Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Climographs

Climographs | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Climographs chart the monthly temperature and rainfall data and are a useful tool is studying climatology.  Here are links to dozens of selected United States and International cities that come from the National Drought Mitigation Center.  The image above is a climograph of Providence, RI.


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Rhode Island, statistics, visualization.

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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:15 AM

Climographs are used to show the temperature and precipitation within an area monthly. This collection of data allows us to see the climate changes that occur monthly with in an area to better understand its weather patterns.

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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."

Seth Dixon's insight:
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

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Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Blue countries are more welcoming, red countries less. Where does yours rank?
Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Economic Forum compiled a report on global tourism and part of that was an estimation of the attitude of each countries' population toward foreign visitors--this map is a visualization of that data.  Why would some particular countries be more or less welcoming? What surprises you about this map?

 

Disclaimer: according to this article, there is much that is methodologically wrong with this map. 


Tags: tourism.

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Thomas D's comment, May 6, 2013 10:29 AM
I think this map of least and most welcoming countries to tourist is very interesting. I look at this through the American point of view and see that countries like Russia, Iran and Pakistan who are among the least welcoming states. These are all countries that we have had conflicts with throughout our countries history. I also find it interesting that the United States is such a neutral country towards tourism. A country that was based off of immigrants is no longer so welcoming to outsiders coming to our country. This could be due to the recent terrorist acts that have taken place within the United States in the past 15 years. Also just by looking at the map in a broader sense most of the countries that are unwelcoming are located in western Europe and Asia rather than anywhere else in the world.
Paul Beavers's comment, July 4, 2013 7:35 PM
Well the Chinese sure hide it well. I've visited there twice (once for a month) and I couldn't have been more welcomed. The people were the best part of both visits.
Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:42 PM

cool

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Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is a primer for those that have never seen HDI data.  This interactive map with HDI data is for those already acquainted with the HDI, showing the HDI number as well as the ranking. 


Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.

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Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:38 PM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:24 AM

HDI

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Urban Areas and Income Inequality

Urban Areas and Income Inequality | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

What do these maps tell you?


Tags: statistics, census, mapping.

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Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:25 PM
The difference in incomes in this city is astronomical. Literally from one neighborhood to the next you can notice the difference.
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Rhode Island Community Profiles

Rhode Island Community Profiles | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a simplified Census data map viewer specifically for Rhode Island.  To see a simplified U.S. Census data at the national scale, see: http://sco.lt/7G5rur


Tags: statistics, Rhode Island, census, GIS, mapping, cartography.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 11:50 AM

This is a simplified Census data map viewer specifically for Rhode Island.  To see a simplified U.S. Census data at the national scale, see: http://sco.lt/7G5rur


Tags: statistics, Rhode Island, census, GIS, mapping, cartography.

Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 7:12 PM
This data really gives you a sense of the community in Rhode Island. You can find statistics on education, economic factors, health, housing and the environment. There are slightly more females than males in Rhode Island. The population pyramid shows spikes in both males and females from the ages of 15-24 and 45-54. There could be a higher population of 15-24 year olds because that age group is enrolled in school so many kids go through the public school system in Rhode Island then stay in state to go to college, trying to save some money. There’s a higher amount of 45-54 year olds because they have established themselves in this state with a job, house, family and roots so they are less likely to leave.
There is a high number of families with children under 18 in Cranston, Pawtucket, Warwick and Providence. This could be because those areas are the major cities and towns in the state so there are more families having kids in those places. There also is a high number of people in the city of Providence that speak English “not well” or “not at all”. Migrants tend to move to the cities to try to find work and cheap housing and Providence is the biggest city in Rhode Island so it is populated with many migrates who are new to English. Rhode Island has some of the highest unemployment numbers. The highest places of unemployment in Rhode Island according to this graph are East Providence, Cranston, Pawtucket, Warwick and Providence. Again this could be because those areas are some of the largest cities and towns in the state.
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Census Data Mapper

Census Data Mapper | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This web mapping application provides users with a simple interface to view, customize, save and print thematic maps of the United States, using data from the 2010 Census.  The beta version contains a set of 2010 Census data relating to age and sex, population and race, and family and housing in the United States by county or equivalent entity." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This month the U.S. Census Bureau has released the beta version of a very nice online mapping tool to display the 2010 data.  The mapper will create PDF versions of any map produced online (file sizes from 20-55KB) and the user can export the raw data to Excel.  While the user is more limited in how to display the data than they would using a GIS, this is a simple way to explore some of the basic census information.


Tags: statistics, census, GIS, mapping, cartography.


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Jen-ai's curator insight, January 24, 2013 2:11 PM

mmm data. This tool is really useful for anyone planning on servicing an area with grown food. You can see the demographics of your chosen geographical area quickly.

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At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success

At Year's End, News of a Global Health Success | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The stunning drop in global child mortality is proof that poor countries are not doomed to eternal misery. Here's how it happened.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Global health has substantially improved in the last two decades.  This article explores the improvements in global health that have been made this year, and the attached interactive feature allows users to explore the changes in global health risks.  Click here for the Guardian's version of this same data and interactive.  


Tags: medical, historical, spatial, technology, development.

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diana buja's curator insight, December 27, 2012 3:44 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

Global health has substantially improved in the last two decades.  This article explores the improvements in global health that have been made this year, and the attached interactive feature allows users to explore the changes in global health risks.  Click here for the Guardian's version of this same data and interactive.  

 

SPY PRODUCTS's comment, December 27, 2012 4:05 AM
Hi, Great to see a new list of top travel blogs. With over 8000 uniques per month, I feel mine should be in there somewhere. Could you take a look at http://www.honeymoonpackagesindia.org.in/ ? Thanks
Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, December 27, 2012 8:24 PM

Child mortality info

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White Christmas?

White Christmas? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Probability of a white Christmas in U.S.


This is not a weather report; we are still too far out to start predicting that with any accuracy.  What this map does show is the statistical probabilities of snow cover thoughout the United States for December 25th based on past climatological data.    

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Generate Simple World Maps

Generate Simple World Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Free travel tip and photos from all over the world...

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map is not a professionally produced map and that is the beauty of this website.  Virtually anyone can make a 1-feature world map by simply clicking on a checklist all the countries you want highlighted on your map.  Second, opened the file and added some text and a few lines to label it.  This took 20 minutes to make with no need for any cartographic or GIS experience  (this PNG didn't compress well, the full image of this map can be seen here).

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Expat Explorer Survey

Expat Explorer Survey | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you were moving abroad, what would you want to know? Find out the results from the largest ever global independent survey of expats. Gain a unique insight into how expat life differs across the globe.


The labor market is increasingly becoming a global market.  These countries are the leading places for expatriate workers based on economic and experience factors (according to a survey by HSBC).  You can adjust the criteria to see how these 30 countries as destinations for workers that aren't afraid to move internationally.


Tags: labor, globalization, industry, economic.

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Cactus Scientists Recommend Drinking 8 Cups Of Water Per Year

Cactus Scientists Recommend Drinking 8 Cups Of Water Per Year | Geography Education | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON—A consortium of the nation’s leading cactus doctors issued a new set of guidelines Thursday recommending that Americans drink at least 8 cups of water per year to maintain proper hydration.


This absolutely kills me.  It can be seen as a critique on the inherent bias that all scientists and authors are going to bring with them to their research.  I also see it as a reminder for a speaker/author to 'remember your audience.'

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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.

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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good introduction to basic concepts of migration;  the video is especially noteworthy because it is rich in vocabulary terms (explaining them and using global examples) necessary to teach a population geography unit. 


Tags: migration, population, statistics, unit 2 population.

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Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 2014 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 2014 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

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Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."


Seth Dixon's insight:

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.

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Women's Political Rights

Women's Political Rights | Geography Education | Scoop.it
International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is late for International Women's Day, but it is never a wrong time to analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of the expansion of women's political rights.  This interactive map is excellent for seeing these few metrics, but a more expanded dataset with maps concerning gender (in)equality in the world and the status of women is WomanStats.  


Tags: gender, mapping, statistics, political.

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Rishi Suresh's curator insight, December 5, 2013 9:04 PM

This map is interesting because it shows several rights that were historically denied women except in modern times. Based on the information on the map, most countries only gave women these rights in the 20th century, usually within the last 50 years. This is shocking because it shows just how recently women were granted rights that men have had for millenia. In fact, Saudi Arabia and the UAE still don't grant women the right to vote in the 21st century.  In the last century, we have gone to the moon, we have created weapons that can level countries, and we have planned to go to Mars, but some people still do not have the right to choose their leaders. 

Dandavikranth Reddy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:02 PM

This article is about women having their political and personal rights such as freedom from oppression, abuse, and other things. Also, this article is about how people are trying to spread women's political rights throughout the world but it is just too hard. This article is on this page because it relates to how women are struggling to get their freedom while some countries have gotten it easily. This article benefits people who are motivated to help those in dire need or support, people who will continue to stand uo for these women, and people who can start a movement to end this madness once and for all. This article is related to the book Half the sky because most of the developed countries around the world have freedom for their women, but some countries are still fighting the horrors of rape, genital mutilation, prostitution, bridal and honor killings, and many more. 

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 3:22 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the political outlook of Womens' rights across the world where the yellow is where women have the right to vote, grey is where women have the right to stand for election and black is where the first women were elected recently.

 

This map relates to unit 1 because it is an example of a reference map because of the data it shows and is a very precise version of a formal region because of its commonality between regions. It also shows a spread of hierarchical diffusion through wealthier countries

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Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Income maps of every neighborhood in the U.S. See wealth and poverty in places like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Miami, and more.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is the most user-friendly website I've seen to map economic census data.  This maps the average household income data on top of a Google Maps basemap that can be centered on any place in the United States.  This is a great resource to share with students of just about any age. 


Tags: statistics, census, GIS, mapping, K12.

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Alejandro Restrepo's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:22 PM

Very interesting aspect of our demographics here in Central Falls. Any one with an interest in demographics and the make up our city should take a look a this and compare it to other neighborhoods in Rhode Island. Knowledge is power. Empower yourself!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 2:16 PM

Can you find your neighborhood HUGGERS?

Allison Anthony's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:25 AM

Compare the neighborhoods in and around your area.  What trends do you see?  Any surprises?

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People Movin'

People Movin' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A visualization of migration flows"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great way to visualize global migration patterns.  Where are people migrating to Brazil coming from?  What countries are Brazilians migrating to?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every country.  


Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:14 AM

Es un grafic molt atractiu. Interessant per muntar treballs de grup, investigants païssos concrets

Peter Farárik's comment, February 8, 2013 9:20 AM
Perfect!
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WebGL's Digital Globe

WebGL's Digital Globe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A showcase of creative experiments programmed in JavaScript, HTML5, and WebGL
Seth Dixon's insight:

Pictured above is a still image of an interactive digital globe with population density data with colored bar graphs to symbolize the data.  This is a great open-source platform for geographic data visualization. There are not many data layers currently, but possibly there will be more in the future (best viewed in Google Chrome).  


Tagspopulation, demographics, unit 2 population, visualization, mapping.

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IGO's curator insight, January 30, 2013 5:12 AM

"Pictured above is a still image of an interactive digital globe with population density data with colored bar graphs to symbolize the data.  This is a great open-source platform for geographic data visualization. There are not many data layers currently, but possibly there will be more in the future (best viewed in Google Chrome)."

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Perception and Place

Perception and Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

50% yes, 50% no.  The raw statistics would tell you that the country is perfectly divided on this question of whether or not the University of Alabama has the greatest college football program of all time.  Not surprising to geographers, in evenly split polls, elections, or other data results, there are oftentimes strong regional factors that influence variation in the data (in this case, local allegiances, media bias and general sport fanaticism).  


Questions to Ponder:  Alabama's voting pattern is obvious, what explains for some of the other poll results from particular states?  Why is there a general East/West divide on this question?  What are the regional factors that influence the voting patterns?  Would the result be different on 6 months from now?


Tags: sport, statistics, mapping, regions.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, January 8, 2013 10:10 PM

50% yes, 50% no.  The raw statistics would tell you that the country is perfectly divided on this question of whether or not the University of Alabama has the greatest college football program of all time.  Not surprising to geographers, in evenly split polls, elections, or other data results, there are oftentimes strong regional factors that influence variation in the data (in this case, local allegiances, media bias and general sport fanaticism).  

 

Questions to Ponder:  Alabama's voting pattern is obvious, what explains for some of the other poll results from particular states?  Why is there a general East/West divide on this question?  What are the regional factors that influence the voting patterns?  Would the result be different on 6 months from now?

 

Tags: sport, statistics, mapping, regions.

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The Global Religious Landscape

The Global Religious Landscape | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A country-by-country analysis of data from more than 2,500 censuses, surveys and population registers finds that 84% of adults and children around the globe are religiously affiliated.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life is one of the best sources for information of culture and religion.  This is a great data set of global religions, complete with maps, charts and graphs.  


Tags: religion, culture, unit 3 culture.

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Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 6:51 AM

Much more than words...

Dean Haakenson's curator insight, January 7, 2013 12:05 PM

Wonderful resource for studying religion and region.

 

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, April 13, 2013 8:53 AM

...Imagine all the people living in peace? 

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Cancer's Global Footprint

Cancer's Global Footprint | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Cancer is often considered a disease of affluence, but about 70% of cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
Explore this interactive map to learn about some cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.


With this interactive map, users can explore cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.  How do these spatial distributions correlate with other developmental, consumption or economic patterns?  What surprises you about this data?   


Tags: medical, mapping, spatial.  

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:04 PM

The high rates of cancer in the United States and other wealthy countries was not surprising, the high rates of liver cancer in West Africa was. Similarly, the very high rates of liver and stomach cancer in China and Mongolia was shocking since the apparent cause is salty, pickled foods.

 

I imagine 30 years from now the rates of lung cancer will drop off a cliff for the United States, but I wonder if the same would be true for Poland which also has a very high rate of lung cancer.

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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities."


Seth Dixon's insight:

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 10:27 AM
If that's what is predicted for 2025, how populated will our world be by 2050? Scary to think about.
Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:36 PM

World cities and megacities - Presently , the mega cities of the world have to have a population of at least 10,000. Many cities are very near the minimum to be considered a mega city, but are not quite there. By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, is estimated to be home to 29 megacities.

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Exit polls 2012: How votes are shifting

Exit polls 2012: How votes are shifting | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See how much voter groups have shifted in the 2012 exit polls, compared to 2008. Early numbers are preliminary and may change significantly until midday Wednesday, when poll results are finalized.


The 2012 election mostly went as predicted (given Virginia and Florida's voting pattern, I'd invite you to re-think the "Where Does the South Begin" or at least to contextualize the political and cultural implications for the defining the vernacular region of "the South").  I'm sure we've all seen the electoral college map, but this great graphic shows the demographic groups voting patterns that produced that map. 

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UN High Commissioner for Refugees

UN High Commissioner for Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.


Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 


Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, January 22, 2013 12:20 AM

Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.