Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Mother's Day Dates around the world

Mother's Day Dates around the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This map show Mother's Day celebration dates around the world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While most of the world celebrates Mother's day in May, March 21st (the vernal equinox) is day most countries in the Middle East celebrate Mother's Day.  So, why might the first day of spring be the day used to honor mothers?  Hint: think about agricultural cycles and fertility symbols.  Happy Mother's Day!

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:34 PM

Mothers Day is a holiday to celebrate mom. It doesn't matter when it is as long as its being celebrated. Though its a "made-up" holiday, its still a special one to all those moms out there.

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Women's Political Rights

Women's Political Rights | Geography Education | Scoop.it
International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is late for International Women's Day, but it is never a wrong time to analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of the expansion of women's political rights.  This interactive map is excellent for seeing these few metrics, but a more expanded dataset with maps concerning gender (in)equality in the world and the status of women is WomanStats.  


Tags: gender, mapping, statistics, political.

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Rishi Suresh's curator insight, December 5, 2013 9:04 PM

This map is interesting because it shows several rights that were historically denied women except in modern times. Based on the information on the map, most countries only gave women these rights in the 20th century, usually within the last 50 years. This is shocking because it shows just how recently women were granted rights that men have had for millenia. In fact, Saudi Arabia and the UAE still don't grant women the right to vote in the 21st century.  In the last century, we have gone to the moon, we have created weapons that can level countries, and we have planned to go to Mars, but some people still do not have the right to choose their leaders. 

Dandavikranth Reddy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:02 PM

This article is about women having their political and personal rights such as freedom from oppression, abuse, and other things. Also, this article is about how people are trying to spread women's political rights throughout the world but it is just too hard. This article is on this page because it relates to how women are struggling to get their freedom while some countries have gotten it easily. This article benefits people who are motivated to help those in dire need or support, people who will continue to stand uo for these women, and people who can start a movement to end this madness once and for all. This article is related to the book Half the sky because most of the developed countries around the world have freedom for their women, but some countries are still fighting the horrors of rape, genital mutilation, prostitution, bridal and honor killings, and many more. 

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 3:22 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the political outlook of Womens' rights across the world where the yellow is where women have the right to vote, grey is where women have the right to stand for election and black is where the first women were elected recently.

 

This map relates to unit 1 because it is an example of a reference map because of the data it shows and is a very precise version of a formal region because of its commonality between regions. It also shows a spread of hierarchical diffusion through wealthier countries

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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task
Seth Dixon's insight:

Cultural preferences for boys in China has led to a gender imbalance which has some unintended consequences, especially for the those seeking to have families with limited financial resources.


Tags: gender, China, population

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 2014 11:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 9:22 AM

The one child policy coupled with a traditionally patriarchal society has created a major problem in China in regards to men finding a wife. The preference towards having a baby boy over having a baby girl has led to abortions and infanticide in order to secure a male child. Unfortunately, this has resulted in a severely larger male population. In China's growing economically aware society, women have all the power to ultimately chose their spouse, often times considering wealth and status over any other characteristics. In a way, the power and fate of China has shifted to the women of marrying age while millions of poorer, working class men are left to live their lives unmarried and alone.  

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:42 PM

The more well off Chinese males are more apt to get with woman. Due to the gender imbalance caused by the one child policy of China, it is harder for the men who are born into less fortunate families to get married and that will cause them to lose out on love.

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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....
Seth Dixon's insight:

France is famous for trying to slow the linguistic diffusion of globalization's most powerful online language (which also happens to belong to their age-old cultural and political rival).  France has a commission dedicated to removing new words that have English origins since 1996 with the goal of introducing words with have linguistic roots in French. Recently then have done away with the Twitter term #hashtag to #mot-dièses.  This video criticizes this cultural practice and it is also derided in this NPR article.   However this does not mean that France is immune to cultural pressure to change linguistic traditions.  There was been a movement to alter the term Mademoiselle on official documents with a new title that allows women the freedom to choose the form of address that they prefer (and not to force them to reveal their marital status--think Ms. vs Miss).


Questions to Ponder: Why (and how) do languages change over time?  Is it possible to keep a language 'pure?'


Tags: language, culture, globalization, unit 3 culture, France, gender.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:21 PM

unit 3

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 16, 2015 2:52 PM

I can't say I was a fan of Ms. Burnett's reporting style. First of all, implying that America is the only country that speaks English was a little blind. Second, the little chuckles and smirks she gives is a bit condescending. She came off rather harsh and confronting of the French. And I'm sure France isn't "declaring war on English" as they are probably doing this to other languages. Finally, her last remark referencing the song "Voulez vous coucher avec moi" was a tad inappropriate in my opinion. That being said, it's understandable for a country to try and protect its language. It's part of its culture and its heritage.

 

Languages change overtime through interaction with other people. Like Ms. Burnett pointed out, there are some French words that have become common use in the everyday American conversation like a la carte and bon voyage. It is impossible to keep a language "pure" or rid of other language influences in today's society. With all the interaction happening via the web and other media outlets, people are bound to pick up words from other languages to use in their lives. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:45 AM

Frances attempts at keeping the French language pure are futile. It is impossible to stop the spread of information in a society. In the age of the internet, information is going to spread. If the internet can take down middle eastern dictators, it is going to expose French children to English words. This entire policy is a bad public relations move for the nation of France.  It makes the nation and its government seem as if they are intolerant of other cultures and views. France prides itself on being an open democratic society. An open society can not ban a language. France should reverse this policy immediately.

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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.


The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:58 PM

You can see in this woman's face that the years have been hard for her living as refugee. Although this seems like National Geographic giving themselves a pat on the back it is important to remember that this women became a national symbol for refugees and yet her life did not improve and furthermore she had no idea that her picture was so well known.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 2015 6:36 PM

I never would have imagined the "Afghan girl" being alive. It's amazing how National Geographic was able to catch up and speak with her and photograph her. This demonstrates the pure professionalism and global outreach national geographic has. 

One of the things I am most thankful about is that I do not live in a war torn society. Being separated from my family, forced to flee and become a refugee is a horrid way of life that I know I would struggle to endure. Some Afghanistan people have been doing this for over twenty years. 

One time I was having a discussion with my friend. We talking about America and the westernized part of the world. He and I agreed how lucky we were to be born in America. We were born white males in the United States of America. We could have been born a woman living in Iran or Iraq, or even as a little rural Afghan boy whom would eventually be taken and abused by theTaliban. We kept going on with different scenarios and different countries. 

Want I want for people to realize is how advanced the United States of America is. Yes, we have our problems... but non comparable to other nations. Look at nations such as Afghanistan, Iraq, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. These are first world nations which have war torn regions occupied by terrorists of all sorts. They also have little to no functioning government, although Afghanistan is improving. Even second world nations, although developing at a steady pace are plagued with an exponential amount of violent crimes and corruption. South Africa would be a prime example. 

Its amazing to read about the "Afghan girl"(s) or better yet Sharbat Gula. After all she has gone through she still has hope for her younger children. After enduring such a life of foul experiences she is still able to place all her faith into Allah and hope for the best for her children. It is also neat to see her place such a high level of importance on education. Education is the foundation for all development. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:58 AM

These two images are rather striking. They depict seventeen years in the life a young female Afghani refuge. They depict seventeen years of hell. The woman in this photograph has lived a hard life. Seventeen years probably feels like fifty years to her. On her face, you see the effects of living a life as a refugee. A life of not having a true home or place that you can count on. A life of living in deplorable refugee camps. It is the shame of the world, that people are forced to live like this. Unfortunately this women's story is an all to common occurrence in Afghanistan. Thousands have suffered similar fates in refugee camps. We must never forget the suffering of these people.

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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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The Body in Public Space

The Body in Public Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Here are some seemingly eclectic topics.  All of them center around the appropriateness of the body being displayed publicly and the cultural norms that shape how we think about the issue.  I've included a sensational restroom, public nursing, top-free protests, and of course, the Kate Middleton scandal.


Tags: culture, popular culture, gender, place, space.

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 26, 2012 10:11 AM
Hilarious! The breasts of women are human parts of a woman which should be respected because it is where a human being feeds. It is a symbol of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 30, 2012 8:07 PM
This cartoon clearly shows how breast are sexually marketed in our society and how we will can accept the fashionably sexual display of breast in public yet consider breast feeding offensive. In many ways this cartoon seems to show how some social norms seem to interfere with common sense as we should be more critical of the sexual advertisement of breast while breast feeding on the other hand should at the very least be tolerated.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:37 PM

I think the men who prohibit public breast-feeding of babies should be starved.  I have a baby cousin, whom I love dearly, and I would hate to delay his lunch as much as anyone else would hate to have their own lunches delayed.  To prohibit public-breastfeeding is cruel, discriminatory, and hypocritical, as these prohibitors were likely publicly breastfed at some point in their infant days.  A message overall about other people acting 'scandelously'- get over it.  Grow up.  I don't like having to hear from or about you, and it takes away from my definition of a perfect world when I see people starving my baby cousin.  Culture should accomodate to the entirety of the population, not a majority.  After all, as for babies- we've all been there, and as for old people- we'd be lucky to live that long, but we'll llikely be there too.  I don't think we should be governed by someone that some people elect and other people don't vote for, because it's really not fair... it would be better and a compromise to not be governed at all!  So don't be critical, be understanding... Peace and Love!

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Gendered Differences in Development

Gendered Differences in Development | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Being a woman can be much more difficult, based on where you live. 

 

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Not all Olympic champions stand on the podium

Not all Olympic champions stand on the podium | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tahmina Kohistani’s Olympics lasted exactly 14 and 42/100ths of a second.

 

This is a great article that highlights the Olympic successes that are underreported.  Due to geographic circumstances, simply competing is a remarkable accomplishment.  The women participants from Afghanistan and Iran are highlighted in this article. 

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lelapin's comment, August 11, 2012 1:27 PM
great article indeed. Thanks for turning the spotlight away from the podium, for a change.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:41 PM

The olympic games have become only about the podium winners in the media, if you dont win you dont matter. Tahmina Kohistani was the only female athlete from Afghanistan to compete in the games back in 2012. It is an amazing feat in itself that a female from Afghanistan even managed to get to the games never mind partacipate. She didnt win, she finished last, but it was her personal best time and the fastest she had ever run the 100 meter. But because she was not up on that podium none of that matter and many people did not even know she had run the race.  

Kendra King's curator insight, February 28, 2015 11:12 AM

The coverage of the Olympics after opening ceremonies is heavily centered on the medal count and I don’t actually see a problem with that. Reason being is that the story, that supposedly never got coverage, was something I remember commentators speaking about when the Afghanistan team walked out on stage during the opening ceremonies thereby showing how “politics and social culture” are intertwined. Her journey qualified her as a “champion” right away and people saw that. Secondly, when there is a ridiculous amount of events and people to cover, one needs to pick and choose. Since the point of the Olympics is to win, it isn’t surprising that the most coverage is given on the metal winners. There are stories outside of Kohistani’s in which someone who didn’t make it to podium was covered (i.e. winter Olympics regarding Ryan Bradly or Jonny Wier). Typically when that happens though, the person is from our own country. What I think is wrong with the coverage is the huge focus on just our country. While the Olympics is a time where patriotism surges as we root for our own team, it is a symptom of a large problem. Americans are too America-centric in general. Just looking at the normal daily news cover in the states is a clear indication of the issue and I think that is why some of the more analytic pieces that show “politics and social culture” are generally under reported

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Gendered Survival Guides for Kids

Gendered Survival Guides for Kids | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Many items are marketed specifically for boys or girls.  Boys are given rugged survival skills of strength, while the girl's guide suggests tips to promote better social interactions.  How is this a result of cultural patterns and processes?  How does this form of gendered marketing produce cultural patterns?   How does this create a normative society with prescribed gender roles?

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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 11, 2012 9:40 PM
This looks like an ad for kids’ adventure books from the mid 1900's conservative era. We each have our own genetic roles as males and females, but this is saying to society that girls can't do activities with the boys and vice versa.
Nicholas Rose's comment, September 13, 2012 10:09 AM
I have to agree because of the fact that males and females are different when it comes to likes and dislikes.
Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 10:03 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Gender)

     The two book covers show the social divide present between girls and boys even in today's modern culture. It implies that girls can't do as many rough adventures as boys can. The books say that girls need to worry more about their social life and boys need to worry more about their strength and toughness. 

     I think that the world can't approach any huge gender problems until they can address the problems that are present in everyday kid's lives. If kids are taught these social divides between gender as a cultural norm as young kids then they will never be able to fix the problem. Books, tshirts, and the everyday things in kids lives need to change so that they don't encourage a difference between boys and girls. Until this happens there is no chance for women and men to be equal in our world.

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Saudi women allowed into Olympics

Saudi women allowed into Olympics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Saudi Arabia is to allow its women athletes to compete in the Olympics for the first time ever, a statement by the country's London embassy says."  In what is viewed as sensitive 'baby steps' towards inclusion for women in activities most in the West take for granted, females will be competing for the Saudi Olympic team in London, something that has been forbidden until very recently.  Allowing their participation also alleviates pressure from the entire team being disqualified due to gender discrimination.  (Apparently they can ride horses - will driving automobiles be far behind?) 

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Rj Ocampo's comment, August 26, 2012 6:14 PM
I believe its amazing to see women from Saudi Arabia to compete in the Olympics. It gives them a chance to take a huge role in their society and may increase their chances of getting more rights in the future.
Audrey Williamson's comment, August 27, 2012 7:51 PM
i think it is great that Saudi Arabia is now letting women compete in the Olympics, it is a small step, but hopefully in the future it will be a gateway to much more freedom for the women.
Haley Wayland's comment, September 3, 2012 12:35 AM
I think it is amazing that Saudi Arabia allowed women to compete in the Olympics. It may just be a small step, but it may open a huge range of opportunities for the Saudi Arabia women. Hopefully, as time progresses, they will be able to have as much freedom as women here, in the United States, do.
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The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst

The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hint: India is last among the G20 and the United States didn't crack the top five in the latest survey to reflect poorly on the situation of American women.

 

A poll of 370 gender experts yielded some interesting results that reflect the local cultural, economic, political and developmental geographies.  Beyond using the lists of best and worst countries (since the rankings are still based on rather subjective criteria), students can come up with their most important factors in evaluating gender equity and evaluate the countries based on their own evaluations. 

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European women marry, give hope to Samaritans

European women marry, give hope to Samaritans | Geography Education | Scoop.it
MOUNT GERIZIM, West Bank (AP) — The Samaritans, a rapidly dwindling sect dating to biblical times, have opened their insular community to brides imported from eastern Europe in a desperate quest to preserve their ancient culture.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some folk cultures, such as the Samaritans, have historically intermarried and have been plagued by genetic diseases.  Recently, they have turned to global solutions to their local demographic woes.  "Five young women from Russia and Ukraine have moved to this hilltop village in recent years to marry local men, breathing new life into the community."  


Tagsfolk culture, gender, population, Russia, religion, culture,
Middle East


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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 12:14 PM

This article describes a how the small religious group, the Samaritans, have seen their numbers shrink to unsustainable levels and have been forced to turn outside to find wives. These men are importing brides from places like Ukraine because of a significant gender imbalance and heightened risk of birth defects due to genetic homogenization over the centuries. These circumstances present an fairly unique case of migration, one which should it become a standard practice, could have an effect on the culture of the Samaritan communities.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:43 PM

The Samaritans, a rapidly dwindling sect dating to biblical times, have opened their insular community to brides imported from eastern Europe in a desperate quest to preserve their ancient culture. Five young women from Russia and Ukraine have moved to this hilltop village in recent years to marry local men, breathing new life into the community that has been plagued by genetic diseases caused by generations of intermarriage. Husni Cohen, a 69-year-old village elder, said the marriages are not ideal, since there is always a risk that the newcomers may decide to leave. But in a community whose population has fallen to roughly 360 people, he saw little choice.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:30 PM

This is why Denmark gives plenty of incentives for women to have babies so to make sure the population growth stays above 2.06 which is the average number needed to keep a steady population.

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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I imagine I could tell you what I think about this image, but my opinion is just one man's opinion.  I'm sharing this to provoke you to have your own thoughts, feelings, perspectives and reactions to this political cartoon.  In what way(s) is your perspective a product of your cultural, historical and geographic setting?  


Tags: perspective, culture, gender

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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Super Bowl Is Largest Human Trafficking Incident In U.S.

Super Bowl Is Largest Human Trafficking Incident In U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When it came time for the Super Bowl, Clemmie Greenlee was expected to sleep with anywhere from 25 to 50 men a day.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There certainly is a dark side to large sporting events as this article on human trafficking makes perfectly clear.  The 'event economy' based on tourism (even without trafficking) also has some negative impacts.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:03 PM

This a very sad situation, I can only imagine, the torture and abuse this girls endure. This video should be play as super ball commercial, every year to bring awareness of what is going on behind closed doors. I bet they won’t play it, because we don’t like to hear about unhappy stories. Every year we get so caught up on the excitement and in our everyday life that we forget how bad other people are having it.

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A Mysterious Patch Of Light

A Mysterious Patch Of Light | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you are up in space looking down on America west of the Mississippi, one of the brightest patches of light at night is on the Great Plains in North Dakota. It's not a city, not a town, not a military installation.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This patch of light is baffled me since clusters of light on this image almost always are connected to high levels of urbanization and North Dakota has no major population center of that magnitude.  This is the Bakken formation, a new oil and gas field that is producing over 600,000 barrels a day.  The lights are oil rigs that are lit up at night, but even more because many gas flares are burning leading locals to call the area "Kuwait on the Prairie."  Oil men from far and wide are flocking to the rural, lightly populated area raising rents sky-high.  This has caused a huge localized gender imbalance, changing the demographic and cultural character of the region because of the drastic the economic and environmental shifts in the area (see the national gender balance here).  This is a great reminder that the physical and human geographies of a region are fully intermeshed one with another. 


Tags: resources, gender, environment, economic, migration.

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Heidi Zumbrun Bjerke's comment, February 12, 2013 9:52 PM
Use google earth and you can compare the two images.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's comment, February 12, 2013 11:55 PM
that's an excellent idea, especially to have students suggest what the light might be in the photo. The question is , is the bright light a one time occurrence or does it continue?J
Mary Rack's comment, February 13, 2013 6:08 AM
I'm having trouble installing GoogleEarth on my iMac. Looking forward to the comparison. Big adjustment after years in the PC world.
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Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.


This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?


Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?


The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.

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Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 2014 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 2015 8:45 PM

It would make sense for the immediate well-being of the girls for the family to just leave Pakistan. As the article mentioned, the economy is horrible for graduates (especially women) and the country lives in a dangerous military state. Yet, the family (excluding the father) continues to stay in Pakistan. I wonder, since their father is a doctor and can afford private schooling, if they stay because of the wealth advantage. As the author alluded to, girls can be more than teachers if they have the resources like Prime Minster Buhtto did. Still though, with the danger so high and better jobs available I really think there is more to the story. The explanation that makes most sense to me came from Mahrukh’s statement regarding Prime Minster Buhtto when she said, “Everyone has to go from this world, why not be famous? Why not make a name and leave your name on people’s lips.” This quote shows just how dedicated Mahrukh is to her country. It is so high that she is willing to die doing something important (provided it makes her famous).  In some ways, I find that misguided. I think the attention girls like her and Malala can bring to people who are donating to the politically broken school is of immense value. This attention wakes more people up to the issues of Pakistan and the issues of the Taliban to one day put more pressure on the nation. Yet, I know Malala doesn’t want to continue to raise awareness among the Western world her whole life. Her autobiography ends with her dreaming of returning to Pakistan. Like Mahrukh, she will die for her country too (308-311). A part deep down can see though, that for a revolution to happen the girls need to actually stay within the country. For one, the west can only interfere with the politics of another country for so long. Furthermore, I am still a legitimate believe in sovereignty despite the increasing globalization. By this I mean that it is the countries issue and it is through the pressure and convictions of the people against the government and the Taliban that will have the most impact. I hope that by staying these girls will one day have an immense impact on the social culture in Pakistan. 

 

*Yousafzai, Malala, and Christina Lamb. I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban. First ed. New York: Little, Brown, 2013. 308-311. Print.
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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...


This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 


  1. Technology-Phones mean freedom
  2. Health-Healthy communities prosper
  3. Economy-Green energy equals good business
  4. Equality-Women rule
  5. Justice-The fight for the future is now


Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   

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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 

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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 8:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 21, 2013 1:30 AM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City

Saudia Arabia To Build Women-Only City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a bid to reconcile strict gender-segregation laws with a desire to increase employment opportunities for women, Saudi Arabia is planning to construct a new industrial "city" exclusively for female workers, Russian news agency RT reports.

 

The idea is mind-blowing to say the least.  More women would be able to be a part of the workforce and move freely about women-only cities in Saudi Arabia than they could in 'regular' cities. 

Question to ponder: would the implementation of this idea represent a cultural step forward for Saudi Arabia towards gender equality or would it be a step that further isolated women and is repressive?  What do you think of the idea given the ingrained gender norms of Saudi Arabia? 

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Kendra King's curator insight, February 27, 2015 1:09 AM

I can see how this might sound appealing, but this isn't the right solution. On the one hand, the women would be able to enter the work force more so as to close the disparity between women who are unemployed. That gap is actually huge since the article mentioned the number of Saudi women who work is somewhere in the low teens despite the fact that "60%" of college graduates are women. At the same time, this environment might prove to be more freeing for women in regards to their movement as well. As the article mentioned women always have to be "accompanied by a male," which is just ridiculously restricting.

 

Yet all of these benefits come at the price of isolation. That whole "separate, but equal" thing played out in the US and it wasn't actually equality. Nor did it actually make for a harmonious environment. In order to actually change people's minds, the government can't just push the women workers out of site in a corner.Without men being around women workers, they will continue to treat them poorly as second class citizens. Furthermore,separating them almost makes it seem like they are second class thereby exacerbating the gender norms within the country even more. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:49 AM

This women only city policy, has a lot in common with the racial segregation polices in the United States. In 1896, in Plessy v Ferguson the Supreme Court ruled that as long as the facilities for whites and blacks were equal, segregation was constitutionally permissible. The idea that facilities can be separate and equal is a fallacy. The dominate group will always be provided with the better facilities , because they have the economic and the social means to build a better facility. The less group will suffer do to a lack of political and economic means. This women only city will likely pale in comparison to the other cities of Saudi Arabia. True equality comes through integration, not separation.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:20 PM

this would 100% be a step back, that is the worst kind of segregation and "equality" did we not have this in the united states and it was scrapped shortly after because "separate is inherently not equal"

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‘Why Should Boys Have All the Fun?’

‘Why Should Boys Have All the Fun?’ | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rather than focusing on how to make cities safe at any hour for citizens of both genders, the official response has been to curtail women's access to public areas deemed sensitive by authorities.

 

This is an interesting topic to use to debate urban policies and planning issues.  What leads to a safer city for women?  How does the creation of zones not safe for women impact the city long-term?  Think about scale: Is what is best for the city policy what is best for the individual? 

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Kim Vignale's comment, July 16, 2012 10:10 PM
Women in India are outraged due to the decisions the officials have made. Instead of solving the problem fairly, they are covering up the issue. Women are viewed as inferior in many developing countries. The government is enforcing the law by taking the women's freedom away; they aren't allowed in a pub after 8pm. If the law was fair and practical, officials would enforce strict laws on rape and assault and reiterate the seriousness of the crime and consequences.
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 6:57 PM

Public spaces in India are incredibly male-dominated, leading to problems with women's safety. Sexual harassment, molestation, and rape are becoming incredibly common, yet government officials refuse to address this problem. Instead of addressing the issue of male dominated spaces, officials are telling women to avoid public places. Blaming the women for the fact that they are getting attacked is a common occurrence in the world, and so far India is furthering the issue. Also, city infrastructure could be overhauled in order to light dark alleys and create larger open areas where women feel more comfortable. 

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Cultural Norms: Swimming after breast removal

Cultural Norms: Swimming after breast removal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rick Reilly tells the story of a woman's efforts to swim topless after a double mastectomy.

 

We have deeply ingrained social norms about what is and is not acceptable within public spaces.  Certain cases come along that show that these norms often treat the world as though it is black and white without varying shades of gray.  In this case, a woman who has had both of her breasts completely removed after breast cancer, discovered that conventional swimsuits physically pained her and she wanted to swim topless in a public pool.  Controversy predictably ensued.  What do you think?  Big deal?  Non-issue?  Acceptable in public or not?  Why? 

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JKingston's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:49 PM

Most relevant Additonal concepts - gender, technology

 

Relevant Year 12  Topics

Continuity & Change

Continuity & Change Syllabus continuity and change 1 - modernisation 2 - sustainability 3 - tradition 4 - beliefs and values 5 - empowerment 6 - westernisation 7 - cooperation and conflict Contemporary Context The following points are to be integrated across the study of Social and Cultural Continuity and Change: 8 - use examples drawn from contemporary society 9 - examine the impact of technologies, including communication technologies, on continuity and change 10 - apply a social theory to a selected country and assess its ability to explain both continuity and change 11 - assess the role and value of social and cultural research in the examination of contemporary societies and cultures. Students develop knowledge and understanding of research methods by examining: 12 - the features of primary and secondary research 13 - the nature and characteristics of quantitative and qualitative research 14 - the characteristics, strengths and weaknesses of the following research methods: 15 - case study 16 - focus group 17 - observation 18 - personal reflection 19 - secondary research 20 - content analysis 21 -interview 22 - participant observation 23 - questionnaire 24 -statistical analysis. The nature of social and cultural continuity and change Students develop knowledge and understanding of social and cultural continuity and change by examining: 25 - the nature of continuity and change: 26 - change is a complex process 27 - 'evolutionary’ change 28 - ‘transformative’ change 29 - resistance to change 30 - the influence that continuity and change have on the development of society at the micro, meso and macro levels 31 - the impact of modernisation and westernisation on social and cultural continuity and change 32 - theories of social change as attempts to explain change, and resistance to change, within societies and cultures in relation to: 33 - structural changes within society 34 - the processes and agents of social change 35 - the directions of change 36 - key features of each of the following theories: 37 - conflict 38 - evolutionary 38 - functionalist 39 - interactionist. Students will study in detail a country in order to: 40 - determine the nature of traditional society and culture 41 - analyse the nature of power and authority 42 - examine the impact of continuity and change upon the lives of individuals and groups in the micro, meso and macro levels of society. Students will explore BOTH continuity AND change in the selected country through a detailed study of ONE of the following aspects: 43 - beliefs, values and lifestyles 44 - education 45 - family life and population changes 46 - gender roles and the status of men and women 47 - the legal system and political processes. In relation to the selected country, students will examine: 48 - Is all change necessarily progress? 49 - Which groups benefit from change? Which do not? 50 - How has access to technologies impacted on the rate and direction of change? Choose ONE social theory from the list below and apply it to the selected country: 51 - conflict 52 - evolutionary 53 - functionalist 54 - interactionist. 55 -Assess the appropriateness of this social theory in explaining continuity and change for the selected country. The near future (5 to 10 years) Students are to: 56 - determine current trends and suggest probable future directions for the aspect of the country studied in the focus study 57 - evaluate the impact and implications for the aspect of the country studied of: 58 - likely changes 59 - probable continuities 60 - predict the importance of technologies to the country studied.


Belief systems


Topic Specific Concepts 1 - values 2 - beliefs 3 - symbols 4 - customs 5 - worldview 6 - ritual 7 - philosophy 8 - secularisation 9 -institutional power Contemporary Context The following points are to be integrated across the study of Belief Systems and Ideologies: 10 - use examples drawn from contemporary society 11 -assess the impact of technologies, including communication technologies, on the belief system or ideology 12 - examine a contemporary issue in a belief system or ideology using the research method of interview. The nature of belief systems and ideologies Students develop an understanding of the nature of belief systems and ideologies by examining: 13 - the similarities and differences between belief systems and ideologies 14 - the nature and role of shared values and understanding within belief systems and ideologies and how this creates meaning, purpose and an identity for individuals and groups 15 - how belief systems and ideologies express values and beliefs and ways of perceiving the world at the micro, meso and macro levels 16 - the nature and role of hierarchy and internal power structures within belief systems and ideologies 17 - the process of secularisation in the development and extent of belief systems and ideologies within Australia. Focus study Students are to develop knowledge and understanding of either one belief system OR one ideology that demonstrates a set of values and beliefs and a relationship to the wider society and culture by examining: 18 -the philosophy of the belief system or ideology: 19 - the relationship between its historical development and its underlying principles 20 - the beliefs and values expressed and the impact on personal and collective identity 21 - the nature and extent of adherents in the world today 22 - traditions and culture in the belief system or ideology: 23 - important places, texts and unique language and their significance 24 - the role of symbols, rituals and customs 25 - the importance of myths and stories 26 -how the belief system or ideology defines gender and gender roles 27 - the internal structure in the belief system or ideology: 28 - the role of important people and power structures 29 - the role and impact of dissent 30 - the nature and impact of change and resistance to change 31- the impact of technologies and globalisation on continuity and change 32 - the relationship of the belief system or ideology to wider society: 33 - acceptance and rejection of the philosophy at the micro, meso and macro levels 34 - the relationship of the belief system or ideology to ethical issues in society 35 the relationship of the belief system or ideology to peace and conflict in the world. The near future ( 5 to 10 yrs) Students are to determine current trends and suggest probable future directions for the belief system or ideology 36 - evaluate the impact and implications for the belief system or ideology of: 37 - likely changes 38 - probable continuities 39 - predict the importance of the belief system or ideology to society in the near future.

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The Geographic Impacts of Fathers

The Geographic Impacts of Fathers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The social-science evidence is in: though it may benefit the adults involved, the dissolution of intact two-parent families is harmful to large numbers of children."

 

On this Father's Day, I'm thinking about the sociological importance of fathers and my gratitude for my father (an educator who instilled in me the desire to teach).  Although this article is quite dated and was politically charged with a controversial title at the time, "Dan Quayle was Right," many of the main points still hold today.  The article points to solid social science evidence as to the importance of fathers within society.  Conversely, fatherlessness also has major (negative) impacts society as well.  

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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 13, 2012 9:51 PM
Culture and location may play a greater role in this issue than the article suggest as urbanized societies tend to high a higher divorce rate than rural ones. Education, living standard and opportunity are not distributed equally in this country (or anywhere else) and to make the argument that increased broken families and the loaded “lack of values” theory is the main cause behind raising social problems can be a bit misleading, as it excludes environmental factors. However, I do agree that fathers can have a positive impact on their childs development.