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What if Greece quits the euro?

What if Greece quits the euro? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A Greek exit from the euro has become a bomb fizzling at the heart of the eurozone. What could happen if it explodes?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is still all speculation, but this speculation is grounded in the very real possibility that Greece may leave the Eurozone.  This one possible scenario would have a profound ripple effect throughout the European Union and beyond.  This interactive explores each of these 8 possible results.  


Tags: Greece, Europe, supranationalism, currency, labor, economic



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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:05 PM

Money controls everything. Because parliament has to make some budget cuts, money must be spent elsewhere. Because of this, Greece leaving the euro could lead to a downward spiral including a sovereign debt crisis, a recession and political backlash. Should Greece keep the euro?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:02 AM

This article explains eight possible outcomes of Greece leaving the Euro Zone. None of them favorable for Europe, except maybe the UK which could possibly borrow more cheaply. For the rest of Europe, the results are either increased burdens for the more economically strong EZ nations like Germany, or a domino effect which accelerates the decline of the struggling economies of countries like Italy and Spain.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:09 PM

If Greek were to quit/ be forced out of the Euro, according to this article, would not bode well for the country. As the graph suggests, Greece would experience multiple consequences if their vote fail then Greece will possibly suffer a government shutdown due to the debt they find themselves in.

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Allentown- Billy Joel

Home-made music video of Billy Joel's "Allentown".
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many teachers use Billy Joel's classic song and music video Allentown as a teaching tool to introduce the topic of deindustrialization in the Rust Belt of the United States.  This alternative music video version adds some useful teaching images to help students contextualize the lyrics.  Another song to consider using is Telegraph Road by Dire Straits; the song follows a town as it industrialized and as it later deindustrialized.  


Tags: labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 4, 2013 8:26 PM

Deindustrialization and economic units

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 2:35 PM

Billy Joel's classic song and music video Allentown addresses the topic of deindustrialization in the Rust Belt of the United States.  This alternative music video version adds some images to help visualize the lyrics.  Another song that is similar is Telegraph Road by Dire Straits; the song follows a town as it industrialized and as it later deindustrialized.

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The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.


Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 

 

Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED

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Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 2:55 PM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:26 PM

The plight of Chinese workers today is incredibly great. This TED talks explains the situations many in China find themselves in the terrible conditions they must work in. While us in the west see this as unthinkable China's model for success and expansion comes at the cost of their workforce who are subjugated to poor working conditions as very low pay. The real hope for this to change is for the nation as a whole to become wealthy enough that these workers will be able to demand fair wages and work environments. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:08 PM

These workers do see their jobs as opportunities. This video is a great eye opener for people who tend to fall into the trap of looking at globalization as a system of haves and have nots. 

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Expat Explorer Survey

Expat Explorer Survey | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you were moving abroad, what would you want to know? Find out the results from the largest ever global independent survey of expats. Gain a unique insight into how expat life differs across the globe.


The labor market is increasingly becoming a global market.  These countries are the leading places for expatriate workers based on economic and experience factors (according to a survey by HSBC).  You can adjust the criteria to see how these 30 countries as destinations for workers that aren't afraid to move internationally.


Tags: labor, globalization, industry, economic.

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.



Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.


Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?


Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.

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Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 12:17 PM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 31, 2015 4:34 PM

A truly sad reality is exposed in this well-produced video.  Many of us hear about slavery still happening around us but I think most of us brush it off as little more than taboo.  To see these photos and to hear this woman's firsthand account is shocking.  If you are not instantly moved to want to help, I don't know if you're human.  This is atrocious and I only pray that one day this reality comes to an end.

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Urban Revitalization

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.

 

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today.   

2013 update: The paper plant is now officially closed  

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 12:05 PM

The Soviet Union scattered "monotowns" around their territory; these monotowns consist of a job-creating industrial institutions like factories which then allow the formation of towns around them.  They are located all around the former Soviet Union and are very isolated.  After the collapse of the Soviet Union, these towns continued to run due to the privatization of the industrial center.  Today, Russia's Lake Baikal, which is the deepest lake in the world and contains 20 percent of the Earth's fresh water, is home to one of these monotowns.  This particular town's economy is based on their paper mill which uses and deposits tons of chemicals.  Environmentalists are very concerned for the future of the lake while the citizens are only concerned with feeding their families and this is creating social unrest.  Due to the isolation and distance from Moscow, people cannot just pick up and leave.  Also, working with "cleaner" alternatives is way out of this town's budget.  Today, many citizens in these monotowns miss the support that the Soviet Union offered and people are literally stuck in a place where their only income is dirty.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:31 PM

This mill on Lake Biakal was created in the soviet era. This was created and made a increasing well place to work with the promise of a bright future for its workers. Instead when it comes to the post soviet era its a failing community. Not because of the workers but because of the era that they live in. The age of environmentalists. because of this the mill and its workers are suffering. Many of the people that had moved there to work in the mill in the 60's with a promise of a bright future. However today the people who originally moved there and the descendents are paying the price for the soviet promise. If the mill were to forever close then the people of the area would basically have no life and future. They wouldnt even have enough money to move out of look for jobs.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:28 PM

Seeing this video and the lack of human development in this small town is astounding. They are destroying a lake and the environment about them, they do not care though. Unfortunately, they have to not care about the environment, they are so desperate for work to make money to live and support themselves and family, that they are willing to do what it takes to keep their jobs at the mill. The workers and citizens of the area know about the consequences of the pollution, they know it needs to be taken care of, but with the depravity they have, they have to. They are faced with a situation no one want to be in... work and destroy the environment so they have money to live, or be without life necessities. 

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What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration?

What If Rich Countries Shut the Door on Immigration? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, warns that a backlash against immigration would wreak havoc on everything from hospitals to the high-tech industry. The interview is part of the Risk Response Network’s “What if?


This is article can be an intriguing introduction to a thought exercise geared towards understanding the economic impact of migration and the social processes that create our world. 


Questions to ponder:  Which points of the interviewee do you agree with?  Are there some that you think his analysis is off-base?  What do you think the impacts on a given location would be if there was no migration allowed? 


Tagsmigration, economic, unit 2 population, immigration, unit 6 industry, labor.

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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 

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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 8:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 1:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City

Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a bid to reconcile strict gender-segregation laws with a desire to increase employment opportunities for women, Saudi Arabia is planning to construct a new industrial "city" exclusively for female workers, Russian news agency RT reports.

 

The idea is mind-blowing to say the least.  More women would be able to be a part of the workforce and move freely about women-only cities in Saudi Arabia than they could in 'regular' cities. 

Question to ponder: would the implementation of this idea represent a cultural step forward for Saudi Arabia towards gender equality or would it be a step that further isolated women and is repressive?  What do you think of the idea given the ingrained gender norms of Saudi Arabia? 

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Kendra King's curator insight, February 27, 2015 1:09 AM

I can see how this might sound appealing, but this isn't the right solution. On the one hand, the women would be able to enter the work force more so as to close the disparity between women who are unemployed. That gap is actually huge since the article mentioned the number of Saudi women who work is somewhere in the low teens despite the fact that "60%" of college graduates are women. At the same time, this environment might prove to be more freeing for women in regards to their movement as well. As the article mentioned women always have to be "accompanied by a male," which is just ridiculously restricting.

 

Yet all of these benefits come at the price of isolation. That whole "separate, but equal" thing played out in the US and it wasn't actually equality. Nor did it actually make for a harmonious environment. In order to actually change people's minds, the government can't just push the women workers out of site in a corner.Without men being around women workers, they will continue to treat them poorly as second class citizens. Furthermore,separating them almost makes it seem like they are second class thereby exacerbating the gender norms within the country even more. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:49 AM

This women only city policy, has a lot in common with the racial segregation polices in the United States. In 1896, in Plessy v Ferguson the Supreme Court ruled that as long as the facilities for whites and blacks were equal, segregation was constitutionally permissible. The idea that facilities can be separate and equal is a fallacy. The dominate group will always be provided with the better facilities , because they have the economic and the social means to build a better facility. The less group will suffer do to a lack of political and economic means. This women only city will likely pale in comparison to the other cities of Saudi Arabia. True equality comes through integration, not separation.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:20 PM

this would 100% be a step back, that is the worst kind of segregation and "equality" did we not have this in the united states and it was scrapped shortly after because "separate is inherently not equal"

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Rhode Island Stuck at Bottom of the List: Top States For Business

Rhode Island Stuck at Bottom of the List: Top States For Business | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Ocean State didn't just place last in our overall rankings for the second year in a row, it also finished in the bottom five of four individual categories in 2012.  A  little Providence, please.

 

The business leaders and politicians in Rhode Island are working hard to attract more investment and greater job opportunities.  Rhode Island's only neighbors, Connecticut and Massachusetts attract massive amounts of venture capital compared to the Ocean State (per capita as well, so Rhode Island can't just claim that it's a matter of scale). With 11% unemployment (2nd worst in the country), the economic geography of Rhode Island has problems.  What factors have led to this economic situation?  Possible solutions?    

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 12, 2012 5:19 PM
Reading and discussing this in class I wondered after. With all the taxes Mass imposes on the residents and business owners wouldn't you expect for there to be even less of a reason to have one there. Why wouldn't owners set up in RI or in tax free NH?
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Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class.

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.

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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:47 PM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:33 PM

Its a very sad situation reading this. Seeing people go through all this to just survive. Kids don't even get any education and follow their parents footsteps to work at a plant just to be able to pay for bills. 8 dollars a day, and you wonder why they try to run to united states. Its very unfortunate that a lot of people go through this and i hope it changes soon, because to see that this is going on makes me thankful for what i have around me. Foreign investors are not great as they set out to be take advantage of the poor and get rich out of it, i think its pretty ridiculous.

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GeoFRED: Geographic Federal Reserve Economic Data

GeoFRED: Geographic Federal Reserve Economic Data | Geography Education | Scoop.it
GeoFRED is an economic data mapping tool which displays color-coded data on the state, MSA, and county levels. For example, GeoFRED can display unemployment, labor force, and population for all U.S. counties.

 

This is a great "GIS-lite" website with customizable map layers, scale references for a diverse set of economic data. 

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Hope during Economic Crisis

Flashmob en Madrid (España) organizado por el programa de radio CARNE CRUDA 2.0 Martes y jueves, 16:00, http://www.carnecruda20.es Lunes, miércoles y viernes...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have previously posted on how successful flashmobs often times use public places in a way that symbolically merges the meaning of that space with the message of the that place.  This is a fabulous example of that and I find it incredibly moving and poignant, given the recent economic woes of southern Europe.  


As Jordan Weismmann said about this flashmob in the Atlantic, "I'm not sure if this video is more heartbreaking or heartwarming, but it pretty well captures what's going on in Europe's economy right now. While the day-to-day drama of the continent's debt crisis has subsided, painful austerity measures have helped leave huge swaths of the population jobless. In Spain, unemployment is at 25 percent."   

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Trisha Klancar's curator insight, January 13, 2013 2:15 PM

We never know when we will make a difference in people's lives. Spain has undergone a very difficult time the last couple years...this is short video reminds us we all need to smile and enjoy no matter what!

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:46 PM
This video is a great example of what a difference someone can make. Before this group started playing, you could see that most of the people on that room looked down, but they certainly got some sun and happiness brought to them. It doesn't matter where in the world you are, the littlest things can certainly make a difference.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:21 PM

Flashmobs bring so much positive energy to any environment. In Madrid, this video shows how positive vibes from music are contagious and transmitted into positive energy at an unemployment office. "Here comes the Sun" is a way of saying things are going to get better, just look at the bright side. 

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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

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The Geography of a Pencil

A film from the Competitive Enterprise Institute, adapted from the 1958 essay by Leonard E. Read.



Seth Dixon's insight:

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource.

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Luke Walker's curator insight, October 5, 2014 9:12 AM

An interesting take on the pencil.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:23 AM

This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme was "Declare Your Interdependence!"  The GAW poster for 2012 focused on the Geography of a Pencil and this video works together nicely as a supplement to that poster.  You may see the economics of capitalism and globalization in a less optimistic light than Leonard Read, but the theme of interconnectedness makes this a great resource.

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Eurozone unemployment hits record high

Eurozone unemployment hits record high | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The 17-nation bloc had a jobless rate of 11.6 per cent in September, while inflation eased slightly in the last month.


Although some countries in the Eurozone have lower unemployment rates like Austria (4.4%) and Germany (5.4%), more are in the worst collective tailspin since the creation of the common currency.  Spain has the worst unemplyment rate at 25.8% of the adult population out of work.  It has taken a nasty cultural and political turn as resentments and frustrations are boiling over in the Eurozone.  Some are derisively referring to the struggling southern European countries as P.I.G.S. (Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain). 


Tags: Europe, supranationalism, currency, labor, economic

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 9, 2013 12:20 PM

A big problem in the EU.  There are countries feeling the pinch becasue of the problems of other countries.  They feel why do we have to foot the bill of so many other countries that are just failing in their own economies through their own fault.  Sounds about the same as in the US when people say why do I have to pay for others mistakes and pay more in taxes.  One is on a macro scale, one is on a micro scale. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 2015 7:48 PM

This article was interesting because unemployment is such a big topic discussed with many people today. Unemployment in the Eurozone has reached an all time high in September as their economy is falling into a recession. The highest rate was recorded in Spain where 25.8 adults are unemployed. Further layoffs are going to occur as their budget programs begin to kick in. Austria, the Netherlands, and Germany have the lowest recorded rates.

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Why leave the West for India?

Why leave the West for India? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rising numbers of people of Indian origin born in the West are moving to the country their parents left decades ago in search of opportunity and a cultural connection, reports the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan.


Since 2005, the Indian government has been encouraging people of Indian descent and former Indian nationals to return to India.  For many Indians living in the UK, there are more and better economic opportunities for them within India.   Migrants have many reasons for moving (including cultural factors), but the primary pull factor is most certainly India's ascendant importance in the global economy and rising IT industries. 

 

Tags: India, South Asia, migration, immigration, Europe, colonialism, unit 2 population

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:37 PM

As the article says, India is encouraging more people of Indian descent to return to India because of the opportunities that have become increasingly available within the country due to its  westernization . Aside from the corruption and poverty that are in India, the country has not seen any signs of these opportunities stopping.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:42 PM

With the rise in globalization and the IT industry, it is obvious that there is opportunity for success.  Many traveled to the US for economic opportunity, however many companies and IT departments are being outsourced to India, thus taking jobs away from the US.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 11, 2015 11:16 AM

This phenomenon is a direct result of the rise of the Indian economy. Before the IT industry began to set up shop in India, returning to India was economically unfeasible. The development of the Indian economy has made India an attractive place to migrate to. If you are in the IT industry, there is more opportunity for you in India, than there is in the west. Culture is obviously another major pull for Indian immigrants. Throughout history populations have always sought to return to their native land. Especially first generation immigrants, who often never fully assimilate into the culture of their new nation.

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The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation

The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Kauffman Foundation's Samuel Arbesman on his new book, The Half-Life of Facts.


This is an interview, Samuel Arbesman,the author of The Half-Life of Facts explains how population density and place matter in forming a creative economic workforce. Urban centers act as drivers of innovation and advancements and attract the more ambitious and daring workers. Additionally, this map on the expansion of the printing press (discussed in the interview) is also a great map to show how technological innovations can spur cultural diffusion.


Tags: technology, diffusion, urban, labor, migration, book review.

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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.


I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."


Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.

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Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 1:29 PM
The request video is not available ...
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Labor Day 2012

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights.  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."

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Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

Tim Stark's curator insight, October 24, 2015 9:54 PM

Great visual for economics and sociology courses

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Production in the New Global Economy

Production in the New Global Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Executives have long said America can’t compete in building electronic devices. But the migration of carmaking from Japan is a case study in the most unlikely of transformations.

 

"The iEconomy: Nissan’s Move to U.S. Offers Lessons for Tech Industry."  This is an excellent article on how the car and tech industries are changing the global economy.  Numerous foreign car companies are now investing in US; so is a Nissan produced in Tennessee a foreign car or a domestic?  The global economy is blurring many of the traditional ways in which we view production   and affecting the United States in particular. The interactive feature linked to the article provides some excellent data and resources.   This would be a great background to prepare students before taking a sample test AP Human Geography test (like Question #3 from 2011).

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Immigrants Working In America

Immigrants Working In America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. is still a nation of immigrants: One in six U.S. workers was born somewhere else. Here's where America's immigrants come from, and what they do for work.

 

Of the American immigrant population, where were the workers born?  In what industries are they employed?  These are two straight-forward graphics with the answers to those questions.    

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Kate C's comment, July 8, 2012 7:29 PM
I found the second graphic, "Field of Employment by Place of Birth", interesting because of the relevantly even distribution of employment across the board. The Latin American born population seems the be the only one that deviates from the trend, with high percentages in Agricultural and Construction fields, and the lowest numbers in Education, Health Care, & Social Services. Interesting how students are included and I wonder how accurate the Census Bureau is at measuring specific employment information for undocumented immigrants.
Macy Nossaman's curator insight, September 20, 2013 2:26 PM

This is a good article about immigrants in America because it talks about all of the different places people have immigrated from and now live and work in the U.S. Since my topic is European Immigration, It shows that there are 2.4 million Europeans currently working in the U.S.

Laurel Stelter's comment, September 27, 2013 2:23 PM
I think that this is a really interesting article. The two pictures really help define America and its workplace well. It surprised me how many people weren't born in the U.S., but still work here.
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Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S.

Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As immigration levels from Mexico have plunged, the number of new arrivals from Asia has increased.

 

Don't listen to the election year rhetoric about immigration policies if you want to understand the shifting demographic profile of immigrants entering the United States.  For years now, immigration from Latin America has been at incredibly low levels mainly from 1) limited job market in the U.S. (weakening the pull factor), 2) increased deportation (weakening the pull factor) and 3) a sharp drop in Mexican birth rates (weakening the push factor).  What other push and pull factors are influences this change in the demographic profile of migrants?   Considering that Asian migrants are more highly educated that the rest of the American population (and Hispanics have less education than the general U.S. population), how will this change the labor market within the different sectors of the economy?

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 11:46 AM
If you just listen to politicians you'd never get your facts straight. This here is a prime example of that. It can't hurt to have better educated immigrants, according to the statistics, but it may not be long before our citizens are crying out that the higher paying jobs are no longer in abundance. This could easily effect the demand for schooled and skilled job seekers, in an already damaged job market.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 12, 2012 6:14 AM
It's not even just politicians that give you false data, media outlets such as FOX news would never reveal information like this. I agree Roland, there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a better educated immigrant population.