitation practices decrease. One can only imagine the inpact on water quality this is also having.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:46 AM

It is amazing how fast a modern city can come about when there is no historical city to base the subsequent growth on.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 16, 2015 3:39 PM

It is astounding the amount of growth this one city has had in one decade and reminds me of some of the rapid development within the Middle East since the 70s which transformed cities like Dubai. Ecologically like most of what China does it is a disaster but fascinating from a development  one. Unfortunately the article doesn't offer a population so that it could be compared to Tokyo's since a size comparison was done in terms of land use. Hopefully China will find a sustainable method of growth because if city continue to grow like this it will be surprising if they could maintain stability. I personally thing this rapid growth is dangerous and like India they likely won't be able to keep up. Additionally since China's economy is very reliant on this type of growth it is concerning to think of what may happen to many of these cities when the growth they rely on stops.

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Can you identify these world cities from their street plans alone?

Can you identify these world cities from their street plans alone? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We’ve stripped out the street names and lost the labels – but can you still recognise the cities from their aerial views?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fun map quiz that is part memory, but also relies on pattern recognition to see if you can understand the urban morphology that shaped these places.  I got 11 out of 13...can anybody top that?  I'm sure someone can; give it a shot.  


Tagsplanning, architecture, urban, regions, trivia, games.

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Lawn Order

Lawn Order | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In communities across America, lawns that are brown or overgrown are considered especially heinous. Elite squads of dedicated individuals have been deputized by their local governments or homeowners’ associations to take action against those whose lawns fail to meet community standards."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that shows not only the environmental aspects of America’s obsession with well-manicured lawns, it also nicely explored the cultural norms that police our behavior to create the stereotypical suburban landscape.  This is my favorite quote from the podcast: “There’s a paradox to the lawn. On the one hand, it is the pedestal on which sits the greatest symbol of the American Dream: the home, which people can ostensibly govern however they wish. And yet—homeowners often have almost no control over how they should maintain their lawn. Grass may be a plant, but a lawn is a designed object.”


Tags: housingneighborhood, cultural norms, consumption, water, environmenturban ecology, culture.


"When the well's dry, we know the worth of water." ~Benjamin Franklin

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New Old Town

New Old Town | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Like many cities in Central Europe, Warsaw is made up largely of grey, ugly, communist block-style architecture. Except for one part:  The Old Town. Walking through the historic district, it’s just like any other quaint European city. There are tourist shops, horse-drawn carriage rides, church spires. The buildings are beautiful—but they are not original."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a compelling 99 Percent Invisible podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 


Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

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aitouaddaC's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:12 AM

This is a compelling podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 

 

Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

Beth Marinucci's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:45 PM

This is a compelling podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 

 

Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

Yolanta Krawiecki's curator insight, August 7, 2015 5:30 PM

This is a compelling podcast linking architecture, heritage, political ideology and the built environment.  How we preserve and create place is put on trial as to when something is benign, fabricated, authentic, or simply a complicated balance between opposing forces. 

 

Tags: planning, architecture, urban, place,

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The science of slums - Geographical

The science of slums - Geographical | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In an edited extract from his new book, Danny Dorling, professor of human geography at the University of Sheffield, argues that the idea of the population bomb is a fallacy and that the human population is checking its rise without the need for a grand plan
Seth Dixon's insight:

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 


Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:39 PM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:26 AM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:07 AM

mega cities 

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Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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100 African Cities Destroyed By Europeans

100 African Cities Destroyed By Europeans | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When tourists visit sub-Saharan Africa, they often wonder 'Why there are no historical buildings or monuments?'  The reason is simple. Europeans destroyed most of them. We only have a few drawings and descriptions by travelers who visited the places before their destruction. In some places, ruins are still visible. Many cities were abandoned when Europeans brought exotic diseases (smallpox and influenza) which started spreading and killing people. Most of those cities lie hidden. In fact the biggest part of Africa history is still under the ground."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is a good introduction to historical African urbanism.  It is also a powerful reminder that the landscape does not only teach us based on what we see--the landscape can be a powerful witness by reminding us of the what is glaringly absent. 


Tags: historical, urban, placeAfricacolonialism.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:27 PM

The issues with poverty and hunger that grip certain parts of Africa- particularly the sub-Sahara- find their roots in the utter subversion and destruction of African societies and states during the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and the subsequent colonization of Africa. European traders placed significant strain of existing African states during the 14th and 15th centuries, as the emergence of "slave states" and the extent of the trade completely changed the demographics of much of Africa. Labor shortages lead to technological shortfalls as well as the dissolution of many African states, as predatory states continued to destroy many civilizations and cultures. By the time that the majority of the West had banned the trade in the 19th century, the damage had already been done; many of the great civilizations of Africa had regressed or been entirely wiped out under the pressure of Europe's demand for slaves. The subsequent colonization of the continent only worsened matters for the Africans, as major hubs of civilization were captured, raided, and destroyed. Traditional societies were subjected to European influences and religion and eventually lost, and yet Europeans looked at the destruction and the lack of economic and political progress their actions had caused and blamed it on the inferiority of the Africans themselves. History has not been kind to Africa, and it is important to remember that that is not her fault. Many civilizations, cities, and states were lost as a direct result of contact with Europeans during the slave trade and the subsequent colonization of the continent. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 6:34 AM

Before European contact, Africa had a number of great urban cities. European arrival foresaw the destruction of those once grand cities. The Europeans brought diseases such as smallpox and influenza to the African continent. Those diseases would hamper the previously unexposed African population. Slavery also drained Africa of millions of people as well. Great African civilizations were brought down by these various calamities. European  arrival was the death knell of the great African civilizations. Africa is still living with this legacy of destruction. Africa is the most rural region in the world, because of this legacy.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:07 PM

Just another way to eliminate any African culture or customs.

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The Evolution of Urban Planning in 10 Diagrams

The Evolution of Urban Planning in 10 Diagrams | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new exhibit from the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association showcases the simple visualizations of complex ideas that have changed how we live.
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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, June 13, 2015 2:16 PM

Article en anglais

Sally Egan's curator insight, June 13, 2015 8:55 PM

Some ideas from urban planning which clarify the morphology of urban places.

 

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Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now

Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Let's make "10 not 12!" a new mantra for saving our cities and towns.


[12 foot lanes] are wrong because of a fundamental error that underlies the practice of traffic engineering—and many other disciplines—an outright refusal to acknowledge that human behavior is impacted by its environment.


Tags: transportation, planningspatial, scale.

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Photographing mega-cities from 12,000 feet

Photographing mega-cities from 12,000 feet | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Photographer Vincent Laforet spent the early stages of 2015 photographing the likes of New York, Las Vegas, London, Sydney and Barcelona from a helicopter.


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities, images.

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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, December 6, 2015 10:19 PM

Great photo of city ... 

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Sense of Place

Seth Dixon's insight:

Kunstler argues that American architecture and urban planning are not creating public places that encourage interaction and communal engagement.  We should create more distinct places that foster a sense of place that is 'worth fighting for,' as opposed to suburbia which he sees as emblematic of these problems. 


Question to Ponder: How should we design cities to create a strong sense of place?  What elements are necessary? 


Tagsurban, planning, place, architecture, suburbs, video.

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L.Long's curator insight, November 20, 2015 7:04 PM

Culture of Place

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 22, 2015 5:28 PM

Provides great example of the concepts of Place and Lieveability.

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National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans | Geography Education | Scoop.it

DEMOGRAPHICS OF HOMELESS VETERANS

12% of the homeless adult population are veterans
20% of the male homeless population are veterans
68% reside in principal cities
51% of individual homeless veterans have disabilities
50% have serious mental illness
70% have substance abuse problems

Seth Dixon's insight:

Things to remember on Veteran's Day...homelessness is a major problem for the urban geography of most American cities and veterans are disproportionately affected (including Providence, RI).  Let's remember them on the 364 other days of the year too. 


Tags: urban, poverty, military.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 2015 8:58 PM

Things to remember on Veteran's Day...homelessness is a major problem for the urban geography of most American cities and veterans are disproportionately affected (including Providence, RI).  Let's remember them on the 364 other days of the year too. 


Tags: urban, poverty, military.

God Is.'s curator insight, November 15, 2015 11:30 AM

How about taking care of our own FIRST?

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 16, 2015 1:27 PM

Being a Marine myself I think of it everyday already. Its sad that at  a young age of 17 with parent consent and a high school diploma or 18 on up a person male or female can enlist into the military and put their life on the line regardless of wartime or not and somehow or someway find themselves homeless or worse homeless with substance abuse and mental illness all at the same time. Keep in mind this was not the issue before enlisting. This, if I am not mistaken as always been a problem for all the years we had a military. Marine Corp birthday 10 November 1776.

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How Chicago became the country's alley capital

How Chicago became the country's alley capital | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How Chicago became the alley capital of the country and why so much of the rest of the region is conspicuously alley-free.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The alley is a reminder of past visions of how to best lay out a city.  In the 19th century, back when Chicago started booming, the city was laid out in a grid and it quickly became a filthy, stinky, disease-ridden place. "Rear service lanes were essential for collecting trash, delivering coal, and stowing human waste — basically, keeping anything unpleasant away from living quarters."  As we have moved towards curvilinear residential streets and more discrete public utilities, the newer neighborhoods abandoned the alley, but they are still very prominent in old neighborhoods (click here for an interactive map to explore all of Chicago's alleys). 

Also, Chicago's suburbs have lofty names (Mount, Heights, Ridge, etc.)  that don't match this flat topography--read here to find out why.  


Tags: Chicago, urban, placetoponyms, planning, urbanism.

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Dear smug urbanites, stop ridiculing the suburb I love

Dear smug urbanites, stop ridiculing the suburb I love | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I’m always disappointed that my urban acquaintances know very little of the suburbs surrounding their city. But I’m never more disappointed than when urbanites spout clichéd opinions about suburban living.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a interesting op-ed that defends suburban living when many critics of routinely argue that the suburbs symbolize what's wrong with American urbanism.  


Tags: neighborhoodsuburbs, op-ed.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 9, 2015 4:53 PM

Perspective on suburban life 

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Rust Belt Rebirth Through Gentrification?

It’s become difficult to afford urban living in places like San Francisco, New York or even Portland, but there is an alternative. In Rust Belt cities like Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Cincinnati, you can buy or rent for about 1/10th the price.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've discussed Cincinnati's gentrification several times here, but this video adds the personal touch where you can see into the mind, ethos and motives of those moving in to poorer neighborhoods with hopes to renovate a community where the logic of 'disinvestment' has prevailed for decades.  Gentrification is often criticized for displacing the urban poor, but this shows how some are eager to tie themselves into the fabric of the neighborhood as the neighborhood is changing; they aren't just wealthy people buying out the poor. 


Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economicAPHG, Cincinnati

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Hailey Austin's curator insight, May 11, 2:34 PM
 This is related to what I'm learning in class because its talking about urbanization. It talks about how a man visits a very run down place and invest in fixing it up a bit. He rebuilt a house/building. It made the city look better. My opinion on the article is that its a very good deed. Bringing a city back to life is a wonderful thing. 
Harley Bass's curator insight, May 11, 2:35 PM
This connects to are lesson on chapter thirteen through gentrification. My opinion on this video is that gentrification in this neighborhood is good because it is bringing life back to its local community. Gentrification can be a bad thing in some neighborhoods though because it can force poor families out of their home.
kyleigh hall's curator insight, May 12, 11:21 PM
This article is about a person who bought a house in the suburb areas of New York. He put certain things in his house that is all historically or better for the world. This relates to what we are learning in world cultural geography because we are learning about the suburbs area and inner city areas of places. In my opinion it related to what we learned about a lot also I liked what he did with the stuff he used. 
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Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos

Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tourists and locals experience cities in strikingly different ways. To see just how different these two worlds are, have a look at the map of Washington D.C. above based on where people take photos. The red bits indicate photos taken by tourists, while the blue bits indicate photos taken by locals and the yellow bits might be either."

Seth Dixon's insight:

It amazes me how the same city can provide such diverse experiences to so many people.  Growing up in San Diego, going to the zoo was only our family's radar when company was over and they wanted to "see San Diego."  Their vision of the place, what is iconic and what is quintessentially symbolic of that place, was different from my own. 


Questions to Ponder: What are some other ways (besides local/tourist) that a place can be experienced by other groups?  How many of these 136 cities can you identify from these tourist/local patterns? 



Tagsmapping, social media, urban, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Marc Meynardi's curator insight, August 24, 2015 7:44 AM

Very interesting

 

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:32 AM

cities photos

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Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design)

Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Air conditioners have made architects lazy, and we've forgotten how to design houses that might work without it.


A hundred years ago, a house in Florida looked different than a house in New England. The northern house might be boxy, have relatively small windows, almost always two stories with low ceilings, and a big fireplace in the middle. 

In Florida, the house might have high ceilings, tall double-hung windows, and deep porches. Trees would be planted around the house to block the sun. 

Today, houses pretty much look the same wherever you go in North America, and one thing made this possible: central air conditioning. Now, the United States uses more energy for air conditioning than 1 billion people in Africa use for everything.


Tags: planning, architecture, housingurban, place, environment adaptenergyconsumption.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 23, 2015 1:12 PM

A GOOD STORY ABOUT AIR CONDITIONING

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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy


Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.

Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

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François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 2015 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 2015 9:02 AM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

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Detroit's Beautiful, Horrible Decline

Detroit's Beautiful, Horrible Decline | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Two French photographers immortalize the remains of the motor city on film.  Pictured above is the Packard Plant; luxury-auto maker Packard produced its last car here in 1956.  To see more work by Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre, visit their website.

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Geopolitics Are Influencing a New Urbanism in Tehran

Geopolitics Are Influencing a New Urbanism in Tehran | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Iranian capital is replacing anti-Western billboards with works of art, and welcoming new architecture by world-class designers.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 2015 10:16 AM

Culture, Politics, Urban Geography, all wrapped up in Iran

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Poverty (1964): Cincinnati Slums

TELEVISION DOCUMENTARY: Examines the slum areas of Cincinnati, Ohio, and provides extensive views of substandard housing in various parts of the city. Describes the problems of the uneducated and unemployed who cannot escape from poverty, but finds a "ray of hope" in a young school child. Offers no solution for eliminating urban poverty, but states that everyone "must try."
Seth Dixon's insight:

While some of the technological presentation and the intellectual framework are certainly outdated, it is a glimpse into how America thought about poverty during the LBJ administration and the famous "War on Poverty."


Tagsurban, economic, Cincinnati, historical, poverty, socioeconomic.

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