Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday?

Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Like millions of other Americans, I watch the NFL on a regular basis. However, just like millions of other viewers, most Sundays I am not sure which games will be on my television. For years, the strange geographic structures that underpinned league broadcasts were almost entirely obscured from the average consumer. People would turn on their TVs expecting to see one game only to be disappointed by another.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The top map is essentially a major market analysis of sports teams and shows to some extent the media hinterlands of America's major cities.  The second map I find even more interesting; all teams are regional, but a select few have larger national followings (if you are a fan of the Packers, Steelers, 49ers or Cowboys and are not from those areas, maybe I can guess your age).  There are many other maps in this interesting sports geography article.  What patterns do you see?  Explanations? 


Tag: sportspatialmapping, regions.

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Where U.S. Immigrants Came From

Where U.S. Immigrants Came From | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The new Pew interactive map covers 1850 to 2013."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps are produced by the Pew Research Center and show the main country of origin of each states' foreign born population.  Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the dramatically on the rise, maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a massive flow of immigrants coming from south of the border.  The reality is that percentage of foreign-born migrants in the United States from Mexico, and most Latin American countries, has steadily dropped since 2000.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mappingcensus, ethnicity.

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, October 11, 2015 2:58 PM

Une carte interactive utilisable en classe notamment en seconde.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, October 12, 2015 1:44 PM

Immigration was a major contribution to the growing population in the United States. Throughout the 1700s and 1800s the amount of immigration coming into the country was huge. The main immigrants were coming from Europe and other countries they were fleeing from because of persecution from the government or even because of the huge potato famine that occurred in the 1845-52. 1850, saw the highest amount of German immigrants and Irish immigrants were noticed throughout the map. Because of these high numbers of immigration, the United States has many cultural backgrounds that show that the country is diverse in that aspect because not one culture is the same and many people can see this within a common household.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:20 PM

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps are produced by the Pew Research Center and show the main country of origin of each states' foreign born population.  Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the dramatically on the rise, maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a massive flow of immigrants coming from south of the border.  The reality is that percentage of foreign-born migrants in the United States from Mexico, and most Latin American countries, has steadily dropped since 2000.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mapping, census, ethnicity.

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Wind Forecast

Wind Forecast | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ubercool wind animation all over the world. Wind and weather forecast for kiters, surfers, pilots and anyone else.
Seth Dixon's insight:

With people on the East Coast concerned about the possible trajectories for Hurricane Joaquin, I think it is the right time to share this interactive map.  In the past I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a mesmerizing digital globe with wind data.  This new one though, includes multiple meteorological layers with forecasts for the next two weeks...very cool.     

Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, October 19, 2015 9:45 PM

Useful for examining wind power in various areas.

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Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad?

Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As you may know, Google Maps uses the Mercator projection. So do other Web mapping services, such as Bing Maps and MapQuest. Over the years I’ve encountered antipathy toward the use of the Web Mercator from map projection people. I know of two distinct schools of opposition. One school, consisting of cartographic folks and map aficionados, thinks the Mercator projection is 'bad': The projection misrepresents relative sizes across the globe and cannot even show the poles, they are so inflated. The other school, consisting of geodesy folks, thinks mapping services have corrupted the Mercator projection, whether by using the wrong formulæ for it or by using the wrong coordinate system for it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this article you will find a thoughtful discussion of the reasons why the Mercator projection is disliked by many, but still so prevalent.  In ArcGIS online, you can Search For Groups and then enter Projected Basemaps to see many map projections on that platform. For more resources on understanding map projections, click here


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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Why GIS in Education Matters

Why GIS in Education Matters | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I have recently updated a document entitled “Why GIS in Education Matters” and have placed it online.  It represents my attempt to provide the most compelling and important reasons to teach and learn with Geographic Information Systems in a concise document that takes up no more than both sides of a single page.  While we have discussed other documents, messages, lessons, and videos in this blog over the years that are tailored to specific educational levels, needs, and content areas, this document contains the “essentials” that I have found resonate with the widest group of educators.  These essentials include critical thinking, career pathways, spatial thinking, the whys of where, asking good questions, sustainability and green technology, and mapping changes over space and time."


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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See where women outnumber men around the world (and why)

See where women outnumber men around the world (and why) | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A new study maps the population gaps between men and women around the world."


Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map is a great way to show how the 3 questions of geography make statistical analysis become more meaningful (where, why there and why care?). There are plenty of reason to care about these spatial patterns and their far-reaching implications.  


Tags: genderpopulation, mapping, regions.

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Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, September 8, 2015 4:59 PM

Its amazing how well balanced some countries are with the ratio of men to women how ever some of the 3rd world countries are off balance but not to an extreme.

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The true size of ...

The true size of ... | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This site is used to highlight the distortion issues caused by the Mercator map projection. It can be used to show the true size of countries

How it Works

1. Enter a country or state name

2. Hover over selection for size information

3. Click on selection to drag

4. Right-click on selection to delete


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective.

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The Food Capitals of Instagram

The Food Capitals of Instagram | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the popularity of some of the world’s favourite foods on Instagram. Discover Instagram’s capital of curry, which cities are big on burgers, and where pulled pork is most prolific.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I was talking to a good friend about the geographic distribution of poutine after watching the silliest YouTube video. (Montreal is famous for it's poutine, but is in equally widespread throughout Quebec?  Canada?  Is there a core/domain/sphere areas to be mapped? These are the questions that plague geographers.).  True, this map has it's limitations; Instagram hashtag data isn't normalized so the biggest cities tend to pop out more easily, access/use of Instagram isn't uniform, etc.  Still, what a great map to show some geographic applications of social media data.  This sort of map also nicely shows the spatial concepts of region, diffusion, concentration and distribution.  


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturediffusion, popular culture, regions, food.

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Paper maps still relevant even with computers, GPS

Paper maps still relevant even with computers, GPS | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The president and owner of Mapping Specialists, David Knipfer, said maps are more prevalent in society now than they’ve ever been, from turn-by-turn direction apps, to restaurant searches, to social networks that pinpoint users’ locations. Maps aren’t going away, but people are learning to use them in a different way, Knipfer said."

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Teaching APHG with Live Web Maps

Teaching APHG with Live Web Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Lyn Malone and Seth Dixon combined to present at NCGE 2015 on Saturday August 8th; the topic was Teaching AP Human Geography with Live Web Maps.


Tags: APHG, NCGEtraining, edtech, GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was glad to present in Washington D.C., and for any who could not attend, it was designed as a "first foray" into using ArcGIS online and chance to discover great web maps for every unit of APHG. 

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What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city

What it would look like if the Hiroshima bomb hit your city | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Maps bring the horror of Hiroshima home -- literally.  

Alex Wellerstein, a nuclear historian at the Stevens Institute of Technology, created a NukeMap that allows you to visualize what the Hiroshima and Nagasaki explosions would look like in your hometown. Kuang Keng Kuek Ser at Public Radio International has also developed a version, using slightly different estimates.

Here is what Little Boy, the Hiroshima bomb, would look like on Wellerstein's map if detonated in New York City."

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, August 7, 2015 11:12 AM

The NukeMap allows you to set different determinations such as bomb size, etc, as well.  

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 8, 2015 11:53 AM

Human Nature!

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:48 AM

I highly suggest tinkering around with "NukeMap," as I have spent the last 30 minutes seeing how different bombs would destroy my neighborhood and the surrounding areas- it will even adjust for varying casualty rates in areas with higher or lower populations, even just by moving the detonation site a couple of streets away. It's pretty cool at the surface, but to examine the destructive capabilities of some of these weapons is downright terrifying. You view the blast radius encompassing your home, your entire existence, on a computer screen, and its easy to forget the devastation of it all disappearing. For those who survived the atomic bombs dropped at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there was no simulation to tinker with, but instead a reality more terrible than anything I've ever had to endure in my own personal life. Thousands of lives lost, thousands more left irreversibly shattered, never to be the same again. All because men in government buildings on opposite sides of the ocean couldn't get along. No one wins in war.

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The ArcGIS Book

The ArcGIS Book | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Explore ten 'big ideas' that encapsulate the technological and social trends that have pushed geographic information systems (GIS) onto the Internet in a significant way. See how to apply these ideas to your own world. Open your eyes to what is now possible with Web GIS, and put the technology and deep data resources in your hands via the Quickstarts and Learn ArcGIS lessons that are included in each chapter."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I haven't fully previewed this online textbook yet but I am VERY optimistic about this one from the ESRI library.  You can also download the textbook as a PDF here.  There are several other online textbooks that would interest geography teachers     


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, textbook.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 22, 2015 2:13 PM

I haven't fully previewed this online textbook yet but I am VERY optimistic about this one from the ESRI library.  You can also download the textbook as a PDF here.  There are several other online textbooks that would interest geography teachers     


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, textbook.

Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:30 PM

I haven't fully previewed this online textbook yet but I am VERY optimistic about this one from the ESRI library.  You can also download the textbook as a PDF here.  There are several other online textbooks that would interest geography teachers     


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, textbook.

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Gender equity in sports

Gender equity in sports | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Yesterday the United States Women’s Soccer Team defeated Japan 5-2 in the FIFA Women’s World Cup Final in Vancouver, claiming their third world title. The event was watched by soccer fans around the country, and was called a “ratings knockout” but couldn't come close to those drawn by men’s soccer in Brazil last summer...while some states have made great strides in reducing this gender gap, others still have great inequity that needs to be addressed to effectively celebrate and give potential American female athletes the opportunities they deserve to succeed."


Tags: sport, gender, popular culture, mapping, regions, the South, culture.

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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, July 8, 2015 10:08 AM
This article talks about how not many men are interested in watching women’s sport. I think gender inequity is a major problem in general, not only in sports. Police officers are mostly men as well, as well as many high ranked jobs. We just need to keep working on it as a nation and think that the women who are being discriminated are women of our nation.
Rob Duke's comment, July 9, 2015 1:42 AM
Alex, I worked for a Chief that allowed job sharing, so that women officers who wanted to do so could share a job with both getting benefits, but only working part-time in order to have more time with family. It was a great way to improve the ratio of male to female officers.
Cultural Infusion's curator insight, August 24, 2015 10:13 PM

An important issue of our time is the gap between women and men not only in pay and workplace equality but sports and athletics also. With such a huge presence of many strong, dominate female sporting teams, the question needs to be asked, what more can we do to give these women the recognition and respect of which they deserve?

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GIS and Earth Science Week 2015

GIS and Earth Science Week 2015 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The 2015 Earth Science Week (Oct 11-17) theme is 'Visualizing Earth Systems.'   Esri’s Earth Science GeoInquiries help educators show and explore critical content in earth science."

 

Tags physical, mapping, geospatialESRI.

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Map quiz: How well do you know the American landscape?

Map quiz: How well do you know the American landscape? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Using data from the USDA, Pecirno has mapped the lower 48 states by picturing just one single subject, and nothing else – no political borders or backgrounds. The project aims to show how richly detailed single-subject maps can give people a new way to understand their landscape, Pecirno says. Can you guess what Pecirno is picturing in the minimalist maps below? To make it easier, we’ve given you a few options to choose from."


Tags: games, USA, mapping.

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Gilbert C FAURE's comment, October 5, 2015 8:17 AM
got 7/7!
John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 10:47 AM

Fun and short quiz to see how well you can think of the U.S. in a different way. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 4:12 PM

It is odd how many of these I had no idea what I was looking at. I never realized how much of the US is classified as shrub land or pine forest.

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Interactive Gnomonic Map

Interactive Gnomonic Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

As stated on USGS map projections page: "[Gnomonic maps are] used by some navigators to find the shortest path between two points.  Any straight line drawn on the map is on a great circle, but directions are true only from center point of projection."  This interactive is a very fun way  to visualize this and to understand distortion.

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Syria: Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis

Syria: Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thousands of refugees, many of them fleeing the brutal conflict in Syria, are streaming across Europe in search of safety and security.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you were hoping someone would make an interactive Story Map with 8 maps on the global refugee crisis, then this is absolutely for you.  While some of the data is centered on Syria and Europe, other maps are global in focus.  This is a VERY good example of a great web map.  


Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:29 AM

Syrian refugees

Emma Boyle's curator insight, October 2, 2015 1:58 PM

For your debate research.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 23, 2015 11:42 AM

This story map is a great visual of the current refugee crisis. This would be a helpful aid in describing the geographical barriers refugees face and how it affects them. For example the map shows where highest concentrations of deaths occur, naturally it is in the ocean. The ocean is a barrier for fleeing refugees. Think about how different landscapes and land forms can affect refugees available paths to flee

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The Geographically Uneven Coverage of Wikipedia

The Geographically Uneven Coverage of Wikipedia | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This map points out the highly uneven spatial distribution of (geotagged) Wikipedia articles in 44 language versions of the encyclopaedia. Slightly more than half of the global total of 3,336,473 articles are about places, events and people inside the red circle on the map, occupying only about 2.5% of the world’s land area.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Crowdsourcing is a powerful way to leverage modern digital sharing capabilities, but it inherently going to lead to inequities in the reporting coverage.  Why are there so many geo-tagged Wikipedia articles in Europe and not as many elsewhere?  What factors account for these discrepancies? 


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturetechnology, popular culture, Europe.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:36 AM
The Geographically Uneven Coverage of Wikipedia
David lyon's curator insight, September 23, 2015 5:00 PM
A reflection of language diversity in Europe or a Eurocentric Wikipedia?
Chris Costa's curator insight, October 7, 2015 2:56 PM

Talk about Eurocentrism. I'm a huge fan of Wikipedia for its value as an informal source of information; if I need to learn about a topic I am not familiar with, Wikipedia is a great place to get a preliminary idea of what I am learning about. It's disappointing to see the distribution of information on the site is so skewed, considering that there are so many other regions of the world with long, rich histories, than just those encompassed within the circle shown in the map. I feel like that is symptomatic of a number of issues currently plaguing western academic circles- we tend to not view the rest of the world as being important, which is not only untrue, it's both insulting and ignorant. I hope this disparity is addressed and corrected over the course of the next couple of years.

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Are solar panels right for you? Google's new mapping tool can help you decide.

Are solar panels right for you? Google's new mapping tool can help you decide. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"So it's welcome news that Google wants to make this all much, much simpler with its brand new Project Sunroof tool. Plug in your address, and Google uses its aerial imagery capabilities to help you figure out whether solar power might be a worthwhile idea. (The project is still in its early stages; here's Google's announcement from Monday.)

For now, data is only available for selected parts of the country. But let's look at a sample address given in Redwood City, California. The tool first calculates both how big the roof is and how much sun it gets per year."


Tags mapping, google.

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PSC AS Geography's curator insight, August 25, 2015 10:11 AM

A great idea to help people decide on whether to invest in solar panels - could it work in the UK too?

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 10:09 AM

Amazing mapping technologies that can help a society!

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Map Projection Transitions

Map Projection Transitions | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In some ways, all 2D maps of Earth are interrupted at some point, even if it’s just along the antimeridian at 180°. Interruptions are often in areas of less interest e.g. oceans for a land-focused map."

Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations from Jason Davies mapping project.   


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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Lilydale High School's curator insight, September 3, 2015 6:01 AM

New ways to see the world.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:33 AM

map projections

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:23 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations fromJason Davies mapping project.   

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Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos

Tourists Vs Locals: Cities Based On Where People Take Photos | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tourists and locals experience cities in strikingly different ways. To see just how different these two worlds are, have a look at the map of Washington D.C. above based on where people take photos. The red bits indicate photos taken by tourists, while the blue bits indicate photos taken by locals and the yellow bits might be either."

Seth Dixon's insight:

It amazes me how the same city can provide such diverse experiences to so many people.  Growing up in San Diego, going to the zoo was only our family's radar when company was over and they wanted to "see San Diego."  Their vision of the place, what is iconic and what is quintessentially symbolic of that place, was different from my own. 


Questions to Ponder: What are some other ways (besides local/tourist) that a place can be experienced by other groups?  How many of these 136 cities can you identify from these tourist/local patterns? 



Tagsmapping, social media, urban, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Marc Meynardi's curator insight, August 24, 2015 7:44 AM

Very interesting

 

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:32 AM

cities photos

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How Maps Are Saving the World

How Maps Are Saving the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Maps. They’ve been around longer than photographs. They’ve defined empires,guided explorers, told stories, and captured the imagination of many a hopeful traveler for years. While most appreciate the beauty and power of a good map, few recognize the dynamic and vital applications they have today.


Tags mapping, 201, edtech, cartography.

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27 Facts About Maps

A weekly show where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John shares 27 facts about maps.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Mental Floss video is an entertaining rapid-fire hodgepodge of map trivia with some important educational content nicely nestled in there.  This 99 Percent Invisible podcast is another 'ode to maps,' but this one is more poetic about the value of cartography and personal in how it explores the qualities they possess.  Enjoy them both!  

Tags mapping, trivia, cartography.

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Ashley Burleson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 4:45 AM

This Mental Floss video is an entertaining rapid-fire hodgepodge of map trivia with some important educational content nicely nestled in there.  This 99 Percent Invisible podcast is another 'ode to maps,' but this one is more poetic about the value of cartography and personal in how it explores the qualities they possess.  Enjoy them both!  

Tags:  mapping, trivia, cartography.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:43 AM

Maps are awesome - need I say more! This clip actually covers a significant amount on the power / influence of maps through history.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:59 PM

Very USA centric but entertaining and makes you think about the taken-for- granted use of maps. We do believe them!!

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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.


Tagseducation, K12geography educationspatial, mapping.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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American Curses, Mapped

American Curses, Mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Americans love to curse. The question is, which bad words are favored where? Who says “*#@&” the most? Who says “$%*#” the least? Is there a “*#$” belt? (As it turns out, yes: From New York City down to the Gulf Coast.)"


Tags: language, culturediffusion, popular culture, mapping, regions.

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you don't want to hear potty talk, this is not the set of maps on linguistic geography for you...I'm just sayin', you've been forewarned.  An isogloss is a line that separates regions that use different words for the same object/concept.  Thing of isoglosses as linguistic contour lines...are there any swearing isoglosses?  Swearing regions?     

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Jamie Strickland's comment, July 21, 2015 3:03 PM
I f-ing love this!
Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 11:00 PM

If you don't want to hear potty talk, this is not the set of maps on linguistic geography for you...I'm just sayin', you've been forewarned.  An isogloss is a line that separates regions that use different words for the same object/concept.  Thing of isoglosses as linguistic contour lines...are there any swearing isoglosses?  Swearing regions?