Geography Education
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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.

Seth Dixon's insight:

What is the geography of chocolate like?  This video was produced in the Netherlands, the global center of the cocoa trade, but the world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire.  There is a dark side to chocolate production; the dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.  Although the worst of the situation is glossed over in this video, it still hints at the vast economic inequalities that are part and parcel of the global chocolate trade and the plantation roots of the production.  What are some of your reactions to this video?  


Tags: chocolate, Ivory CoastAfrica, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 6:02 PM

this is an interesting demonstration of the disconnect between the consumer and the producer. we would consider chocolate to be the product these guys are producing, yet we forget that they only deal with it at the rawest level. something we see everyday is something as rare as gold to these guys.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:12 PM

how do these people not know what the crop they are producing is or tastes like? that is amazing to me how you can be so oblivious to what you are doing. and how the place that produces cocoa does not actually have access to it.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:15 AM

What is the geography of chocolate like?  This video was produced in the Netherlands, the global center of the cocoa trade, but the world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire.  There is a dark side to chocolate production; the dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.  Although the worst of the situation is glossed over in this video, it still hints at the vast economic inequalities that are part and parcel of the global chocolate trade and the plantation roots of the production.  What are some of your reactions to this video?  


Tags: chocolate, Ivory Coast, Africa, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm

China’s hungry cattle feasting on alfalfa grown on Utah farm | Geography Education | Scoop.it
China has long depended on the U.S. breadbasket, importing up to $26 billion in U.S. agricultural products yearly. But increasingly, Chinese investors aren’t just buying from farms abroad. They’re buying the farms.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Globalization is often described as a homogenizing force, but is also pairs together odd bed fellows.  A small Utah town near the Colorado border, Jensen is now home to the largest Chinese-owned hay farm in the United States. Utah's climate is right for growing alfalfa, and China's growing cattle industry make this a natural global partnership.  Large container ships come to the United States from China, and return fairly empty, making the transportation price relatively affordable.  While this might make economic sense on a global scale, local water concerns in the west show that this isn't without it's problems.  Water resources are scarce and many see this as a depletion of local water exported to China.  Some states see this as a threat and are considering banning foreign ownership of farmland.  This article shows the merging of various geographic themes: the global and local, the industrial and the agricultural, the human and the physical.         


Tags: agriculture, agribusinesstransportation, globalizationwaterChinaindustry, economic, physical, Utah.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 2014 10:41 AM
strong>Seth Dixon's insight: China buying farm land
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:06 PM

APHG-U5

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:15 PM

APHG-U5

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'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia

'Neo-Andean' architecture sprouts in Bolivia | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Brash, baroque and steeped in native Andean symbols, the mini-mansions are a striking sight on the caked-dirt streets of El Alto, the inexorably expanding sister city of Bolivia's capital."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The pre-Columbian symbols of the condor, serpent and Tree of Life adorn the architecture of these brightly colored ballrooms that also have European-imported chandeliers, arches and other baroque elements.  The spread of globalization is often assumed to be a homogenizing cultural force, but local cultures typically take elements of the global, and make it their own.  The global becomes local and deeply rooted in place and reshapes place.


Tags globalizationarchitecture, South America, folk cultures, culture, Bolivia.

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2015 2:48 PM

Indigenous peoples across the world are beginning to take pride in their heritage once again, after being told by the forces of the imperialism in their countries, that it was not as good as European culture.  This article shows how in Bolivia, the Aymara people, a native group of the country, are rising to political, economic, and social prominence in the country.  Even the country's leader is from this group.  The architecture of this new rich class reflects native heritage but has elements of globalization.  The "castle" mentioned in the article has indoor soccer pitches (originally a European Sport) but it has so much popularity in South America, that the region is known for it today (look no further than Argentina's Lionel Messi or Brazil's Neymar).  The ballrooms also have European chandeliers, but so strong is the native influenced expressed in the houses, that they take these global factors and make them their own.  I believe this is a beneficial fact, the indigenous people across the world should be proud of their heritage and diverse backgrounds.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 11:05 AM

I should not have seen the squatters video first. I know this is a different location but its just amazing economically how you have people, mind you humans who live like the squatters just trying to survive and not because of things they did wrong after all in the other video the gentleman trying to support his family had a job in a state bank but just because they can't catch a break or the way the system is set up. In this video everything is rich and people have no worries about a roof over their head or food in their stomach. I know this happens across the world but just imagine everyone enjoying the same rich benefits and having no economic classes.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:43 PM

this is a magnificent example of a new style of architecture sprouting up almost overnight, and a style which is inspired by new ideas. its fantastic to see none traditional architecture becoming big.

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Qatar government admits almost 1,000 fatalities among migrant workers

Qatar government admits almost 1,000 fatalities among migrant workers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Report details deaths of 964 workers from Nepal, India and Bangladesh from cardiac arrests, falls and suicide
Seth Dixon's insight:

Qatar's population pyramid has a very distinct shape that you will only find in places with high migrant worker populations.  This type of demographic influx is now common in oil-rich gulf states as the forces of globalization draw in pools of labor so countries like Qatar can now 'import' the low-wage workers needed to keep their economy rolling.  The economic, cultural and political power imbalance  between the classes leads to many migrant workers being exploited, leading to the social problems listed in this article.     


Tags: Middle East, Qatar, globalization, migration, economic, labor.

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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:05 PM

Migrant workers often represent the minority group in a particular country, such as Qatar (in this example). As such, migrant workers often have little rights or worker securities that most often accompany other workers and protect their rights; however, with the current immigrant explosion in Qatar as a result of the booming oil industry, it is easy for these migrant workers to be exploited and unaccounted for. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:48 PM

While places like Qatar enjoy huge economic growth and are undertaking equally huge developments, worker exploitation has also risen. Of the nearly 1000 migrant worker deaths over a two year period, the fact that most of them were from either "sudden illnesses", falls, or suicide suggests that working conditions are abysmal. The article also outlines how the entire structure of recruiting and employing migrant workers has allowed these deaths to occur.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 2:02 PM

The death of migrant workers in Qatar has been an issue for the past decade, and the decision to appoint the nation as the host for the 2022 World Cup has only served to exacerbate the problem even more. The construction of new stadiums to host the event within the tiny nation has put an enormous burden on its migrant workers as these huge projects are underway. It is estimated that anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand workers have died in construction projects specifically related to the World Cup, and yet FIFA has continued to turn a blind eye to the project. This implied condoning of the treatment of these foreign workers in Qatar is unacceptable, and the nation should be stripped of its right to hose the World Cup. Even without the fatalities, foreign workers living in Qatar face serious discrimination at the hands of the natives, who view this impoverished (and effectively imprisoned) population as second class citizens. Such behavior should not be condoned, and it would be prudent for both FIFA and the West to intervene and either prevent said treatment of foreign workers, or to kick Qatar out of the tournament. 

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Bank has produced a report entitled "Prosperity for All."  In this, the extremely poor are defined as making less than $1.25 a day.  Two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo).  This article from the Guardian argues that development should measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements. 


Tags: poverty, development, economic, globalization, labor, NGOs.

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2014 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain

China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"China is a true mega-trader — a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade (11.5%) but also of its own GDP (47%).  The U.S. is China's top export destination. China's trade with Latin America has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest-growing corridor. China's trade is beginning to slow, however. Exports accounted for about 25% of GDP in 2012, down from 35% in 2007." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is highlights what we already know; China is a dominant force in global trade (although the map should be centered on the Pacific to show China's real shipping lanes and interregional connections).  Containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries (almost 90% of everything we buy arrives via ship).  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia. 


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Sean Goins's curator insight, November 13, 2014 1:31 PM

in the global market, china has become the rising power in the exporting market with latin america which has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest, but has also slowed down in more recent times but is still one of the largest exporters in the world

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:38 PM

A new Standard Chartered report by Madhur Jha and other Standard Chartered economists, titled "Global Trade Unbundled," highlights just how much of a trading giant China has become. "China is a true mega trader-- a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade but also of its own GDP", according to Jha. "China will likely become a champion of free trade." In 2013, China topped the United States for the first time. China's imports and exports of goods amounted to $4.16 trillion dollars. The United States is China's top destination for exports. This is obvious because if we look on half the items we use daily, they probably say "Made in China". China's exports with Latin America and Africa are still continuing to grow rapidly. Jha and others believe that China will remain the top trader mostly because the economic recovery is a positive for China. Also because a lot of attention is paid towards exports from China rather than imports. China's trade rates are likely to keep growing at a steady pace.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:17 AM

This article is highlights what we already know; China is a dominant force in global trade (although the map should be centered on the Pacific to show China's real shipping lanes and interregional connections).  Containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries (almost 90% of everything we buy arrives via ship).  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia. 


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.

Seth Dixon's insight:

In the Atlantic, there was an article that highlighted some incredible comparisons of Shanghai’s Pudong district that shows the impact of globalization.  This image is my rendering of the two images as a composite image.  Globalization has hit…hard and fast.  Today, we shouldn't think of Shanghai as a major city in China, but as as one of the major cities in the world.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  

Seth Dixon's insight:

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:17 PM

These vessels are specifically made to increase more profit and is a symbol of economic power for trades between Europe and Asia. They aim to increase containment of cargo so it is more efficient and time consuming of going back to fourth. However, they forced ports to become bigger to compete and keep up with these new inventions. These ships are getting too big and are only able to transit through the Suez canal and cannot go through the Panama. This lead to the Chinese expanding their reach to Nicaragua and building a larger canal to be able to pass through Central America.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:42 PM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.    

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM

These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Does English still borrow words from other languages?

Does English still borrow words from other languages? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"English language has 'borrowed' words for centuries. But is it now lending more than it's taking, asks Philip Durkin, deputy chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary. "


Knowledge of what is being borrowed, and from where, provides an invaluable insight into the international relations of the English language.  Today English borrows words from other languages with a truly global reach.

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Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 6:08 PM
Words of the English language were borrowed from other numerous languages. Foreign words will continue to be introduced to the language with the growth of globalization
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:51 AM

Words of the English language were borrowed from other numerous languages. Foreign words will continue to be introduced to the language with the growth of globalization

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 12, 2015 11:44 PM

Summary- This article explains how the English language is using many words from other languages. Leg, sky, take , they are all examples of these words borrowed.  In this example these languages are from the Scandinavian language. While we may not realize it, we use words from languages every single day. English is like a melting pot of mixed languages.

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one thing we study is where languages come from. Languages come from many places and ofter are similar to some, and very different from others. Many languages such as ours, "borrow" words from other languages to be in out own. This shows that the diffusion of many languages mix or overlap a little.

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Big maq attack

Big maq attack | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A 50-year-old export industry that provides millions of jobs has to reinvent itself quickly to stay competitive."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A maquiladora is a term that often used to describe a factory in Northern Mexico that enjoys special tax breaks for eport-driven production. Northern Mexico is an ideal location for this type of industry because 1) access to American markets is high and 2) labor costs are relatively low.  The Mexican Maquiladoras can no longer compete in a ‘race to the bottom’ for the lowest skill jobs, but they can produce higher-end goods and compete with China to supply more innovative consumer goods.  Labor costs in China are on the rise, making Mexico able to compete more effectively with them on the open market.  The total value of Mexican maquiladoras exports has grown by more than 50% in the last 5 years; more foreign corporations are investing money into Mexico.  Some of the more innovative and aggressive maquiladoras are attempting to become more involved in the research and development end of production; essentially they want to start competing with European and American companies on the lucrative high-end of the commodity chain instead of fighting for the scraps at the bottom. 


TagsMexicomanufacturing, industry, economic, globalization, technology.

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John Slifko's curator insight, January 13, 2014 4:02 PM

In addition to commerce what are the democratic and civil society institutions and social mvoements involved, or not involved, in this transiation now apparently underway?  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM

A maquiladora is a term that often used to describe a factory in Northern Mexico that enjoys special tax breaks for eport-driven production. Northern Mexico is an ideal location for this type of industry because 1) access to American markets is high and 2) labor costs are relatively low.  The Mexican Maquiladoras can no longer compete in a ‘race to the bottom’ for the lowest skill jobs, but they can produce higher-end goods and compete with China to supply more innovative consumer goods.  Labor costs in China are on the rise, making Mexico able to compete more effectively with them on the open market.  The total value of Mexican maquiladoras exports has grown by more than 50% in the last 5 years; more foreign corporations are investing money into Mexico.  Some of the more innovative and aggressive maquiladoras are attempting to become more involved in the research and development end of production; essentially they want to start competing with European and American companies on the lucrative high-end of the commodity chain instead of fighting for the scraps at the bottom. 


Tags: Mexico, manufacturing, industry, economic, globalization, technology.

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The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.
Seth Dixon's insight:


NPR's Planet Money has produced an 8-part series following the commodity chain of the T-Shirt.  This series explores cotton production, textile mills, sweatshops, outsourcing and in this podcast, the transportation infrastructure that moves goods globally.  This podcast touches on the same topic as one of my favorite TED talks, how containerization enabled globalization.   

 

Tagstransportation, industry, economic, globalization, technology, podcast.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 5, 2014 11:50 PM

We discussed how the container has transformed the global economy. These videos show how a simple tee shirt is made from cotton in the US, labor in Columbia, Indonesia, and Bangladesh. In the 1950s Malcolm McLean developed the first shipping container industry and transformed the global economy. Due to the fact that these containers can hold some many items, shipping goods from place to place makes manufacturing a global process. Economic geographies were completely revamped by the innovation of McLean, now a making a tee shirt connects the economies of many nations. A piece of clothing being sold in the United States now is connected to labor across the globe. 

Vicki Bedingfield's curator insight, November 5, 2015 4:54 PM

Tracking the commodity of the T-shirt from cotton to retail.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM


NPR's Planet Money has produced an 8-part series following the commodity chain of the T-Shirt.  This series explores cotton production, textile mills, sweatshops, outsourcing and in this podcast, the transportation infrastructure that moves goods globally.  This podcast touches on the same topic as one of my favorite TED talks, how containerization enabled globalization.   

 

Tags:  transportation, industry, economic, globalization, technology, podcast.


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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map from a Geography in the News article shows that Quinoa has historically been grown almost exclusively in the highlands of the Andes Mountains.  This was a localized food source for generations but this new global demand has increased the economic possibilities for Quinoa growers.  At the same time, local consumers that have traditionally depended on cheap Quinoa to supplement their diet are now effectively priced out, as stated in this Al-Jazeera article


Questions to Ponder: What modern and traditional agricultural patterns can we see in the production of Quinoa?  How have global and local forces reshaped the system?


Tags: agriculture, food production, foodglobalization, South America, folk cultures, culture, Bolivia.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 2015 10:10 PM

Quinoa appears to be originated as grain crop for edible seeds in parts of Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and along to Andes Mountain. However, they increase the crop value as it spreads to other areas of the world such as Europe and United States. One thing that I wonder is that if the production is going to be popular in any region other than South America but manufacturing regions started on eastern United States and they spread overseas to Europe. I wonder if production of Quinoa will spread to other continents. Believe it or not, it has partially spread to small parts of southwestern Europe.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:20 PM

Quinoa will be a staple for generations to come and the countries of Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina would do well to provide all the assistance to the farming community in their respective countries. This product is like New Age rice, it provides multiple benefits to health conscious consumers such as protein, fiber, and a "full" feeling when consumed. Any recipe that calls for a rice base can incorporate Quinoa just as easily and it tastes great. being a bit of a health freak, I use Quinoa in my diet and it works.

While the success of the grain has made it less accessible price-wise to those who grow it, it should provide for a greater economic benefit for years to come, lifting a population from near poverty levels to hopefully one of a strong and vibrant middle class.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:43 PM

Quinoa has been grown in the high mountains of the Andes for decades and has been a localized food for the population. As their health benefits became known in to the global community, the demands for them increases. This made it difficult for the locals to find cheap Quinoa, which is normally eaten in their diet. I feel that it is unfair for the locals to have seek new source of food alternatives now that their healthy Quinoa will become more expensive as the demand for it goes up.

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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 2010 New York Times video shows in a poignant way how the past and the present, the global and the local comibine to create underground cultural practices among the wealthy in Pakistan. 


Tags: Pakistan, popular culture, SouthAsiaglobalization, culture, Islam.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:48 PM

Alcohol bootleggers have been getting shutdown by the police force. Without this service, the bootleggers would be out of business and probably in jail. This is like prohibition in the U.S. and those who sold alcohol were fined and also arrested. The same thing is happening here where the bootleggers are trying to make huge money by selling something thats outlawed.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:36 PM

Interesting to see this happening in other areas of the world besides the United States during the times of prohibition.  If there is a will there is a way.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:57 AM

this makes sense. even in regions controlled by Muslim extremest people are people and they want their booze. this is a perfect example of the reason why you cannot punish all people of a certain group for the actions of a few.

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Nicaragua unveils major canal route

Nicaragua unveils major canal route | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Nicaraguan government and the company behind plans to build a canal linking the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean have settled on a route."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A Chinese firm (HKND) is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  I've been following this issue as I prepared to co-author an article  for Maps 101 with Julie Dixon and it is clearly a major environmental issue.  However, this issue is much more geographic than just the angle; China and Nicaragua are vying for greater control and access to the shipping lanes that dominate the global economy and international trade.  This shows that they are each attempting to bolster their regional and international impact compared to their rivals (the United States for China and Panama for Nicaragua).   


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:16 PM

This article is quite interesting... It seems as though this new canal might be good just because it will be much bigger than the current Panama Canal, allowing tankers and other large ships that cannot traverse the Panama Canal to be able to get from the Atlantic to the Pacific or vise versa. The only thing that does not sound so good about it is the fact that it may cut through Lake Nicaragua, which is the largest source of fresh water. On top of that, it claims it will not rival the Panama Canal, but to me it seems as if it would because ships would not have to travel as far south as they do now to get to the Panama Canal. Another good feature about this canal though is the canal might be able to lift Nicaragua out of Poverty and formal employment will increase because of the Canal. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:35 PM

Having a new canal that is going through the area of Nicaragua seems to be a Nicaragua and China fighting for rights to get through Central America with the US and Panama. If this were approved it could boost economic taxes between the two nations as they would be presumably argue over who is going to have the cheaper taxes. Not sure if this is a good idea or a bad one.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:15 AM

A Chinese firm (HKND) is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  I've been following this issue as I prepared to co-author an article  for Maps 101 with Julie Dixon and it is clearly a major environmental issue.  However, this issue is much more geographic than just the angle; China and Nicaragua are vying for greater control and access to the shipping lanes that dominate the global economy and international trade.  This shows that they are each attempting to bolster their regional and international impact compared to their rivals (the United States for China and Panama for Nicaragua).   


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade

"With modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the world's major settlements, thread by thread."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED-ED lesson was produced in part by an AP Human Geography teacher and the strands of geographic thought in this video are evident.  More geographers should make their own TED ED lessons; thanks for blazing the trail Shannon! 


Tags: TED, worldwide, transportation, globalization, diffusion, historical, and video.

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Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 5:09 PM
Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:51 AM

Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.

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The Ship-Breakers

The Ship-Breakers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Bangladesh men desperate for work perform one of the world’s most dangerous jobs.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal, but they aren't

designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.


Tags: Bangladesh South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:58 AM

Besides that scrap metal pollutes water and rivers, this is a health risk for humans too. I also know someone who worked at Electric Boat at the Air Base in North Kingstown who's health was also affected due to metal scraps and particles in the air. Years later after working at EB he developed lung cancer. Metal erodes away as well, especially when left sitting in salt water. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:54 AM

this is both amazing and horrifying in what these people do on a daily basis. i cannot imagine doing what these guys do everyday, and i never imagined how taking apart one of these ships would work.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:16 AM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal, but they aren't

designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.


Tags: Bangladesh,  South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Sports Movies and Globalization

Hamm said he was drawn to the true story of an agent looking for India's first pro-baseball player
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 6 minute clip is a preview of the movie "Million Dollar Arm."  It looks to be a fun movie, but what I find academically interesting about the movie is that it is a portrayal of one of the countless fascinating cultural and economic interactions that was created by globalization.  The story is about the economic forces motivating baseball scouts to seek out untapped labor pools in areas such as India that were previously not a part of baseball's cultural reach (and the really cool global lives of these individuals). 


Tags: sport, globalization, popular culture, economic, labor, India.

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Nicky Mohan's curator insight, May 5, 2014 6:31 PM

There's an absolute treasure trove of not only movies but also games that are very powerful for educational purposes. It is something that students can relate to. It is relevant & interesting.

Jyoti Chouhan's curator insight, May 13, 2014 1:45 PM

This 6 minute clip is a preview of the movie "Million Dollar Arm."  It looks to be a fun movie, but what I find academically interesting about the movie is that it is a portrayal of one of the countless fascinating cultural and economic interactions that was created by globalization.  The story is about the economic forces motivating baseball scouts to seek out untapped labor pools in areas such as India that were previously not a part of baseball's cultural reach (and the really cool global lives of these individuals).

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Tunisia's street artist

Tunisia's street artist | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Following the uprising that toppled the government in 2011, he has become a well known graffiti artist hoping to revive and modernise the ancient art of Arabic calligraphy in Tunisia. He calls his style "calligraffiti".

Seth Dixon's insight:

This short BBC video demonstrated how cultures are dynamic and are built on past traditions to confront modern circumstances.  Cultures are performed both as resistance to and wider social influences and as a mechanism to adapt to those forces.  The street art of Karim Jabbari is an excellent example of the cultural patterns and processes by blending ancient North African calligraphy with modern Western street art to create an entirely new form of cultural expression.  This cultural production is still deeply rooted in place, but in not locked away in the past either.  After the Arab Spring, Tunisians were searching for new political identities and the street festivals sponsored in part by this artist are forging new political, cultural and urban expressions.  Watch this video to see him in action, shaping a cultural landscape and strengthening a community.    

Tags: Tunisia, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, May 1, 2014 1:58 PM

Considering hip hop is a distinctly American born cultural phenomenon, this goes to show how something that was born of one nations deprived social class can leap to a nation that is very different and still put forth the same message, as well as be used in the same way. Just like in the Bronx when hip hop was just starting off it was used to get people together, in Tunisia it is being used in the same way. Graffiti itself, while seen by many as simple vandalism, can be a powerful symbol of social change. As this artist is doing, using themes from hip hop and taking old Arabic calligraphy, mixing these up and then applying them to the side of a prison which has personal as well as local symbolism - it goes to show that post Arab Spring some places are seeing real change.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:19 PM

Following the Arab Spring, Karim Jabbari is hoping to help rebuild and recreate Tunisia through his own form of cultural expression which he calls "calligraffiti".  Calligraffiti is a blend of Western Street art and North African Arabic calligraphy.  This artistic expression works to spread messages pertaining to the recreating of the social and political environment of the country and by attracting and empowering Tunisia's youth in this endeavor.  

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:24 PM

The video shows how Karim Jabbari, is able to combine folk culture (ancient arabic writing) in with the western graffiti art. He is able to use his art to express political ideals and beliefs

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Globalization and the Textile Industry

"On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, little has changed in the global sweatshop economy. Workers are again trapped and burned to death behind locked exit gates."

Seth Dixon's insight:

One of the first industries to be impacted by what is today called globalization was the textile industry and the successive waves of globalization continue to alter the geography of the textile industry.  This video shows how historical problems in the U.S. textile industry are seen today in countries such as Bangladesh, as does this interactive feature.  The following paragraph is from a Geography News Network podcast / article that Julie Dixon and I co-authored for Maps101 about the Bangladeshi garment industry:     


Many developing countries with the majority of their laborers working in agriculture welcome outsourced labor from the West. This is seen as a way to nurture industrialization, even if it is on the terms of trans-national corporations. Countless workers seek employment in textile factories simply because low pay is still an entry into the cash economy and it is one of the few jobs rural migrants can find when they first enter the big city. In such locations, Western labor, construction, and environmental standards are not priorities because the population’s basic needs haven’t been met, so the responsibility falls to the global companies—but their aim is to cut costs as much as possible to remain competitive.  From its emergence in textiles back in the late 1970’s, Bangladesh in 2013 made $19 billion in the export-oriented, ready-made garment industry, employing 4 million workers, most of whom are women. 


Listen to more of this Geography News Network podcast or read it here. 


Tags: Bangladesh, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Danielle Bellefeuille's curator insight, May 10, 2014 6:16 PM

The sad reality of the new division of labor, we are moving backwards instead of forwards with labor policies and widening the gap between core and periphery countries. We need to stand up and advocate for fair trade. These countries rely on us for sources of unemployment, and we need to give them better wages, safer working conditions, and help them push pass this dependency, and grow into more economically and socially strong countries.

 

http://www.laborrights.org

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:03 PM

The triangle shirtwaist factory in New York was a revolutionary turning point in labor regulations. Following this unfortunate event there had been many rules and laws that took effect in order to help the working people in factories and other harmful work places. The textile industry had been such an impact on globalization because this product had been so greatly treasured that countries all around the world were getting their fair share of producing a good that was in such high demand and through the use of globalization transport created an higher demand for textiles. Although, the boom of the textile industry came with the sacrifice of innocent civilians who worked endlessly just to feed their family. Regulations and legislation have to be put into effect to protect our people and our economy. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:17 AM

One of the first industries to be impacted by what is today called globalization was the textile industry and the successive waves of globalization continue to alter the geography of the textile industry.  This video shows how historical problems in the U.S. textile industry are seen today in countries such as Bangladesh, as does this interactive feature.  The following paragraph is from a Geography News Network podcast / article that Julie Dixon and I co-authored for Maps101 about the Bangladeshi garment industry:     


Many developing countries with the majority of their laborers working in agriculture welcome outsourced labor from the West. This is seen as a way to nurture industrialization, even if it is on the terms of trans-national corporations. Countless workers seek employment in textile factories simply because low pay is still an entry into the cash economy and it is one of the few jobs rural migrants can find when they first enter the big city. In such locations, Western labor, construction, and environmental standards are not priorities because the population’s basic needs haven’t been met, so the responsibility falls to the global companies—but their aim is to cut costs as much as possible to remain competitive.  From its emergence in textiles back in the late 1970’s, Bangladesh in 2013 made $19 billion in the export-oriented, ready-made garment industry, employing 4 million workers, most of whom are women. 


Listen to more of this Geography News Network podcast or read it here. 


Tags: Bangladesh, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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China's Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua

China's Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:39 PM

I remember reading that this was the original location for where the canal to connect the Pacific and Atlantic was going to be, but the technology available at the time made it impossible for the plan to be set into motion. It would be interesting to see if it can be done, as there is a variety of environmental factors at play that would make its construction complicated. I bet the venture would be very profitable for the nation's government, but I doubt that much of this work would end up helping the Nicaraguan people, and it would irreversibly alter the geographic landscape of the surrounding area. I would also be interested to see how the US would react to its construction. China is our biggest economic competitor and not an explicit ally of our's, so I wonder how comfortable the government would be with a Chinese firm exerting so much influence over a region that is very much in our own backyard. Its construction would have a number of political, economic, social, and cultural consequences, not only for Nicaragua, but for Central America and the US as well.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:30 PM

Here in this article, it is discussed why the plan to dig a canal across Nicaragua could be a very bad idea. One main concern is the fact the Wing Jang's company has no prior infrastructure construction background, where the money is coming from, the whole $40 billion. Jang denies the government will have a role in paying. There is also the environmental standpoint. A proposed route would cut through Central America's largest fresh water lake, Lake Nicaragua. The lake is a major source of drinking water and irrigation, and home to rare freshwater sharks and other fish of commercial and scientific value.There is also the possibility of Pacific sea life entering the freshwater of the lake. Economic benefits from this new canal are not even guaranteed. That is just to name a few.  Overall, it seems to me that the earth's environmental affects would outweigh the monetary economics because the potential damage that could be done is devastating to both wild life and people of the country and region.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style

Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At a new restaurant, expats find a taste of home and locals try foreign treats like fortune cookies.


Imagine living in China and missing Chinese food. It happens. American expatriates who grew up with popular takeout dishes like General Tso's chicken can't find it in China because it essentially doesn't exist here. Much of the Chinese food we grew up with isn't really Chinese. It's an American version of Chinese food. Chinese immigrants created it over time, adapting recipes with U.S. ingredients to appeal to American palates.  Now, Americans living in Shanghai can get a fix of their beloved Chinatown cuisine at a new restaurant.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This restaurant (Fortune Cookie) is just one more delicious example of how globalization impacts cultural products.  Globalization flows in many unexpected directions.  For more, see this TED talk on the search for the origins of General Tso's chicken.    


Tags: foodglobalization, culture, China, East Asia, podcast.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 11:50 AM

This is a cool article because many times we assume Chinese food is actually Chinese when it isn't. All of the food we eat that we think is Chinese is just our own American versions of it. If you go to that part of the world, that type of food isn't even found there. Now Americans living in Shanghai can go to a restaurant and experience what they would if they were living in America. American-Chinese food is very popular and to see it reach Shanghai is incredible because of how influential it has become. They faced many problems and not many people even believed that they'd stay open but their success has brought joy to the people living in that area. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:10 PM

Genius idea for these two guys to capitalize on a market that would seem to be non-existent.  I have always thought that Chinese food in America was the way it was in China.  Knowing that it is not and knowing how many Americans are in China, not to mention how much American culture has an effect in China, especially food, this is a great way to bring American culture to the East.  Like the one lady said, she felt like she was at home when she ate the meal.  The power of food is amazing.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 8:10 PM

This is the opposite of American franchises going into a foreign country. The franchises have to cater to the culture foods or go out of business. McDonalds as we see it in America serve hamburgers but in some Asian countries they serve oriental soups and must cater to their culture foods or go out of business. Here in this article its the culture of America's way of making Chinese food and bringing it into china.

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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"


Seth Dixon's insight:

Vietnam is a historically tea-drinking country, and when the French colonized, they brought coffee.  Culturally they still prefer tea, but in the 1980s, the government say this as a major export crop that they were climatically primed to produce.  This rapid growth has bolstered the economy, but has had some adverse environmental impacts as well.  The article is rich in geographic topics to bring into the classroom.

  

Tags: Vietnamagricultureglobalization, SouthEastAsia.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:20 PM

Globalization is a polarizing topic, and that is embodied very well in this article concerning the economic ascendancy of the Vietnamese economy. Globalization is responsible for the colonization of the nation, and the subsequent century of bloodshed between opposing nationalist and international forces. Global trade, however, and the introduction of coffee in Vietnam by the French, is responsible for Vietnam's current economic boost. 30 years ago, 60% of Vietnamese lived below the national poverty line; today, that number has fallen to below 10%, an extraordinary achievement. How? Vietnam has emerged as a major player in the global coffee trade, its market share rising from 0.1% to 20% in the same time period, ensuring mass employment for the first time since colonization. Is the system perfect? No- we have learned that diversified economies are integral to development, and nations too dependent on a single sector of the economy can face ruin when confronted with fluctuating market prices, supply, and global demand. There could be improvements to the existing trade, and the government could be doing even more for those who fall below the poverty line- the average Vietnamese worker still only makes a paltry $1300 annual salary- but this is a major step in the right direction. Hopefully this trend can continue, and Vietnam can continue its rise and become a fully developed nation, much like its predecessors in Asia, South Korea, China, and Japan.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 8:59 PM

Well for one thing this gives a chance for growth at the expense of others. I noticed though that the numbers stated that since the end of the war in 1975 the poverty level has decreased from 60% to 10%. But what about the possibility of corruption? environmentally there appears to be  deforestation, lots of water usage therefore future water shortage.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:29 PM
Typically I would always associate coffee and coffee beans coming from Spanish speaking countries and I would associate Asian countries with drinking tea. This threw me for a little twist, The Vietnamese do drink coffee though. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam in the 19th century by the French. A majority of their coffee beans are exported since the country needs money. After the Vietnam war had ended, their communist ally, The Soviet Union did nothing to help the crippled country. Agriculture was a disaster, bu the government decided to take a risk in the 80s with growing coffee. It was a success and kept increasing 20%-30% every year in the 90s. Now it employs over two million people. Even major brands like Nestle has coffee bean growing rights there.
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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...


Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A floating vessel that is longer than the Empire State Building is high has taken to the water for the first time.  Despite appearances, Prelude cannot strictly be described as a ship as it needs to be towed to its destination rather than travelling under its own power."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a floating testament that economies of scale will continue to push the limits.  Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America.  This is one reason why Nicaragua is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:34 PM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 8:51 PM
unit 6
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:19 AM

This is a floating testament that economies of scale will continue to push the limits.  Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America.  This is one reason why Nicaragua is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/


Seth Dixon's insight:

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce. Economies of scale infuse our transportation and communicating technologies, boosting the diffusion of countless other technologies. China's transportation infrastructure, for example has undergone some amazing physical transformations that have made their economic growth possible.  If, however, you only want to laugh at the tongue-twister of ship-shipping ships shipping shipping ships,  this is the internet meme for you


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 2:54 PM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:20 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce. Economies of scale infuse our transportation and communicating technologies, boosting the diffusion of countless other technologies. China's transportation infrastructure, for example has undergone some amazing physical transformations that have made their economic growth possible.  If, however, you only want to laugh at the tongue-twister of ship-shipping ships shipping shipping ships,  this is the internet meme for you. 


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.