Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Tips for the Google Maps Guessing Game

Tips for the Google Maps Guessing Game | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

In this interview with Rosemary Wardley (senior GIS cartographer at National Geographic Maps) she offers tips on how to evaluate the landscape to do well on the game, GeoGuessr.  If you haven't played GeoGuessr, you've got to try it out.  It displays 5 locations in GoogleMaps StreetView and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It's a fantastic exploration exercise.   


Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

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Nicholas Pringle's curator insight, June 3, 2013 7:44 AM

This has great potential for a education geography tool. Very creative!

fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 9:00 AM
hshahda´~
Todd Parsons's curator insight, October 28, 2013 5:41 PM

Say goodbye to getting anything done...

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Geography Bee Video

What is a border? What is a peninsula? A look into why geography is important to understand as students around the country prepare for the 2013 National Geog...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I loved participating at the Rhode Island Geography Bee this weekend.  This video was shared with all the parents, teachers and students to help them understand that while the Bee may focus on specific bits of knowledge/trivia, it is the beginning and a foundation for spatial thinking to understand patterns and processes. 


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, April 8, 2013 6:58 PM

This is a short video about why Geography is an important subject inhelping to understand the world in which we live.

Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:37 AM

Q1) Based on the information in this video, would you consider Geography as a broad subject and why?

Q2) Why do you believe that Geography is important? (Using examples from the video and your own opinion)

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The Geography of Afghanistan

The Geography of Afghanistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Students are introduced to the physical and human features of Afghanistan."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This tremendous set of resources is the result of a partnership between The Choices Program (housed at Brown University) and National Geographic Education.  This link takes you to a portal with lesson plans, videos, maps, student worksheets, etc.  These are some of the materials that form the core of the Choices Program Summer Institute that focuses on the United States' involvement in Afghanistan.  


Tags: Afghanistan, politicalculture, Central Asia, National Geographic.

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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 2015 6:04 PM

Afghanistan is a unique country that is plagued by the media as war torn and savage. Not much about Afghanistan cultural geography and how ordinary Afghan people function is represented by mainstream news organizations and other forms of western media. Its a shame. 

Afghanistan is a mountainous country thus creating four distinct regions that have more or less there own identity. This has been seen throughout history. Geography can keep a nation separated culturally and tougher to govern on a political scale as well. This is especially present in lesser develop nations. For example Ancient Greece was tough to keep politically sound due to its nonstop Mountains. This makes communication difficult, especially in a timely fashion. It also keeps people separate from each other leading people to create there own culture. Italy is another example in regards to the Industrial North being an extreme opposite of the agricultural south. The Northern Italian geography was heavily influenced by other European industrial nations while the agrarian south remained simple. These two separate identities have been present for some time and have continued to produce conflict since the forming of the Country Italy in the late 19th century. None the less, Afghanistan is another example of geography separating a country. However the geography also gives birth to different styles of living.

People in rural Afghanistan still practice pastoralism. The movement of livestock by changing of seasons is complemented by farmers growing of crops such as barley, nuts, wheat, and fruit, just to name a few. These people mostly live off of what they produce. Within the past decade Afghanistan has undergone a process of urbanization. I argue its due to westernization of the potential/growth of a Central Business District. The respected main cities in the four different regions, especially Kabul have seen a huge population growth. This is due to cities offering education and economic mobility. The standard of living is higher and attracts people from rural areas. I can imagine it is attracting relatively young people ranging from 15 to 30 years of age whom are seeking a different way of life.

The cities rely on the rural regions for certain supplies of food and the rural regions rely of manufactured goods. Its nice to see Afghanistan pastoralists not  being luddites and excepting technology as a positive force.

My perception on Afghanistan is that its a first world country. However it is starting to form the foundation for lifting itself from first world to second world. Afghanistan has a new government (western influenced), which is essential in developing a nation. However there are signs of corruption. If able to establish a more sound country, it can begin to build its economy from within and spread outward. With becoming more politically and economically developed Afghanistan would become a second world nation. Afghanistan has a lot to go through before it can be considered second world. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 4, 2015 11:27 PM

Once I opened this portal I was amazed with how many resources were available, having worksheets, maps, lesson plans and videos really can help a teacher to get more in depth while teaching about Afghanistan. Having the opportunity to let the children watch video's can really help the visual learners in the classroom and well s the auditory learners. The lesson plan talks about the history and people in Afghanistan as well as maps that help trace out ethnicities in the region.The video on daily life would really help show the children how different their lives are from those in Afghanistan, to create an assignment from the video the children could do a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the lives of the average United States citizen and the daily life of someone living in Afghanistan.

Every area in the world has a different geography  and I believe it is important for everyone whether it be students or adults, everyone should learn about each region to get an understanding of how other people are living in the world around us.

As a history, social studies or geography teacher I would come back to this lesson plan and enlighten my children using the Common Core Standards so when they venture out in the world they have a grasp of what is going on around them.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:52 PM

From this, I learned that the borders are shaped for Russia and British India to have uncommon borders. Having friendly ties with Pakistan has a lot to do with the Soviet presence with in Central Asia. It is predominantly agrigul society. 20% live in urban areas and 80% live in rural areas. Urban spaces tend to be more modernized with water and electricity.  Those in the rural areas have had no running water and have been living their lives without and in a way in which we would not be used to. People in rural areas cook on open fire, life for women is very labor intensive, so it is good for big families because then the children can help, both in and out the house. 

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#deextinction

Seth Dixon's insight:

De-extinction is a new term for to me but this week a TEDx conference hosted by National Geographic focused completely on this concept on the possibility of reviving formerly extinct species. Just because we think we can bring back a lost species, does that mean we should?  What would be the benefits?  Disadvantages? 


I've read enough about passenger pigeons to know that beyond overhunting, the species went extinct as large swaths of North American forests became fragmented and modified.  While we may be able to theoretically bring back a species, we cannot rewind the clock and bring all the essential ingredients to their former ecosystem that allowed them to thrive in the first place.  De-extinction would NOT be repairing the world so that it was as if the extinction never happened, since other species in the ecosystem have adapted to their absence. Given the length of their absence, could these be considered "invasive species?"     


Tags: biogeography, environment, National Geographic, environment modify, ecology, historical, TED.

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At National Geographic Headquarters

Seth Dixon's insight:

Today I've been at the the National Geographic headquarters in Washington D.C. with other Geography Education Alliance coordinators.  They have the coolest toys to capture some amazing footage, including crittercams.  

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Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, March 7, 2013 10:54 AM

Seen one of these used on mt washington to get aerial footage of people on the summit.

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Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 6-minute video clip is a good way to help students understand the ethnic and geopolitical context of the Mali conflict.  What impact did the superimposed borders of colonialism have in creating the conflict? 


Tags: Mali, Africa, borders, political, conflict, war, colonialism, National Geographic.

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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 6, 2013 6:37 AM

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 12:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
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2012 National Geographic Photography Contest Winners

2012 National Geographic Photography Contest Winners | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The winners have been named in the 2012 National Geographic Photography contest. As a leader in capturing the world through brilliant imagery, National Geographic sets the standard for photographic excellence.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This image of the Matterhorn was the 1st place winner in the "places" category in the National Geographic's 2012 competition.  The winners are just as impressive as you would expect coming from National Geographic.

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The School Aranda's curator insight, January 9, 2013 4:50 AM

This image of the Matterhorn was the 1st place winner in the "places" category in the National Geographic's 2012 competition.  The winners are just as impressive as you would expect coming from National Geographic.


Wow....these should prove very useful for K, T and A classes.

Michal Zachar's curator insight, January 9, 2013 8:57 AM

This image of the Matterhorn was the 1st place winner in the "places" category in the National Geographic's 2012 competition.  The winners are just as impressive as you would expect coming from National Geographic.

Webdesigners's curator insight, January 10, 2013 6:51 AM

Best website design company Chennai, Logo designing Chennai, Web design Chennai

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NatGeo's APHG page

NatGeo's APHG page | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Resources from National Geographic Education to support teachers and learners of the Advanced Placement Human Geography course.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The National Geographic Education Foundation works to assist teachers to promote the status and quality of geography education.  In keeping with that mission they have recently revamped their AP Human Geography page, dividing all their resources according to the 7 major units of the course (in the "tags" section below, I have attempted to do the same):

  1. Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives
  2. Population
  3. Cultural Patterns and Processes
  4. Political Organization of Space
  5. Agriculture and Rural Land Use
  6. Industrialization and Economic Development
  7. Cities and Urban Land Use

Tags: APHG, unit 1, unit 2, unit 3, unit 4, unit 5, unit 6, unit 7.

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Steven Sutantro's curator insight, December 20, 2012 8:31 PM

Useful tools for Geography Educators

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 26, 2012 6:49 AM

It's Worth knowing about it!

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Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.


This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?


Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.

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NatGeo on Instagram

NatGeo on Instagram | Geography Education | Scoop.it

I'm not a photographer, so Instagram isn't one on of my preferred social media platforms.  However, since National Geographic is world renowned for their images, this is a perfect outlet to share more images that wouldn't fit into their articles or other collections.  According to their Social Media expert, this foggy image of NYC is their most viewed image on Instagram. 

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Make your own Mega Map

Make your own Mega Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I love National Geographic’s MapMaker Kit as a great way to have students produce their own oversized Mega Maps  (8 rows of 17 columns), especially if you only have access to a printer that p...


Here are 6 lessons and activities designed around National Geographic’s Mega Maps and Tabletop Maps that can be printed with ordinary 8.5 x11 sheets of paper.  This is a perfect way to celebrate and get ready for the upcoming Geography Awareness Week (Nov . 11-17). 


Tags: mapping, K12, National Geographic, Geography Education

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United States MapMaker Kit

United States MapMaker Kit | Geography Education | Scoop.it
MapMaker Kit. Download, print, and assemble maps of the United States in a variety of sizes. The mega map occupies a large wall, or can be used on the floor.


Have you every wanted to create a giant map but aren't sure if you can logistically pull it off?  The National Geographic's MapMaker kit is just that, a kit for you to create wall maps from a standard printer and tile them together.  The assembly itself is a great spatial thinking and fun exercise for students (and there are large world maps as well). 


Tags: NationalGeographic, cartography, mapping, K12.

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Arezza Network's comment, October 19, 2012 9:20 AM
#Geography is key to shaping the #culture of a community
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Selecting a Map Projection

Selecting a Map Projection | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Video. Cartographers at National Geographic discuss how they select an appropriate map projection for the September 2012 magazine map supplement.


There is no one perfect map projection that fits all circumstances and situations. Think of a situation in which this map projection would be an ideal way to represent the Earth and in another situation that same projection would give you an incredibly limited perspective. 


Tags: cartography, K12, geospatial, NationalGeographic, water

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6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You

6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From the food we eat to the energy, transportation, and water we all need, a warmer world will bring big changes for everyone.

 

B Sinica: This article touches every aspect of geography from culture to climate [considering] how the growing population plays the biggest role in determining the future of life on Earth.  People need to recognize the problems and potential future issues with global warming and the rapidly changing environment.  Though not many issues can be prevented or even solved, the least we can do is try to lessen the severity of devastation and prolong the current conditions as much as possible before the world becomes too extreme to manage.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some tangible ways that climate change can impact us in the future:

  • Food Security
  • Energy consumption
  • Extreme Weather
  • Drought
  • Health risks (more air-born diseases)
  • Vulnerable urban ecologies


Tags: climate change, environment, environment adapt, sustainability. National Geographic.

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Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:22 PM
It is kind of a scary thought that global warming could greatly disrupt the way we live. Everyone is affected by it especially businesses like farms. The production of crops declines because of the excessive heat. Changing climate affect the length of each season which hurts the process of growing and harvesting crops. There would also be a change in the production, storage and transportation. It will cost more money to properly manage these businesses. This change will not only affect companies and how we handle our food but also our way of life and health. We would all have to adapt to such drastic changes in the environment which may be a struggle for some. Health wise, if it is too hot and people are not well adapted then it could lead to hospitalization and increased health risks. I don’t think there is much we can do to lessen the severity because it is a natural cycle of earth. I do think we may have sped up the process a little bit, for example car exhaustion and greenhouse gasses. But we are so dependent on such technology we can’t just make it disappear.
Dillon Cartwright's comment, May 3, 2013 4:04 PM
It's crazy that something like a little climate change can change the affect the entire world. Not just in one way either, it affects the world in many ways, like the 6 mentioned above. I don't think people realize the frailty of the environment they live in. Something as small as someones car exhaust becomes kind of a big deal when there are hundreds of millions of cars in the world.
In addition to that, I think it's great that life expectancy has gone up with cures to diseases and advances in modern medicine. It's a good thing that people are living longer lives, but it's a problem when these people aren't environmentally conscious. If there is going to be a consistent increase in population, there should also be an increase in environmental awareness so everyone can work together in slowing down this destructive process.
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:03 PM

Climate change is going to affect how we live in the future. It will cause lack of food, energy sources, health risks, climate changes, drought etc. It is because of our growing population and the amount of people the world has to take care of for all of us to survive. We are also using too many of its resources too quickly. What could we do now to try to slow down the process of it happening? 

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Canyons

Canyons | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A canyon is a deep, narrow valley with steep sides."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This encyclopedic entry is a concise explanation of the environmental forces that create canyons. 


Tags: water, physical, geomorphology, landforms, National Geographic.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:45 AM

Canyons are really cool to look at, but they also tell stories.  The various layers of rock can be dated based on crystal structures and possible organic content in sediment, and the eroded sides can be traced back to wind, or in some areas, water-based erosion patterns.  I think that shows that one does not just have to look at the rocks, but one can use their imagination to view history, and even infinite time by considering that the canyons are transient and shifting messages that are carved into rocks by the world, and the universe.  I think that where the article said people have relied on and depended on canyons, it brings to the surface more illumination of the immense convenience of humans having everything they need to survive- just on this one planet...  Food, clothes, shelter, can be created by what is around us.  It is like we were put here with resources- it sorta feels like some of the Sim games.  I do believe aliens are responsible for putting what is now known as the human species on this planet, and I do believe in the abstract yet artificial terraformation of Earth by aliens.  Canyons erode, and die away, as do humans.  I can't help but believe that they are messages from the natural universe, along with the material resource provisions that have been so widely abundant for humans on this planet.

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Terraced Rice Fields

Terraced Rice Fields | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See a photo of an aerial view of a terraced rice field in China and download free wallpaper from National Geographic.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This image shows is one of the more beautiful cultural landscapes that shows the great extent of agricultural  modifications of the environment.  National Geographic's photo of the day is a great source for images that start class discussions and can enliven class content. You may download a high resolution version of the image here

 

Tags: National Geographic, agriculture, landscape, China.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:42 PM

Rice fields are pretty neat. You need to be one meticulous person to be able to build these fields. The shapes of them and the erosion that occurs to the oldest ones form interesting patterns. These ariel shots are worthwhile looking at and seeing where exactly the rice is growing is cool.

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Sharks, Murals and Globes

Seth Dixon's insight:

To see videos (and many more pictures) of the National Geographic Society's headquarters, visit the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance site.  Especially interesting was National Geographic's production of a Cuba map.   

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The Road Map Project

The Road Map Project | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Road Map Project brings together experts in geography, education, and research to chart a course for the large-scale improvement of K-12 geography education in the U.S.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some great educators and geographers have collaborated to design a "road map" for the future of geography education.  This is their report.


Tag: National Geographic, geography education.

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Angela Antle's curator insight, February 23, 2013 9:31 AM

Ocean maps - National geographic

Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 23, 2013 9:42 AM

Some great educators and geographers have collaborated to design a "road map" for the future of geography education.  This is their report.


Tag: National Geographic, geography education.

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Migration and Geography

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Tony King's comment, January 13, 2013 11:35 AM
Just in case a lot of perfectly sane Americans decide to migrate to a civilized country like Canada
Trisha Klancar's curator insight, January 13, 2013 2:04 PM

I like this as it also sets up the beginning of the lesson if you were were unsure what to do with this.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 10:07 PM

Migration is what is need in order for the human race to relate to one another and survive. This shows us how we can learn form Migration from a geographical stand point. If you look at the Geography of how and where people move you will it will help you to develop a sense of what is next to come or what is needed to survive.

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Top 10 “Nat Geo Talks” of 2012

Top 10 “Nat Geo Talks” of 2012 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Live presentations have been a part of National Geographic since the 1800s, and today more than 140 are viewable online. See this year's best.
Seth Dixon's insight:

These talks are always quality presentations and this set of 10 videos is a part of the Explorers Journal sponsored by the National Geographic Society. 

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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, December 27, 2012 8:22 PM

Videos on various geography topics

 

Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 28, 2012 6:27 AM

Top 10 National Geographic Talks!!!!

asnal abbas's comment, December 31, 2012 8:05 AM
http://www.fecebook.com
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Energy Conservation

Energy Conservation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Energy conservation starts at home....


This interesting National Geographic article emphasizes how consumption patterns in the home are connected to some of the serious global issues that we currently face.  This article becomes an exploration into how to go about creating a more environmentally sustainable home. 

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Teresa Gallego Navarro's curator insight, December 18, 2012 9:50 PM

The best energy is the one we don´t consumpt!!

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Geography and the Common Core

Geography and the Common Core | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In 2010, most states in the United States (including Rhode Island) adopted the Common Core State Standards as the new standards.   The two main portions of the Common Core Standards are the English...


Will geography be permanently pushed out of the curriculum with the adoption of the Common Core?  How can a teacher bolster spatial thinking and geo-literacy within the Common Core framework?  If you've asked yourself these questions, this resource is for you. 

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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:39 PM

This article is under intellectual/arts in the United States, because it is about education. It talks about how the standards of the common core are spreading and how this will affect geography.

 

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Russian Summer

Russian Summer | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At the dacha, the soul of Russia--and its cultural divide--is on display. In vacation cottages the women are in housedresses. The men, Speedos and rubber boots. They brood, plant, party, and restore their souls.


The dacha (a seasonal second home or a vacation spot) is incredibly important in Russia.  It is is estimated that over 50% of city residences in Russia own a dacha as a way to culturally connect with the countryside.  This is a nice glimpse into that life. 

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:02 PM

This is definitely a part of the country/cultural side of Russia. Bathing with animals and in lakes like this is definitely not a part of urban Russia. Throughout societies, there is always an urge to live a different lifestyle. In this country, the residents are given an option to live both countryside Russian life and urban Russian life.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:07 AM

“Everyone in Russia has a dacha story”. Dachas are small, summer cottages and cabins that over half of Russia’s population owns. While many people in the United States have this mental image of Russians as drunk, stern, communists, the dacha shows insight to a life much more similar to ours than many people would probably imagine. Russians use dachas as a form of escape, in the same way that many Americans visit a beach house or a mountain cabin in the summer. The need to escape and break through the rut of the daily grind is something that transcends ethnicity or nationality. The need to leave our concrete jungles for the simplicities and feeling of completeness offered by the natural environment is something much more  primordial.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:12 PM

Everyone in Russia has a dacha story. It may be a trace of childhood memory like playing ball late into evening by a sun that won’t set, gathering pinecones to perfume the fire, or swimming in an icy pond. It may be quietly romantic, a first love that fades with the season or blossoms into marriage. An older woman tells of coming home from work to find her husband in bed with her best friend. She kicked him out and, with retirement looming and no husband, wondered, What will I do now? The answer was the dacha she bought for 500 rubles, with a forest nearby for mushroom hunting, a lake, and a garden. “The dacha saved my life,” she says. Sweet or bitter, lighthearted or dark, the story always takes place in summer. A dacha, after all, is a summer cottage.

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Making National Geographic Maps

Making National Geographic Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This map of Cuba, National Geographic's first map of Cuba in over 100 years, has an incredible backstory. 


While touring the National Geographic headquarters, the cartographer Juan Valdés (pictured here with me) told me the story of his early days living in Cuba before Castro,  Pictured is one of his 36 meticulous drafts produced to create this cartographic masterpiece of his home country.  To hear it in his own words, embedded in this link is a 18 minute video of his talk at National Geographic on Cuba and the production of the map.  The last 7 minutes are especially helpful for mapping students to see all the decisions and stages involved in creating a professional reference map.


Tags: cartography, mapping, National Geographic, Latin America, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:54 PM

For starters, these pictures were fascinating to look at. It was amazing to see how much time and effort goes in making just one map. The video was informative and really gives you an idea of the unique process that is being done. The pictures fascinated me the most though. You could just tell just by looking at the pictures that they take what they do seriously. Also, you can tell that they are passionate about what they do. You can especially tell that you yourself had a great time and that you were really interested in what was going on. It is really awesome that National Geographic interviewed you about your visit. In the video, it was nice that he started off with some background information about Cuba and the special times that he shared with his father that made him go into cartography. Overall, the pictures and the video were really a sight to see.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:11 PM

This was a great presentation. I cant imagine how long it must take to make an accurate map, especially when these cartographers are so passionate about their work and their craft.  You can tell that to be a cartographer, you must be extremely passionate and dedicated to your craft.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, April 16, 2015 4:58 PM

It's absolutely crazy to be that Juan Valdes had up to thirty-six different drafts of the map of Cuba, just to come up with the one, most accurate map of the country. When I see maps, I never think of how long it must have taken to get it exactly the way it is to be the most accurate map possible.  It also makes me wonder how completely accurate our maps are, because when comparing multiple, you can see slight differences.

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Geo-Literacy

Geo-Literacy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance seeks to promote geo-literacy here in the Ocean State.  So what is geo-literacy? The National Geographic Society’s Educational team...


As the Alliance Coordinator for the state of Rhode Island, I organized  these three videos (two from National Geographic) and some pictures to provide a basis for understanding what geo-literacy is and why it is important for society and within the workforce.  In the spirit of sharing, I thought I'd share these links beyond the borders of Rhode Island. 

 

Tags: GeographyEducation, NationalGeographic, geo-inspiration, RhodeIsland.

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