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Why Canada needs a flood of immigrants

Why Canada needs a flood of immigrants | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Between now and 2021, a million jobs are expected to go unfilled across Canada. Ottawa is making reforms to the immigration system but isn't going far enough. We need to radically boost immigration numbers. With the right people, Canada can be an innovative world power. Without them, we'll drain away our potential."  This article clearly articulates some of the economic ramifications of the later stages of the demographic transition and some of the difficulties that are associated with a declining internal population. 

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Kendra King's curator insight, January 28, 2015 7:50 PM

The article makes a strong case for Canada to increase their immigrant quota. According to the article, by 2021 one million jobs will be vacant. Since the population of the country is only 34 million, simple math dictates that a lack of supply means the country needs to turn outward. Admittedly, a mass increase in people won’t solve the problem entirely. However, the article goes on to explain how “innovations” occur more when people of different backgrounds work together. Looking at the United States, many of our startup companies have immigrants on the board of them. So, immigrants will do more than just fill the one million open jobs. All this means that no Canadian can really be angry at immigrants for “taking their jobs,” which one of the immigrants interviewed for this article (Keiron Tanner) said was his experience thus far. So in one way an economic justification is a good way to go because of the clear need that no one can really argue about.

 

However, an economics justification really needs to be implemented in a manner that continues to support the strength of the aforementioned argument. Even though more people are needed, the government is assigning immigrants temporary visas, thereby giving the impression that these people are just going to leave. Yet Mr. Tanner, the immigrant mentioned earlier, wanted to become a permeant resident. He said “he knew…this (Canada) is where I would be staying.” Yet, what happens if the Government doesn’t get back to him before his visa runs out? The article mention an increase in immigration workers would be need to help process all of this information. I am thinking that if there aren’t enough government workers to keep up with the increase in immigrants, some will just let their visas expire and stay illegally like some people in the United States. When this happens more economics arguments will be thrown around, but this time in a negative light because now the immigrants aren’t paying taxes. Furthermore, other arguments, like the legality of the workers, will be put into the mix as well.    

 

Another issue in framing the immigration problem solely on economics is that it underscores the human nature of this issue. People often do not adapt to change well. I imagine Canadians’ won’t either, especially given how proud they are of their heritage. I remember learning in French class years ago that they had their own committee called the Académie Française who review the language to get rid of words that aren’t French sounding enough. What happens with the language they guard when it is mixed with the language of their new immigrants? A business owner in Steinbach claimed he just hired workers who all spoke German, so his workers could just keep speaking German and language wouldn’t be an issue. Yet the langue could still mix as people try adopting to their new home. I also wonder how citizens will react to the new comers when it comes to other values. Do all the teachers react empathetically to the students who did not want to take yoga for reasons related to culture like Mr. Klassen? Or were the students just lucky he gets the final say because he is the superintendent? All of these questions eluded to the point that conflicts will arise. I just hope it isn’t  pushed aside as a minor issue like this article does on numerous occasions or seen as a one way equation in which only the immigrants need to adjust (i.e. section on Mr. & Ms. Lima).  

 

Overall, keeping the American notion of immigration in mind while I follow this topic will be interesting. Canada doesn’t exactly have a border issue like we do. The country is smaller, their government reacts differently, and their values are different too. Still though some human phycology is just universal (i.e. difficulty with change). Immigration is therefore bound to affect Canadian’s in a different manner, but just how differently is the question? 

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Why more Mexicans are staying home

Tiny Tamaula is the new face of rural Mexico: Villagers are home again as the illegal immigration boom drops to net zero. Full story on CSMonitor.com: http:/...

 

Contrary to popular opinion, illegal immigration from Mexico to the United States is not really a problem in 2012.  As conditions on both sides of the border have changed, this gives a glimpse into the life choices of Mexican villagers.  For more on this issue see the complete article at: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Americas/2012/0408/Home-again-in-Mexico-Illegal-immigration-hits-net-zero ;

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 11:55 AM

I enjoy stories like this, because it demonstrates people willing to fight for their home. Many interesting ideas lie behind stories such as this one, but what I find especially intriguing is the dynamics of money in relation to these small rural villages. Money and "income" drives our current economic positions, but there are some places which were left behind and have none of the jobs we in the first world would traditionally think of. They had to either subside off their own products through farming, or trade their livelyhood for a small amount of money. Put simply, money is necessary for a so called "modern" existence, but not necessary for survival. These villagers are working for their own future in their home country now though, while it may not be necessarily profitable in the short term, it will pay off for their children in the long term.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:29 AM

(Mexico topic 1)
"Things are not good in the United States. There is not a lot of work and Mexicans like to keep busy." I was surprised by this this comment which sums up one of the main reasons why many Mexican immigrants are returning to Mexico. This implies that as the American economy has worsened, Mexico's must be improving (at least by comparison). This completely supports the concept of Mexico evolving into a "semi-core" country.
   Additionally, I hope this quote will help to shed some truth onto the negative lazy stereotype many Americans associate with immigrating Mexicans.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 6:39 PM

With a little help from the video, it is clear now, to understand why many Mexican folks are actually not leaving their country for the US. It said in the video that there is not a lot of work in the US and Mexicans like to keep busy. Also, a lot of Mexicans are finding opportunity right in their own country where there once was no opportunity. Electricity reaches the house, they have paved roads and updated pipes. They will need to rely on us for fuel. It is also nice for them to know that they do not need to leave their families behind in Mexico while they go to the US, they can have the satisfaction of working in local fields and seeing family when they get home at the end of the day. 

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America Is Stealing the World’s Doctors

America Is Stealing the World’s Doctors | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Who wants to practice medicine in a country where they use power tools in surgery? The dilemma of doctors in the developing world.

 

This article's title is inflammatory, but it touches on some very real interconnected geographic issues.  Economic development in the many parts of the world is complicated by the migration issue of 'brain drain.'  The individual choices that doctors from the less developed world face often lead the best and brightest workers to leave their home country.  If you could make a very good living as in the United States (the median salary of a surgeon in New Jersey is $216,000) or go back to your home country where your skills are more desperately needed (in Lusaka, Zambia a surgeon makes about $24,000 a year), which would you choose?  This is not a hypothetical example (nor one with only one right answer) but one rooted in a globalized economy, where the places that offer the greatest opportunities for individual advancement get the top talent--excellent for the individual and family economies but problematic at the national scale.

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Haitian 'invasion' in rural America

Haitian 'invasion' in rural America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over the past 18 months thousands of Haitians have flocked to a small town in rural North Carolina.

 

This video is filled with geographic content.  How does immigration change the cultural and economic profile?  While large cities are typically the destinations for migrants why are these Haitians coming to this small town? 

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 8, 2014 5:52 PM

This video is about a sudden influx of Haitian immigrants in a small rural town in North Carolina. This is not typical because because immigrating to the United States usually means settling in cities.

 

The atypical destination is the result of where job availability is currently located in the United States. Many of the immigrants had originally tried Florida and found either little work or much worse conditions in a city like Miami. In this rural area of North Carolina, there were some grueling factory jobs (I worked one once, they suck but the pay was not awful) that weren't being filled so the Haitians simply went where the jobs were. Filling the jobs that weren't being filled can only be good for that local economy and signs of Haitian culture are cropping up in the form of restaurants and church services. Unfortunately, poverty is a problem for these immigrants but being in a rural area means the cost of living is likely lower so there may be a better quality-of-life for them there than a city so long as the jobs last.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 13, 2015 12:06 AM

It made me happy to hear that they were welcomed in by locals. I don't feel like Americans have the strongest track record of accepting new comers. I am happy that the people have an new opportunity at life, they deserve it just as much as anyone else.

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Flowstrates: Analyzing refugee flows between two regions

This video is a demonstration of Flowstrates, a visualization technique for exploring the temporal changes in origin-destination data (e.g. migrations, movem...

 

The video shows the flow of refugees: where are they coming from and where are they going to?  What explains some of these patterns? 

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Increasing Density and Diversity Likely to Make Western States More Blue

Increasing Density and Diversity Likely to Make Western States More Blue | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new report finds growing urban and minority populations that will affect redistricting and reapportionment in the Mountain West.

 

The Intermountain West has been a bastion of strength for the Republican Party for many years now.  Migration into the urban areas may lead to redistricting, giving urban voters (typically leading more to the Democrats) more influence.  However, it all comes down to the critical 'where' question.  Where will the lines be drawn?  

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Asians in the U.S. labor force, 2008–2010

Asians in the U.S. labor force, 2008–2010 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Editor's Desk: U.S.Bureau of Labor Statistics...

 

Ethnic geography, migration and economic geography intersect in this compelling infographic. 

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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:56 AM

This chart shows the labor force from 2008 to 2010. It what kind of races were active in the labor force and the percentage the race made up of the labor force. It also shows what kind of work they did and how much of the percentage of that race was involved in a specific line of work.

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:57 PM

Migration refers to the movement of people across borders. This graph/article illustrates the large amount of Asians migrating to the United States, and joining the work force. The graph further breaks down the "Asians" by specific origin and ethnicity, showing that Chinese Asians are the most prominent in the US workforce. 

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The Geography of Stuck

The Geography of Stuck | Geography Education | Scoop.it
America can be divided into two distinct classes, the stuck and the mobile...

 

Migration as a simply a function of push factors and pull factors needs to be more fully fleshed out.  Not everyone is equally able to move freely (as those of you with mortgages can attest to) and that has a strong spatial relationship within the United States. 

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Mapping migration-China and India

Mapping migration-China and India | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Where are the world's biggest Chinese and Indian immigrant communities? MORE Chinese people live outside mainland China than French people live in France, with some to be found in almost every country.

 

The two most populous countries in the world, India and China, are mentioned frequently when teaching population geography.  However, it is typical in the United States to pass over these countries when discussing migration; this graphic shows the diasporas are quite extensive and highly influential. 


Via Tony Burton
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Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:59 PM

When I first came across this article I thought it was intriguing but not surprising. Most people fleeing from India and China go somewhere nearby versus somewhere far away. Places like Cambodia, Vietnam, and Indonesia have a high rate of Chinese and Indian migrants, which proves one of Ravenstein's laws.

Clayton and Annie's curator insight, February 12, 2015 10:07 AM

This is showing indias geography. This article is telling you where the most populated parts of India are. Which are most of them live out side of China. The two most populated countrys are India and China. India has a higher people per square mile than China. 

Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:58 AM

Summary- More Chinese people live outside mainland China than French people live in France. Some 22m ethnic Indians are scattered across every continent. Diasporas have been a part of the world for millennia; they are quite extensive and highly influential.The map highlights the world's top 20 destinations for Chinese and Indian migrants

 

Insight- since China and India are the most populous countries of the world, it makes sense that we ask ourselves "well, do people there ever go to other places to find a little bit more of personal space that is so scarce in their home countries?" They actually do. Maybe it is not because they need personal space. Working opportunities and better living conditions might be what drives these people to migrate from their countries.

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Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy

Immigration to U.S. From Mexico in Decline Amid Tough Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The number of Mexicans leaving for the United States is just about cancelled out by the number returning, according to statistics provided by the Mexican government.


Besides being an important (underreported) political fact, this new migratory pattern can lead to a good discussion of push and pull factors that lead to the geography of migration. 

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Max Minard's curator insight, March 23, 2015 8:57 PM

Back in 2012, the number of Mexican immigrants coming to America had declined due to several push factors, mainly involving the rough economy "north of the border". Despite the fact that many Mexican immigrants are still migrating to America, many have decided against this decision based off factors such as the risk of the making the trek and the more evident reason being that America's economy is going through a rough time. They don't want to show up in America unable to find employment which is the reason they had left their previous country. I personally think this is an accurate outlook considering 2012 experienced many rough patches in the economy which can further result in the decrease in incoming immigrants. Overall, this tough and amid economy in America along with the long, risky trek can both be classified as push factors, pushing away Mexican immigrants from wanting to settle in The United States.

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Latinization of Southern Space and Place

Latinization of Southern Space and Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Latinization of Southern Space and Place project investigates how the myriad discourses of migration and globalization have become manifest graphically across social spaces and street graphics in the contemporary American South.

 

As local demographics change, so does the cultural landscape and--as evidenced by Alabama writing the toughest anti-immigration law in the U.S.--the political landscape.   

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NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity

NYTimes video: Sweden's Immigrant Identity | Geography Education | Scoop.it
One out of four Swedes are immigrants or have a parent with an immigrant background.

 

Demographic shifts leading to political and cultural tensions.   Europe, which historically has been a source of migrants, is relatively new to be a destination for migrants and that has heightened some of the conflicts. 

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 6:29 PM

This video is shows the changing demographics of Sweden. Sweden and several other wealthier countries of Europe are now destinations for immigrants where they were once the origin of them. The change is difficult for these nations as they are somewhat unprepared economically and politically for significant immigration.

 

The immigrants end up feeling unwanted in their new country and their old. This feeling of being unwanted is possibly worse than it would be in the United States, a country more accustomed to immigration.

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, March 29, 2014 8:07 PM

This growingly intense immigration situation parallels that of our own here in the U.S. and in many other countries throughout the world. World citizens, refugees, don't feel at home in their birth country nor do they feel welcomed in their current home or host country. This puts a lot of stress and pressure on these already punished populations. That's not to say that the host countries concerned citizens don't have a reason to be worried, but are their responses appropriate or productive?  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:29 AM

Europe is a place that makes traveling to different countries relatively easy. This makes sense that their would be migration that is inter-european. 

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MigrationsMap.net

MigrationsMap.net | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Interactive Migrations Map: Where are migrants coming from? Where have migrants left?

 

This is a great resource for a population unit or in a regional class. 

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Seth Dixon's comment, September 22, 2011 8:55 PM
My pleasure...There are plenty of demographic links that I have scooped on this page and I hope others can be of use to you.
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For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter

For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A study sees a decline in immigration to the United States from Mexico after tightened border control, increased deportations, a flagging U.S. economy and a declining Mexican birthrate.

 

The wave of immigrants coming into the USA is something of the past. Push factors: Why are more Mexicans choosing to stay in Mexico?  Pull factors: Why is the United States less on an option for many would-be migrants these days?  Cross-border issues: How are issues on both sides of the border changing these patterns? 

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Mikaela Kennedy's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:48 PM

One of the last lines in this really stood out to me: "Mexicans would rather be in a precarious situation than a situation of fear."  I feel as though that is true for all people living on earth. 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:59 AM

(Mexico topic 3)

   Instead of focusing on the reasons behind the decline/reversal in Mexico-America immigration in my first topic, for this article I would like to mention how the facts cited differ so greatly from what is being broadcast and inferred from larger news agencies. Especially within the last few months, I would've thought that Mexican immigration into the US would be at an all-time high. Never would I have previously guessed that it would be closer to a net gain of near 0 (or even a net loss). This goes to show how news agencies "cater" to certain demographics of people and what they want to hear. To me it's like a lobbyist recruitment, trying to gain more supporters of a specific cause in hopes of achieving a specific goal.

   On a separate note, I was interested in the mention of how certain researchers believe the pattern could shift again once the US economy begins to further recover. I wonder if a rise in immigration would actually happen, given that Mexico's economy is now more developed and providing more opportunity? That's something to think about...

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 6:31 PM

I personally do not keep up with immigration statistics in the US whether they be legal or legal, I just knew that people all the time illegally immigrated here from Mexico or other countries. Most of the illegal citizens live in Texas and California. Until now, I never knew that people actually immigrated back to Mexico from the US. This reverse immigration of Mexicans is from a few kay factors, tightened border security, a weak U.S. job and housing construction market. Whether the reversal is temporary or permanent, it could have significant implications for the United States.There is also an idea, that this trend of leaving the US could reverse itself if the US economy boosts, or the Mexican economy fails. 

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Syrian Refugees

Syrian Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Syrians by the thousands are fleeing the violence in their home country and seeking refuge in neighboring countries.

 

Demographics and Politics: This photo essay is a varied glimpse into the refugee camps that have emerged from the Syrian uprisings against the Assad regime.  How are politics and migration connected?  Can you think of other examples where we see similar patterns? 

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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:32 AM

These photos are extremely telling.  What strikes me are the pictures of many of the children.  Most of them have smiles on their faces and look genuinely happy just like any other child, even though their situations are horrific.  I applaud the Turkish government for not turning them away and at least coming up with a temporary solution.


One could say that we have a similar situation going on at our Mexican border.  What is even more problematic is that many people in America feel that we should not only offer no help but we should do our best to drive these innocent people away.  I know it's not an exact comparison but look at these photos from the Turkey/Syria border and if you can say you feel no need to give a helping hand to someone due to their "alien" status, then I would have to say that you are not a human being.

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Kiribati and Climate Change

Kiribati and Climate Change | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Fearing that climate change could wipe out their Pacific archipelago, the leaders of Kiribati are considering an unusual backup plan: moving the population to Fiji.

 

How urgent is the issue of climate change?  That question is not only geographic in content, but the response might also be somewhat contingent on geography as well.  If your country literally has no higher ground to retreat to, the thought of even minimal sea level change would be totally devastating. 

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:31 PM

This shows one of the worst consequences of climate change, large scale migration. If sea levels continue to rise, millions of people will be displaced and other countries will have to take in these environmental refugees. Climate change will directly and indirectly impact the geography of the world. Population geography will be drastically altered when areas like Kiribati are wiped off the map. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 2015 12:06 PM

The people of Kiribati are facing trouble with their archipelago and are considering moving their population to Fiji. Kiribati straddles the equator and is facing severe climate change with many areas rising about sea level. Many of the population has already moved and the increase in sea levels has contaminated the fresh water supply. Kiribati is close to Fiji but there is a major concern on where all of their population will live if making the move. Kiribati is relatively poor and government is trying to purchase land in Fiji to secure their people's safety. 

Fred Issa's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:57 PM

Do you think that you have problems? Review the problem that the people on the Island of Kiribati have right now. Their paradise island is slowly sinking into the ocean, and will leave these people without homes, and livelihoods. Imagine you entire world as you know it slipping below the waves one tide at a time. This is the very real problem that the citizens of this island paradise has right now. The good news is that the people of the Island of Fiji have invited the people from this and other islands to migrate to their island. At a time in our world when refugees from Syria are being turned away from being allowed to escape from the murder machine known as ISIS, this is a welcome sign. I hope the peaceful people of the Island of Kiribati find new safe homes and occupations in Fiji. Fred Issa,

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Belize has a much higher Human Development Index ranking that its Central American neighbors such as Guatemala.  That fact alone makes Belize a likely destination for migrants.  Given that Belize was 'British Honduras' during colonial times, English is (still) the official language, but that is changing as increasingly Spanish-speaking immigrants are changing the cultural profile of Belize.      

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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:18 PM

It's interesting to compare and contrast the reaction of Belize's English-speaking population to an influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants with that of the United States. I enjoyed reading that the welcoming of immigrants by the ruling political system has done much to lessen racial tensions, with the various ethnic groups scattered along the political spectrum. This contrasts sharping with the American political spectrum, where there is a clear racial divide between conservatives and liberals. Americans could learn a lot from Belize in this regard, although the transition has been far from smooth in the nation. Although Spanish is now taught in schools as a result of the reality of the immigration wave in the country, there is some push-back from English speaking groups. Many employees of service industries are losing their jobs to those who can offer bilingual services, as well as some other economic changes as a result of the influx of new immigrants. However, the degree of this tension is a lot lower there than it is in the United States. It will be interesting to see how this debate shapes up in the future; it could very well serve as a helpful model for American politicians.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:49 AM

You won't BELIZE this link.... get it.

I'm hilarious.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:48 PM

This country of Belize seems to be a very interesting place. I never knew that in Central America, there was a country who's official language is English. It is made up of a lot of retired British soldiers and North American "sun seekers." Migration into Belize comes from other place in Central America, of its 300,000 person population, 15% are foreign born. It is now becoming a very mixed country and Spanish is making a gain on English. Schools teach in English, but Spanish lessons are mandatory. A  population boom both helps and hurts the economy. Most migrants are of working age and are willing to work low wages in brutal conditions. A lot of Belizeans tell census that they are not working and with Spanish gaining ground, a lot of monopolistic people are losing jobs to those who are bilingual. Although there are frictions between ethnic groups, in general things are good and political party lines are not divided by ethnicity. 

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Geovisualization of Migration Data

300.000 Norwegians move house every year. If the pattern made by this process could be compressed into one short animation, what would would it look like? What could you learn about your country from such an animation, if anything?
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BandKids13-14's curator insight, September 16, 2013 8:29 PM

It is amazing how many people move each year to and from an area. You don't really see how much immigrants are in your country until you see it on a graph or video. Moving from place to place can be quite expensive. Not only have you just bought a house but you are paying people to help you move or paying rental companies for there vehicles. You might be happy because you're moving to a new location but, not because of the expenses. ~Makayla D

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 10:16 PM

This animation shows the frequency or pattern as to how people migrate. You are able to see just how physically it looks when people are migrating from place to place. You are also allowed to learn as to why they are moving and literally get to see the movement of people leaving or coming into an area.

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder. 

 

The globalization of food, immigration and the diffusion of cultural practices are all richly displayed in this short clip. 

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 26, 2013 9:36 AM

The globalization of food is becoming more apparent in todays culture than ever before. More and more restaurants from different parts of the world are showing up and alot of the food we as Americans are familar with are taking on some new ethnic influences. The currywurst is a great example of one country's culinary favorite around the time of WWII and enhancing it with an American and Indian by way of London flavor. And now it is one of the most popular treats someone can buy while in Germany. Many of our cultures foods are being influenced by others now and flavors are beginning to mix as well as our idea of where foods come from. The diffusion of cultural practices as well as the globalization of food will only grow stronger as time goes on, and so will our taste for a new culinary delight. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:20 PM

Ahhh the currywurst on the street, well i thought this was great very informitive cultural video. The speical dish that is made and served among the streets in germany and all over,  it is thought to be a very weird and almost un appitizing meal to some one like my self.  However those food are very popular and prominate in there culture, just like certian foods, hotdog stands, flaffel carts and other foods that we enjoy have be come common in our culture. However I dont see currywurst hitting the streets of NYC any time soon.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:23 PM

The Currywurst sounds good but it seems that it will upset my stomach. I have a feeling it would. But it seems to be a hit were it is sold because that is what most people eat when they are on the streets burlin.

 

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Blueseed: Business' New "Spatial Fix"

Blueseed: Business' New "Spatial Fix" | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Many site outsourcing as a way in which global corporatations are seeking to avoid the typical economic limitations that have been imposed on job production based on geography.  Some refer to it as a 'spatial fix,' a way to get around the high cost of workers in the developed world being reworking how business gets done.  

 

This takes that to an entirely different level.  The benefits of agglomeration and collaboration help to explain the importance of Silicon Valley.  Entrepreneurs from other countries do not all have access to a comparable location with a high concentration of intellectually driven enterprises that amplify their impacts.  The Blueseed Project intents to, in essence create a floating city in international waters (just off the coast of California) that is outside of U.S. governmental jurisdiction, but easily accessible for Silicon Valley executives.   

 

More questions than answers arise from this project.  How are economic restructurings altering governance?  Are borders becoming less or more important with increased technological advances?  Would this be a benefit to developing world economies or strengthen the Silicon Valley's economic importance in research and development?     

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Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture

Top 10 Reasons Alabama’s New Immigration Law Is a Disaster for Agriculture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Alabama’s new immigration law, H.B. 56, is already devastating the state’s agricultural sector."

 

Does teaching agriculture have to be boring?  This particular issue is an excellent current topic that combines politics, culture and demographics within agriculture.   

 

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Mac steel's comment, March 8, 2013 10:09 AM
Technoloy
Valorie Morgan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:13 AM

The new immigration laws have caused farmers to cut back on crops due to low empolyment rate. The immgrants that were currently working for farmers, ran off in fear of being captured. I'm against this law, I see exactly where the farmers are coming from. I believe these laws are pointless, it's just people trying to make an honest buck in the hot sun. Alabama is losing a great deal of agriculture due to this new law. Even though, they say its againast the law. I don't see the point. Why be so hard on these farmer??

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:08 AM

This article shows how important it is to follow the natural way of agriculture. With the new laws in Alabama being passed it now allows people to grow crops in an unnatural way which is devastating predicament to the agricultural world. 

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Migration in America - Forbes

Migration in America - Forbes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"More people left Phoenix in 2009 than came. The map above visualizes moves to and from Phoenix; counties that took more migrants than they sent are linked with red lines. Counties that sent more migrants than they took are linked with blue lines."

Seth Dixon's insight:


I've sent this link out before, but Forbes now has four articles attached to interactive mapping tool that analyze the data (including one by geographer Michael Conzen).  Also the new data has been added and the visualization has also been improved...very cool features with tremendous amounts of teaching applications.

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Rachael Johns's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:21 AM

In this day and age we see more people migrating then staying. People move for numerous things, a trend that causes a lot of migration is when people retire they move to southern Florida. They get tons of sun rays and meet a lot of people their age there. Another reason people migrate is for jobs. If their job tells them they have to move across state they do which causes more migration. ~R.J~

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:25 AM

The map is what originally attracted me to this article, but I must admit that the actual article was very interesting. Lots of the moves were from Phoenix, Arizona. Why people moved from Phoenix was not information that was disclosed in the article, but because of that, it made me wonder and want to learn more about this topic. AW :)

Nolan Walters's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:30 AM

I've seen something like this before.  More people leaving a location than entering it.  Something may have caused them to move, Push and Pull factors are both in this.  Job opportunities or the extreme heat of Phoenix may have caused them to leave.  It shows that most people went to the Northeast, where it is cooler and has more people.

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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | Geography Education | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 9:57 AM

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:26 PM

i see this as a very good law. America is on the verge of recovering from an economic recession and the United States can benefit from every job given to a natural born american citizen. i do see the problems that a  farmer can have such as receiving a decline in profits if they must pay more for the product. in the article the farmers also say that Americans just do not work like seasoned Hispanics and production is way down. another looming problem that the Americans have is that they are slow, and want to call it a day after lunch, and expect to get paid more. 

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:36 PM

As the title implies, this is about how Americans are not cut out for doing intensive farming jobs because the workers just quit quickly. A few politicians mentioned in the story, Governor Robert Bentley and Senator Scott Beason, said they received thank you messages from constituents who found work. This was supposed to be evidence of Americans benefitting from jobs that immigrants took, but I would love to know how many of those people actually stayed with the job. Furthermore, I find it a bit too suspicious that none of the people wanted to speak with the press as the author mentioned or that the names just weren’t given. I am more inclined to believe the owners of the famers mentioned in the article, who said they can’t keep Americans on their site happy due to lack of pay and benefits. Mind you now it wasn’t just one owner who said this either. I think this is telling as well because the owners are the individuals who best know the industry as they work it every day.

 

From the farmers perspective the new law is now a huge problem that could also affected consumers. They lost steady “Hispanics with experience,” who they knew could handle the work. For some farmers, according to the article, has made it so the produce is left on the vine rotting because it isn’t picked. So in essence, what the Arizona law just did was harm agriculture and the buyers too because if enough of that food perishes the price will go up. Now I can understand a state being aggravated over illegal immigration (it is a serious problem that is nowhere close to being solved), but to pass a law with these kinds of economic ramifications isn’t really helping the situation much either. As much as people hate to admit it, our economy needs immigrants from Mexico for our agriculture sector to work. It is just a little known fact.

 

The new law isn’t the only law at issue in this article. Connie Horner of Georgia tried to legally hire workers through the government’s visa program. She soon found it is too costly for her to do and too time consuming, so instead Ms. Horner is turning to machines. The fact that visas are that hard to attain for workers is also part of the reason the immigrants come illegally. Rather than spending more money to watch the boarder how about the government figure out a way for the bureaucracy of the immigration process to move quicker. This isn’t an issue of 2011 either when the article was written. Listening to the news, I have heard farmers complain about the visa program for years. No wonder immigrants come over illegally and then citizens get angry at these people. Really, American’s should be more annoyed with their government’s ineffective stance on boarder control. 

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CSMonitor: Anti-immigration bill, farming and unemployment

CSMonitor: Anti-immigration bill, farming and unemployment | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Farmers in states like Alabama that have passed strong anti-illegal immigration laws are fighting back, saying they are losing labor and that US workers are unwilling to take up farm work.

 

The connection between immigration, job availability and the recession is not as straightforward as some pundits make it out to be.  Why aren't Americans taking these jobs?  What does that tell us about our economy and the recession?  What does this tell us about migrant labor? 

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NYTimes: One Roof, Three Generations

NYTimes: One Roof, Three Generations | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a converted apartment building in Chinatown, five adults and seven children blend traditional values and rituals with modern roles and responsibilities.

 

This article from the New York Times by Sarah Kramer leads to many cultural question worth exploring.  How does migration impact the culture of families?  How is culture maintained and reproduced?  Why is maintaining cultural connection so vital to these families?  

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