Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes

Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A pictorial investigation bureau, at your service.


Social media has fundamentally changed how information is disseminated.  Many photos that are spread on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest can be 'doctored' or mislabeled since citizen journalists aren't held to the same standard of verifying their sources.  In the abundance of information, sorting out fact from fiction can be quite difficult.  Social media has made me a more of a skeptic, and I try not to post a picture that I it can't find it's original source.     

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The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation

The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Kauffman Foundation's Samuel Arbesman on his new book, The Half-Life of Facts.


This is an interview, Samuel Arbesman,the author of The Half-Life of Facts explains how population density and place matter in forming a creative economic workforce. Urban centers act as drivers of innovation and advancements and attract the more ambitious and daring workers. Additionally, this map on the expansion of the printing press (discussed in the interview) is also a great map to show how technological innovations can spur cultural diffusion.


Tags: technology, diffusion, urban, labor, migration, book review.

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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...


The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?


Tags: popular culture, video, diffusion, globalization, culture, place, technology, unit 3 culture

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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 2:27 PM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...


This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 


  1. Technology-Phones mean freedom
  2. Health-Healthy communities prosper
  3. Economy-Green energy equals good business
  4. Equality-Women rule
  5. Justice-The fight for the future is now


Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   

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GPS or Maps?

GPS or Maps? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

We are a society that is reliant on modern navigational devices.  This is an interesting article that argues for keeping modern equipment, but asks us not to eliminate older technologies in our haste to embrace the shiny and new.  "Technology as great as it is should never be a replacement for skills, but a tool used to assist you."


Tags: GPS, technology, spatial.   

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melissa stjean's comment, September 15, 2012 4:15 PM
Driving in New York City is as scary as it gets with all the craziness going on everywhere. When my GPS signal decided to go out was not a fun time, thankfully in my car i had a real map of the city to come to my rescue. I totally agree with this article because although new technology is great, it can give out on you at any time. So knowing how to read and use real maps is crucial when driving in new territories.
Jeff F's comment, September 17, 2012 6:49 PM
I love gps, however, I always look at a map before hand and get an idea of what the major streets in the area are. GPS also sometimes does not take into effect things like bridges being down. Two months ago, I was trying to find some place and my gps kept trying to lead me to a bridge which was closed. I ended up zooming out and looking at the map to know where the street was I was looking for. I then managed to find a route that lead around the bridge.
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Industrial Foods, Allergies and Cancers

Robyn shares her personal story and how it inspired her current path as a "Real Food" evangelist. Grounded in a successful Wall Street career that was more i...

 

Robyn authored "The Unhealthy Truth: How Our Food Is Making Us Sick and What We Can Do About It." A former Wall Street food industry analyst, Robyn brings insight, compassion and detailed analysis to her research into the impact that the global food system is having on the health of our children.  As new proteins are engineered into our food supply to maximize profits for the food industry, childhood food allergies are on the rise.  What are the connections between cancer and modern consumption patterns?  The correlation is clearly there; is causation also present?  How have the economics of agriculture shaped this situation?  How will the future economics of agriculture reshape food production? 

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NASA Satellite Tracking

NASA Satellite Tracking | Geography Education | Scoop.it

J-Track 3D Satellite Tracking is an online educational tool that maps hundreds of satellites as they orbit Earth.  One of the ironies of the space program is that it's greatest scientific advances from the space program is in observing our own planet instead of deep space.  J-Track 3-D should appear in its own window and plot the satellites in an interactive panel.  This is a great way to learn more about the remote sensing platforms that give us all the beautiful imagery of our planet.

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Amazon’s New Push for Same-Day Delivery Will Destroy Local Retail

Amazon’s New Push for Same-Day Delivery Will Destroy Local Retail | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Amazon has long enjoyed an unbeatable price advantage over its physical rivals. When I buy a $1,000 laptop from Wal-Mart, the company is required to collect local sales tax from me, so I pay almost $1,100 at checkout.

 

Just-in-Time production has reshaped the logistics of manufacturing.  How does same-day online delivery impact local retail businesses?  How might this change urban patterns of retail stores and of areas of warehouses?   

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 12, 2012 5:17 PM
People like to shop, not everyone but most. If there's one thing I've learned from being in retail all my working life it's that people need to hold and look and inspect something. Certainly you can return the item, but that takes time and sometimes extra money. The promise of physically seeing the item is better for most. The other side of the coin is people who simply can't get out or don't want to. For elderly or disabled who are computer literate they have ease of access and can just click on what they want to buy. Internet purchases unfortunately also are easier for fraud.. and it sounds to me that those lockers may be an even easier way for it to happen. Not to look on a darker side but that will increase sales too... for a short time anyway.
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Our Dwindling Food Variety

Our Dwindling Food Variety | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

"As we've come to depend on a handful of commercial varieties of fruits and vegetables, thousands of heirloom varieties have disappeared. It's hard to know exactly how many have been lost over the past century, but a study conducted in 1983 by the Rural Advancement Foundation International gave a clue to the scope of the problem. It compared USDA listings of seed varieties sold by commercial U.S. seed houses in 1903 with those in the U.S. National Seed Storage Laboratory in 1983. The survey, which included 66 crops, found that about 93 percent of the varieties had gone extinct. More up-to-date studies are needed." 

 

To show the other side of the issue, include this minor, yet crucial part of the article: "A 30-year-old plant pathologist named Norman Borlaug traveled to Mexico in 1944 to help fight a stem rust epidemic that had caused widespread famine. Crossing different wheat varieties from all over the world, he arrived at a rust-resistant, high-yield hybrid that helped India and Pakistan nearly double their wheat production—and saved a billion people from starvation. This so-called green revolution helped introduce modern industrialized agriculture to the developing world."

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 23, 2012 10:44 AM
This article raises multiple questions like, what has happened to all these different strains of vegetables? Why have the ones that are still around survived? Was this a process of natural selection? It would certainly be interesting to research this and uncover the reasons.
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:13 AM

This article is based on a study done by the Rural Advancement Foundation in 1983. Over the past century, it is hard to know what foods were lost and how many of each. But this study done by RAF gave us some information to solve the problem. It compared USDA listings of seed varieties sold by commercial U.S. seed houses in 1903 with those in the U.S. National Seed Storage Laboratory in 1983. The survey, which included 66 crops, found that about 93 percent of the varieties had gone extinct. 93 percent of these crops have gone extinct. That is a huge chunk that could be used as resources. This tree starts off with ten crops on it. The tree included: beet, cabbage, sweet corn, lettuce, muskmelon, peas, radish, squash, cucumbers, and tomatoes. In 1903, all these numbers were up, up, up. The lowest starting with beet at 288 ranging up to the highest with lettuce at 497. However, 80 years later in 1983, numbers dropped. The highest then shifted to tomatoes at 79 and the lowest shifted to sweet corn at 12.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, February 13, 12:18 PM

From a scientific view point it almost seems like we are making ourselves into specialists in an ecological / dietary way.  Limiting our available food resources and hoping against the odds that we don't suffer the same fate as other specialist species of the past.

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The Connected States of America

The Connected States of America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This interactive map shows the county to county social interactions given in total call minutes or total number of SMS from the anonymous, aggregated AT&T mobile phone data. Click into your county or type it into the text box to find out how it is connected to other counties in the US. You can switch between call and SMS data to reveal the changes in interaction mode. Also, the population map is provided, which is based on the 2010 Census."               -Martin Daumiller 

For more from this curator, see: http://www.scoop.it/t/wit-wisdom

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A Third Industrial Revolution

A Third Industrial Revolution | Geography Education | Scoop.it
OUTSIDE THE SPRAWLING Frankfurt Messe, home of innumerable German trade fairs, stands the “Hammering Man”, a 21-metre kinetic statue that steadily raises and lowers its arm to bash a piece of metal with a...

 

This article argues that as manufacturing increasing becomes a digital production, more goods will be produced in the more developed countries.  If events unfold in this fashion, globalization and many other patterns with be significantly altered.  Would this make a better world?  For whom?    

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 27, 2013 9:54 AM

Seems to be that this might lead to further job loss by qualified individuals as machines are desigining and building machines and also with the advent of 3-D printing anyone at home can build a hammer as said in the article.  Also take a look at http://defdist.org/ now you can make your own 3-d gun.  Im not against gun ownership, but this opens the gate to too many people in my opinion.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:20 PM

manufacturing is becoming more and more machines rather than humans, this leaves people without jobs to support their families. It is cheaper to have a machine run the production line rather than a person. This also helps the amount of production that is completed, machines go a bit faster. But I think not every job should be a machine, there is always faulty machines but there isn't anything better than a human with common sense. 

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In China, the Web and Politics Don't Mix

In China, the Web and Politics Don't Mix | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It’s the biggest political scandal to hit China in years, and it destroys any possibility of a smooth transition to the next generation of top leaders.

 

Seth Dixon-"On April, 10th, Bo Xilai was suspended from the Central Committee and the Politburo amid allegations of his wife being suspected of murder.  This juicy gossip leads to political and social media pitfalls for the Chinese government.  One of the great paradoxes in China is the juxtaposition of it's rush towards economic prosperity through technological modernity combined with the authoritarian impulse to control the media.  For three day, the government shut down SINA, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter because the gossip was too prevalent to monitor all of the discussions.  Chinese bloggers are finding ways around the overworked censors through coded messages, that won't trip the alarm bells."


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Guns, Germs & Steel

Guns, Germs & Steel | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This video (like the book with the same title) explores the course of human history to find the geographic factors that can help to explain the global inequalities between societies. Jared Diamond’s answer lies in the military strength (guns), superior pathogens (germs) and industrial production (steel) that agricultural societies were able to develop as the critical advantages over hunter/gatherer societies. The raw materials at the disposal of the societies inhabiting particular environments partially explain the economic possibilities before them. Diamond hypothesizes that the orientations of the continents play a critical role in the relative advantages among agricultural societies (East-West orientations allow for greater diffusion of agricultural technologies than North-South orientations since the growing seasons and ecology are more compatible), giving Eurasia an advantage over Africa and the Americas. The Fertile Crescent had native plant and animal species ideal for domestication, which then diffused to Europe. Societies that have more developed animal husbandry develop a resistance to more powerful germs. Consequently, when two societies come in contact those with the best resistance to the worse diseases are more successful. Similarly, industrial production depends on an agricultural surplus since specialization requires that some workers not needing to produce their own food to work on technological innovations. Societies that had agricultural advantages were able to invest in technologies (primarily steel) that would enhance their advantages over other societies, as seen during colonization. Societies that had the best environments had access to large plant eating mammals suitable for domestication and the most productive grains would be poised to produce more dangerous guns, germs and steel—the key resources for economic dominion resulting in global inequalities.


Diamond’s critics argue that the ‘geography hypothesis’ is environmental determinism that does not properly value human choices into the equation. Still, the core of this book is the search for connections between the themes of Geography with a spatial framework and the video is available via Netflix, public libraries and many other outlets.

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Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 5:16 PM

I found this just browsing the suggestions, and I was like "Whoa! We learned this in class!" So I thought that it was really neat. 

Diamond's theory is an example of environmental determinism, because he claimed that the environment and where people lived affected the people, and that's why not everybody is equal. 

I personally agree with his theory, because it makes a lot of sense when I watched the movie/episodes.

             I believe in enviromental determinism but not to the extreme level, for example if someone is from a hot place they are lazy. I believe that people have choices and can pave their own way but the enviroment can limit them. This would for sure help future aphug students because it introduces human geography in the world history context. 

 

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Economics behind Gangnam Style

The viral hit isn't a fluke. South Korea has been cultivating a global music business for decades.


You may already know that I've been fascinating watching the cultural diffusion of Gangnam Style throughout the world as mentioned previously.  This NPR podcast looks at the economic infrastructure of the South Korean music industry that explains in greater detail how this video went viral.  The distribution of this video is dependent in part on the technological sophistication and economic strategies of South Korea to associate their brands with cultural cachet.  


Tags: popular culture, industry, diffusion, globalization, technology, economic, unit 6 industry.

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Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, March 10, 2015 7:39 PM

This NPR podcast explains the rapid diffusion of the song we all had stuck in our heads previously "Gangnam Style".  South Korea invests as much as they do in there music industry as they do with their vehicle industry.  Because their a small country and their music industry wants to be big, they have to get noticed outside there country. To make this work, music moguls in the country created hit factories, turning young singers into pop stars and sending them on tour around Asia. K Pop is now noticed all over the globe with songs like "Gangnam Style" which music video is one of the most viewed videos on YouTube.                                                                              

                                                                                                                                S.S.

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What Is Geocaching?

Learn about the high-tech treasure hunting game being played around the world by adventure seekers! Learn more at http://www.geocaching.com Subscribe to this...


Geocaching is great way to get people outdoors, use geospatial technologies and have fun with the whole family. 


Tags: GPS, edtech, geospatial, technology, location.

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:56 AM

I have tried geocaching and it really does make you use geospatial tools. You have to know exactly where you are in reference to a map, you have to know directions in which you must travel, and you know you have to reach a certain place. While a fun activity, it is also a great geographic learning tool. 

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 3:53 PM

unit 1 nature and perspectives of Geography 

This video relates to unit 1 because of its description of Geocaching, a vocab word of this unit, which is a high tech treasure hunting game where people use gps to find and identify little boxes that were hidden in the surroundings.

This relates to unit 1 because it is a defining example of globalization and helping a group of people come together in their environment. This is also an example of contagious diffusion because of the beginning spread of this invention, which spread rapidly and in an outward direction.

 

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Apple Apologizes for Its Maps Problem

Apple Apologizes for Its Maps Problem | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"We are extremely sorry," Apple CEO Tim Cook says in an open letter.


Producing a poor map can have disastrous consequences, especially if that map is widely disseminated.  Given that people rely on maps to be accurate and base decisions on spatial information, it is the mapmaker's responsibility to not go live with a map (or mapping platform) until it does meet the standards of expectation.  


Tags: mapping, technology

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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 30, 2012 8:38 PM
This image is trippy. I agree with the caption, it is only the mapmaker's responsability to not go live with a map until it meets standards. People need to know where they're going,
Nic Hardisty's comment, October 1, 2012 8:52 AM
While its terrifying that Apple would push a product that appears to be significantly flawed, it is nice to see them own their mistake and offer some solutions.
Charles Matley's comment, October 1, 2012 10:17 AM
I am glad that Apple has moved away from relying on google maps. I have not had a problem with Apple Maps domestically.
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Bounces in GPS signals reveal snow depth

Bounces in GPS signals reveal snow depth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
UNAVCO, a non-profit university-governed consortium, facilitates geoscience research and education using geodesy.


"Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research have been using what is typically considered an error in the GPS signal to measure snow depth around GPS receivers. A GPS receiver records both direct and reflected signals from a satellite. A reflected signal bounces off of whatever is around the GPS station before being recorded, and therefore can contain information about the ground surface close to the station.

Traditionally snow depth has been measured by hand. In other words, someone had to go out with a measuring stick to whatever location they were interested in.  GPS snow depth measurements solve both of these problems: once a GPS unit is installed, it can function on its own throughout the winter, and will make a measurement every two hours, which is then averaged for a daily position, or in this case, snow depth."


Tags: GPS, climatechange, water, technology,

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Create QR Codes for GPS Coordinates to Create Scavenger Hunts

Create QR Codes for GPS Coordinates to Create Scavenger Hunts | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Create QR Codes for GPS Coordinates to Create Scavenger Hunts...

 

Not everyone was access to a full class set of GPS units.  As more students have smart phone capabilities, this is just one idea on how to leverage that technology. 

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A Guide to Mass Shootings in America

A Guide to Mass Shootings in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There have been at least 57 in the last 30 years—and most of the killers got their guns legally.

 

Still not sure if I'm prepared to explain what this all means, but it would be worth discussing in class. 

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How to Fool a GPS

What if you could use GPS technology to find your misplaced keys? How about if you could use that same technology to lie about where you were in the world or...

 

We know the common usages of GPS technologies.  As the accuracy of GPS data improves, how does this expand the potenial uses?  What are the ethnics and legalities of GPS tracking devices?  Just like hackers online alter the information with rely on, this video is an introduction to the analogous GPS spoofing technology.  This TED talk is a great exploration of the future of GPS technology and privacy issues. 

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Ms. Harrington's comment, July 17, 2012 8:52 AM
The bit about neighbors tracking eachother is an example of the law not keeping up with technology and modernization. This is an interesting and complex issue that will come up again and again in the future, I am sure.
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Technology and Biological Changes

Technology and Biological Changes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A pilot study discovered that levels of BPA in pregnant Mennonite women were four times lower than the national median.

 

This is an interesting article that shows that the technological advancements and the way we choose to live has tangible, measureable effects on our biochemistry. 

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Roland's comment, July 2, 2012 11:04 AM
Everyone is already aware that organic food is better for you. There is an article I read some time ago, on a man whos name unfortunatley escapes me at the moment. In his late 50's and in fantastic shape, he only eats organic, yet goes many steps further; He eliminated all plastics from his life opting to only drink filtered water from glass containers. His entire home has a water filtration system built into it to remove exposure to toxins that you bathe in, and refuses to wear anything but natural clothing. He claims that his body is all the proof you need to know that his methods work. I'm sure any step to removing toxins in your life is one forward.
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Africa Takes Off

Africa Takes Off | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Ask this question: Which region of the world currently is the home to 6 of the 10 fastest growing economies?  Most people (myself included) would be surprised to hear that the region is sub-Saharan Africa.  While Sub-Saharan Africa is still the least economically developed region with some very significant challenges, too often Africa is only taught as a region of problems and negative patterns.  

 

Trade between Africa and the rest of the world has tripled in the last decade.  Since 2005, Africa is officially receiving more private foreign investment than official aid.  With many counties "skipping the landline phase" and going straight to cell phone technologies, the rapid acceleration of technology means that they Africa's economic infrastructure has the potential to increase quickly.      

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Maps of the Future

Maps of the Future | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A 1989 prediction about portable GPS devices was right on the money...

 

As technology continues to speed ahead, how we interact with maps will keep evolving.  This is a thoughtful blog post that spectulates about the future of mapping. 

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:20 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concepts of GIS, GPS, and mapping, because it indicates that technology will continue to play a significant role in morphing the utility and function of maps in the future.

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How tiny Estonia stepped out of USSR's shadow to become an internet titan

How tiny Estonia stepped out of USSR's shadow to become an internet titan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The European country where Skype was born made a conscious decision to embrace the web after shaking off Soviet shackles Eesti keel | Estonian language version...

 

Can you imagine walking over 100 miles without losing your internet connection?  Estonia has done it by making internet access a public service along the lines of water and electricity.  The impacts and effects or profound considering that 9 in 10 Estonians have a computerized ID card that they can use to vote, transfer money and access all the information the state has on them.  Although this may sound very dystopian and authoritarian to many, Estonians argue that it actually empowers citizens to keep the state in check.      

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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 11, 2012 11:03 PM

I actually like the idea of the computerized ID card.  Yes, undoubtedly from the outside looking in this does appear to have some big brother qualities but I think it's brilliant.  The card allows people to transfer money and vote.  It's also nice to see a country that doesn't just treat their internet use like a toy.  They use it to benefit their society, making it accessible to everyone in the country and not just those who can afford it. 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 13, 2013 10:43 AM

Just an amazing fact to see a county that was once under the controll of the USSR for so long as come so far.  Now a part of NATO and the EU Estonia has stepped out of the control of Russia to become a virbrant place to live.  Once independant and then under the contol of the USSR at the start of WW II it has once again become a nation itself.  Also notice a very different view in the article, the people there feel this electronic system lets them keep and eye on the government and not a big brother view many people in the US have over electronic ID systems.  Is it because they have always been use to being looked at by the government, ie the USSR over the last 50 years and because we are so use to freedoms that we have had for hundreds of years?

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:04 AM

I actually had no idea that Estonia birthed Skype. It was an amazing foresight that Estonia immediately jumped into the computer and internet age, and even more surprising that you can get Wi-fi across most of the country, no matter how remote. That's something that hasn't been accomplished in even the US. They had Internet in most schools by 1997 and can even vote online!

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UK 'saturated' by light pollution

UK 'saturated' by light pollution | Geography Education | Scoop.it
More than half of the UK population cannot see the stars clearly because of light pollution, campaigners say.

 

Another impact of modern technology, urbanization and living in affluent consumer-driven societies. 

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