Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The idea behind these images is incredibly powerful and heartbreaking.  The horrific genocide turned neighbor against neighbor and tore communities and a country apart.  I can only imagine the pain for the individuals, but also the trauma inflicted on the national psyche. See also the White House's official statement on the 20th anniversary of the genocide. 


Tags: Rwanda, political, conflict, refugees, Africa.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:35 PM

Rwanda is a genocide that many people don't even know about. Regardless of whether someones heard of it, they should still be aware of how people have lived their lives from that time. Some looking to forgive the people who did this, and others looking to gain forgiveness from those they hurt.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:17 PM

You hear about how people in Rwanda forgiving the perpetrators that killed their families, parents, husbands, and children.  They can say that they have fully forgiven them and that they are on good terms with each other or they forgave someone and that was it.  Seeing the body language that these people have together really makes it real.  Some people are seen awkwardly next to each other while others are touching, even holding hands.  Seeing the pictures of both perpetrator and survivor together after forgiveness has been granted can do a lot more than words can in telling what kind of relationship these people have together twenty years after the genocide. 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:17 AM

In an almost unthinkable arrangement, these pictures feature victims of the Rwandan genocide standing with the perpetrators who often killed their families. In a genocide where most of the killings were committed with machetes and perpetrated by neighbors attacking neighbors, it is difficult to imagine how the survivors feel and how they can stand to forgive the killers. It brings up the question of what right do these killers have to ask forgiveness from their victims?

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Complexity in Syria

Complexity in Syria | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A color-coded map of the country's religious and ethnic groups helps explain why the fighting is so bad.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This map of the various ethnic and religious groups in being shown on major media outlets as some Western countries (including the United States) are considering military action in Syria.  This and other maps like it powerfully conveys while many may conceptualize Syrians as a single monolithic group, that idea is a fiction that was created in the absence of geographic content to fill the void. 


Additionally this diagram has also been circulating lately for the same reasons; this flow chart lays out the Middle East's political rivalries and alliances.  "The enemy of my enemy is my friend" is a well-quoted proverb to simplify Middle Eastern political alliances and rivalries.  Seeing this web, you can only imagine that living by that dictum can certainly lead to complicated geopolitical conflicts among countries and culture groups.


Tags: SyriaMiddleEast, conflict, political, ethnicity, religion.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:19 PM

This map shows tha tthere are an overwhelimg amount of Arabs especially in centeral Syria. And then on the coast lline it is mostly mixed with pink representing the overwhlming other majority.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 2014 8:11 PM

It appears from this article that Syria is a complicated country. The map shows the different ethnic and religious groups of Syria, along with other groups, all of which live within a small area. Syria, along with other countries within the Middle East have been faced with one serious issue or another. Many different people live within a very small area; those people practice different religions and are ethnically and culturally different. Unfortunately, being different in this part of the world may get you killed.   

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 1:25 PM

Maps such as this one are very valuable when trying to understand conflict.  In Syria and the greater Levant area, unbalanced power and representation in politics is the result of many different religious and ethnic groups living in such close proximity each other, allowing conflict to become very invasive.

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Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"GIS has given us the chance to re-examine how the Civil War battle was won and lost." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

July 1-3 mark the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, and it seems only appropriate to share these rich, interactive resources to commemorate the event (this particular interactive feature uses an ESRI storymap template).  This fantastic example from the Smithsonian Magazine shows how history teaching and research can be benefited by using GIS with the example of Gettysburg.  Many student today visit the sites of the Battle of Gettysburg and get a greater appreciation of battle by getting a sense of the lay of the land and the  challenged confronting both armies.  National Geographic has additionally put together resources to display other Civil War battles.  GIS is not a tool that is just for geographers; any analysis that requires spatial analysis can be mapped. 


Tags: historicalwar, landscape, spatial, GIS, ESRI.

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Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 2014 10:34 PM

I really like this interactive map application.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 28, 2014 1:13 PM

unit 1

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 18, 2014 3:14 PM

Just another of the millions of uses for GIS...

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Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An earlier GeoCurrents post on Chechnya mentioned that the Chechens were deported from their homeland in the North Caucasus to Central Asia in February 1944.  However, the Chechen nation was not the only one to suffer such a fate under Stalin’s regime."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a painful page in world history, but it needs retelling.  The Soviet era profoundly reshaped the cultural, political and economic geographies of the region.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Central Asiahistoricalwarethnicitypolitical, gerrymandering.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 12, 2014 1:43 PM

The Soviet Union forced vast amounts of people and ethnic groups out of their historical homelands to settle new areas during the early and mid 20th century. Many of those forced into resettlement died, and today some consider it a genocide or crime against humanity. As ethnic groups were moved out, ethnic Russians were moved in to take their places, and explains why many places outside of Russia (Ukraine) have populations that still maintain strong Russian identities. It also explains why places like Chechnya have such a long history of insurgency and extremism against Russian authority and power.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:37 PM

This graph represents the areas where many of the Chechnes had been displaced to in the era of Stalins regime. Many of these people were displaced from their homes and forced to move. Many of them either had to leave family behind of they were forced to move together and had no initial home to live in.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:51 PM

i see this as history retelling itself. for some reason throughout history terrible men think that their race is better than another, this is not true and if a person wants to think this that is their prerogative, but some men think it to such an extent that they seek to eliminate the entire other people. nothing good can come of this and it turns into mass conflict every time. it destroys countries and breeds hate on all sides.

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North Korea threatens to strike without warning

North Korea threatens to strike without warning | Geography Education | Scoop.it
North Korea turned up the temperature yet another degree on its neighbors Monday, warning that it would not give any advance notice before attacking South Korea.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This CNN video briefly highlights why many pundits think "this time is different" --the rhetoric and threatens have gone far beyond what North Korea has done in the past.  You might also enjoy the Plaid Avenger's always irreverant analysis in this 'plaidcast.' 


TagsNorth Korea, war, conflict.

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:29 AM

Kim Jung-Un's reckless actions and threats that were the highlights of the beginning of his regime was nothing more than a frivoulous attempt at displaying his power.  He wanted the world to see his legitimacy as a leader, whether or not it was known he is the leader of a cult of personality. He wanted us to take him seriously, and in a way we did, as these threats were the talk among the nation for a bit.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:31 AM

The situation in North Korea is becoming increasingly troubling. Kim Jon Un has proven himself to be an unstable actor on the world stage. By all reports, it seems that the young leader is crazy. In this case, this nut case has a nuclear arsenal to play with. An attack on South Korea would trigger an automatic response from the U.S.  The Korean war could literally resume in a matter of minutes. Negotiating with the North Korean regime is futile at best. How can you negotiate with a nation that refuses to honor any type of international agreement? North Korea survives, because China allows it to. If the North Korean threat is ever eliminated, it will be China, not the United States that eliminates it.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:08 PM

Since the ceasefire was declared in 1953, tensions have always ran high between the democratic South and the communist North of the Korean peninsula. Petty threats are the norm, with either side threatening to destroy the other should they continue to escalate tensions, occasionally made worse by the stray shot that makes its way across the border. North Korea has been the more aggressive of the two, using threats of violence to force the West to provide its starving masses with foreign aid. Any hopes that new North Korean leader Kim Jong Un would be less extreme than his father have since been extinguished, as Un has further ruined relations between his government and his southern neighbors. Both China and the US have condemned the North's actions, with China hoping its smaller ally will cease its irrational foreign policy as the Chinese attempt to cement their place as a global power. There has been over 60 years of relative peace between the two countries, with most Koreans today having never seen the conflict itself, and it is hoped that this peace will continue. However, for as long as Un and his communist party maintain their vice-like grip on their nation's peoples, the threat of violence- and the violation of human rights within their own borders- will continue.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a very intriguing infographic (download high-resolution image here).  How are old colonial patterns a thing of the past?  How do old colonial patterns continue to affect the African continent? 


Tags: Africa, states, language, infographic, historical, colonialism.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 2015 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

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A very good sign that North Korea is bluffing about war

A very good sign that North Korea is bluffing about war | Geography Education | Scoop.it

If Pyongyang is as bent on war as it wants us to believe, why is it keeping the inter-Korean Kaesong industrial complex open?


Seth Dixon's insight:


News reports coming out of North Korea are grim and threatening right now.  However, this Washington Post article argues that it might be all for show.  The Kaesong Industrial Complex was opened in 2002 as a gesture of peace.  Located just across the northern side of the border, it is staffed by South and North Koreans (South Korea get super cheap labor, North Korea gets an infusion of currency, both get positive PR). The Kaesong Industrial Complex continues to operate with the permission of the North Korean government.  Were that to ever change and North Korea shut down this joint venture, THEN we'll know that they are serious.  Watch this short video for an overview of the geopolitical situation on the Korean peninsula as of March 2013. 


TagsNorth Korea, war, labor, industry, economicconflict, unit 6 industry.

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Jusvic Dublois & Cooper Baddley's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:06 PM

 This falls under politics. This article says that North Korea is probley bluffing on going to war with us. They are saying that why would you keep the inter korean industrial complex open if they where. This is in Pyongyang North Korea

Anthony morales's curator insight, October 28, 2014 12:39 PM

korea wants to start a war but are bluffing because they are leaving one of there main nueclar factories open and not closed off 

 This is a part of PERSIA by this ties in with economy by how Kim Jong lil has to decide what happens in this country

AnthonyAcosta/NoahMata's curator insight, November 5, 2014 1:32 PM

North Korea War

 

The North Korean leader is showing that he is pro war but the actions that he is taking lead us to believe that he is "All Talk". Does he really feel that war is the best option at this point or does he just want to seem like he is the best.  

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Syria for Educators

Syria for Educators | Geography Education | Scoop.it
-Introduction (1 minute) -Sign up for a free Prezi account and give your students background with the Syria the Basics   PREZI . (5 minutes)  - Follow up with another   PREZI   about Youth...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Have you wanted to teach about current events in Syria but weren't sure where to start?  This resource suggested by the Arizona Geographic Alliance has lesson plans, materials and resources for all grades.  


Tags: Syria, conflict, K12, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Don't make the same anti-terrorism mistakes in Mali

Don't make the same anti-terrorism mistakes in Mali | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Balancing the interests of stakeholders in the Malian polity will be difficult, however some key steps should be taken.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great article for give to students to provide them with the geo-political context to understand the situation in Mali.  It also give a great reminder for observers and the involved parties to not lump all Tuareg civilians in the north with the Islamists groups that are in control.  "This failure to consistently distinguish between different groups in the North by multiple stakeholders...portends longer term trouble."  For additional reading, see this Geography in the News article on Mali, tailor-made for classroom.    


Tags: Mali, Africa, political, conflict, war.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:33 AM

Problems in this area will only increase if the powers that be do not take the innocence of the civilian population into account.  When trying to put down a terrorist insurgence it is imperative that a government tries to safe guard the population.  If not it will only drive these people into the arms of the insurgents.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:44 PM

Removing the Mali president was only the first thing French military did to this nation. Mali needs to move forward from anti-terrorism and hopefully they can do so with little difficulty.

Shounam's curator insight, October 8, 2014 6:08 PM

Stop mistaking the image of muslim or islamic people as terrorists.

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Mali in Crisis

Mali in Crisis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
France is ready to stop Islamist militants who control northern Mali, the French president says, following a plea for help by his Malian counterpart.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In April 2012, Islamist rebels seized power in Northern Mali and have declared independence, proclaiming this region The Islamic State of Azawad.  Recently they have begun to amass armies on the southern limits of their territory and presumably are seeking to topple all of Mali.  The former colonizer, France is being called upon to assist as is the United Nations.  This area is part of a region known as the Sahel, the transition from a dry North Africa to tropical Sub-Saharan Africa, from a Muslim/Arab north to a Christian/Animist/Black region of Africa.  The human and physical geographic divisions in this region plays a major role in this conflict.  


Tags: Mali, Africa, political, conflict, war.

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Josephine Castro's curator insight, September 12, 2013 2:35 AM

Islamist militants control Northern Mali

 

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:41 AM

What also was very dangerous about this was that Mali became a safe haven for terrorist groups such as Al-Qaeda,  because of their Islamic ties to the rebels.  If we allow them to control this region, who knows what they could plan.  We spent all this time making them run, giving them a new base would undo a lot of work that has been done in the past 12 years. 

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An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London

An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The extent of the campaign is shocking.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This map is just overwhelming when you consider that each data point represents a bomb dropped on the city. 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:46 PM

This is one of my favorite maps that I have seen. How devastating it must have been to live in London at the time, never knowing where the next one would land to destroy the city.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 7:50 AM

This map shows the locations for the nearly 2000 bombs which were dropped on London during the Blitz in WWII. The bombs were dropped entirely inside the ring of M25 London Orbital Motorway which encircles London. The bombs are most concentrated in the center of the ring, likely to do the most damage, to either infrastructure or the people.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:30 PM

This map shows just how devastating the bombs were on London. At first glance, this does not look like a map of the bombs dropped. It would not be until it was labeled as such would it show the results of the war on London. Very few areas were unaffected and the majority of London was hit.

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Israeli/Palestinian Conflict

With a simple class hashtag (e.g.-#geog400ric) you can create a backchannel for student to collaborate outside the classroom walls. 

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Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped

Gaza-Israel crisis 2012: every verified incident mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This map shows each verified incident of violence in Gaza and Israel since last week's assassination of Hamas leader Ahmed al-Jabari.  Geospatial technologies combined with social media are changing how we learn about (and wage) wars. 

 

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The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene

The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene | Geography Education | Scoop.it
84% of Americans are unable to locate Ukraine on a world map; those that can't are more likely to support military intervention.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As I've said before, a more informed, geo-literate citizenry helps to strengthen U.S. foreign policy and diplomatic efforts because they have a spatial framework within which to organize political, environmental, cultural and economic information.  National Geographic recently also produced a video showing how geo-education is important for business professionals as a part of their geo-education community (if you haven't already, join!).  This is one way to combat geographic ignorance.

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David R. Perry's curator insight, April 7, 2014 11:38 PM

Beyond sad.

Rach Brick's curator insight, April 13, 2014 10:45 PM

This says so much about ignorance and aggression... Do they even know that they'd have to come up with a catchy name because the Crimea has already got a war names after it?

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:16 PM

unit 2

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:16 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article features an interactive map that displays the numbers of IDPs (internally displaced persons) made by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. You are able to look through the years and see the varying amounts of IDPs, as well as the countries that produced the most of them and which continue to.

 

This goes along with the human geography theme of refugees and IDPs, and this is a very helpful article in providing a simple way to see an overview of where and to what extent this most occurs. 

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Republicans and Millennials Are More Likely to Find Syria on a Map

Republicans and Millennials Are More Likely to Find Syria on a Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
45 percent think the U.S. should intervene, but only half can identify the country.
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Kent State: Past and Present

Kent State: Past and Present | Geography Education | Scoop.it

On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard gunned down Jeffrey Miller, Allison Krause, William Knox Schroeder, and Sandra Scheuer during an anti-war protest at Kent State University.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a poignant image that strikes a chord with me.  History is embedded within place even if the historical events are not memorialized within the landscape.  May 4, 2013 not only marked the anniversary of the Kent State tragedy, it also was the day that the great Wilbur Zelinsky passed away. He was a geographer who analyzed the cultural landscape as well as anyone ever did, and I consider myself fortunate enough to have had conversations with him while I was at Penn State. 

   

Tags: historicalwar, landscape.

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Maegan Anderson's comment, May 7, 2013 12:37 AM
speechless...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, May 10, 2013 9:39 AM

Photos like this that juxtapose the original photograph to present day surroundings always grab me.  What an interesting discussion this could be in a history classroom!

Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:52 PM

Kent State: Past and Present | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

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Where North Korea wants to Attack!

From the NY Times: "North Korea, which seemed to be running out of tubs to thump, found a new target for its ire in a propaganda video released Saturday on Uriminzokkiri, a government Web site.

To a soundtrack of fervent synthesizers and inspirational light rock, the video announces that North Korea will aim nuclear weapons (that it may, or may not, be able to launch) at Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, Honolulu and… Colorado Springs, Co.

The unorthodox move — apparently an attempt to target the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or Norad, and the United States Air Force Academy — is compounded by the fact that Pyongyang does not quite know where the city is. The map shown in the video places it somewhere in Louisiana."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I wish this had sub-titles, but it is an incredibly awesome bit of North Korea's famous jingoistic propaganda from their media that essentially is the least free press in the world (maybe subtitles would ruin the unintentional comedy).  I find this equal parts hilarious and unnerving, but totally mesmerizing.


TagsNorth Korea, war, conflict.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:35 PM

We watched this video in class and its just absurd. North Korea has no idea what they are doing and what are they going to attack? Nuclear weapons are no joke but this video is pretty funny.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:24 PM

North Korea uses propaganda videos in order to convince its citizens that they are in fact, the biggest and baddest. This video is supposed to show North Koreans that they should not fear the United States because they (might?) have nuclear missiles that can potentially reach American soil, specifically DC, Los Angeles, Hawaii, and Colorado Springs (though they depict Norad as being in Louisiana, not Colorado). North Korea's policies regarding outside media keep the people dependent on the government as a source of information. While the United States is quite sure that North Korea cannot in fact reach the United States, the idea is still unnerving. As military technologies develop, physical geography may no longer be a form of defense, 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 8:54 AM

Of course it is going to be scary when you watch a video of missiles be launched towards your country.  That's simply just the surface of things, but any educated person knows that you need to put everything and anything into the proper context.  So, in order to get a true measure of this videos legitimacy you need to analyze a few areas.

 

First off, the video is in Korean, so I personally do not know what they are saying which makes me hesitant to overreact. There is a visual I see but sometimes pictures tell a whole different story than the actual situation.  Secondly, this could be simply propaganda to invoke confidence in its citizens.  Just like every government on the face of the earth, they might be just trying to convince its people that they are safe due to their military mite and the capability of defending their homeland.  Lastly, what type of weight would I put on a source that is inaccurate.  They clearly mislabel Colorado Springs.  If this attack was legitimately imminent don't you think they would have things accurate down to the millimeter?????  

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Syrian refugees update 2013

Syrian refugees update 2013 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Another refugee camp opened today in Mrajeeb al-Fhood, Jordan, to accommodate the reported 1,500 to 2,000 Syrians fleeing to Jordan daily.  Just over a year ago the Big Picture posted an entry of the growing number of people displaced due to the conflict that now has lasted over two years. The United Nations recently said a total of around 7,000 to 8,000 Syrians are leaving their country daily; there are 1.3 million Syrian refugees and almost 4 million more have been displaced inside Syria since the start of the conflict. Posted here is another glimpse of daily life for those displaced since the beginning of this year." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

These 37 images are excellent, but I chose to share this particular one, because the combination of poverty and happiness embody the purpose behind refugee camps.  While the living conditions are grim and far from ideal, they are better than the alternative for these refugees and the assistance that they are receiving from the international community can be a ray of hope for the future of these children.  In this picture, Syrian refugee children play in Sidon, located in southern Lebanon. 


Tags: Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

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MAANDO_PROTOTYPE's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:19 PM

http://syria-freedom-2014.tumblr.com/
FREEDOM GRAFFiTi WEEK Syria ... MAANDO...PROTOTYPE
#Syria #MAANDO #PROTOTYPE #SYRIAN

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:13 PM

Conflicts in Syria have led almost 4 million refugees to displace to Jordan. Refugee camps have been set up to aid these families the best ways possible. although conditions are still tough, they are much safer than in Syria. These photos embrace the combinations of struggle and joy. Children cry and children play. Families create homes within the tents and make due with what they have.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:21 PM

It’s great to know the many good things people are trying to do to protect some of their citizens. When looking at the pictures, there obviously wasn’t much of a home aspect to their living situation but it’s great to know that they seem to be happier where they are now to where they were before. The picture with the Syrian refugee little boy shaking hands with an Emirati Red Crescent is priceless. The smile on that little boys face touched me and I could feel the happiness with his smile. The facts that the citizens have a choice to leave for a better environment is great and knowing there is a happier ending for them is great. The picture with the kids playing and smiling is also great. As a student going to school to become an elementary school teacher it’s astonishing in the happiness these kids get from playing with nothing. Very different to how children are raised here in the US. But great to know how there happiness can one day be restored since leaving.

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Ten Years After the Invasion of Iraq: The Human Cost

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of war can be staggering and far-reaching.  Often the costs are much higher than anticipated at the beginning.  Read this press release for more details on the recent findings regarding the actual costs of the Iraq War, which are estimated to have cost over 190,000 lives and $2.2 trillion. 


Tags: Iraq, conflict, K12, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:25 AM

The death of 190,000 people due to war is always a tragedy.  There is a positive side to this number, however.  The Iraq war cost 190,00 lives in ten years, an average of 19,000 deaths a year. In World War II, the Russians alone lost 9,000,000 people, in a much shorter amount of time.  We are no longer losing large chunks of our population in wars, due to new technology and combat strategies. 

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Refugees from Syria

Refugees from Syria | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The number of Syrian refugees who have fled the conflict and crossed the borders hasn't ceased to increase.
Seth Dixon's insight:

UNICEF workers have stated: "More than 600,000 have fled the conflict in Syria and registered as refugees. The number of Syrians who have left without registering is unknown but is likely to be hundreds of thousands. We do know, however, that children make up around half the number of refugees and that is certainly no way for any child to live their childhood."


Tags: Syria, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, October 30, 2013 5:16 PM

The ongoing military conflicts in Syria have caused a significant refugee problem. Refugees are evacuating Syria and entering its geographically close neighbors, including Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq, and Egypt.

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Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead

Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Eighteen months ago, central Mogadishu was like an African Stalingrad.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Somalia's political troubles are not over, but it is no longer the drought-ridden country overrun by Islamist extremist that it was two years ago.  For years it held the dubious title of "the world's most failed state."  Al Shabbab, the militant group linked to Al Qaeda, left the capital of Mogadishu in 2011 and in 2012 lost their last stronghold.  Piracy still exists off the Somali coast, but it has lessened as a semblance of political order is being restored to the Horn of Africa.

 

Tags: Somalia, Africa, political, conflict, war.

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Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:57 PM

Somalia has been the go-to criticism example for anarchy and lawlessness in my generation, but with the times our metaphors must also change. I'm interesting in seeing how Somalia gains control after a time of such factionalism.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:12 PM

This article describes the stabilizing political situation in Somalia. The country was long without a central government and the instability made Somalia a haven for Islamic extremists and piracy. In 2012, Somalia held successful elections and the new government, located in the Puntland region, has been taking territory from Al Shabaab and reducing piracy. The increasing stability could improve Somalia's economy as interest in its oil could see significant foreign investment into the former "failed state."

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:58 PM

Somalia, or as we referred to it last class "a country that is not really a country".  Somalia is famous for being a fractured, failing state.  The American war film, "Black Hawk Down" is set in Mogadishu and shows the country even in the 1990s fracturing apart under the influence of various warlords.  The movie was based on an actual event that occurred in the early nineties, in which the US tried to oust a large scale crime boss, supposedly to stabilize the nation, however this plan failed, as the nation continued to be fractured.  This article claims that there is progress being made in the country (Circa 2013) as the pro-"government" forces and a coalition for African security pushed back a terrorist group out of the capital and back to their stronghold in the country.  During 2012, the terrorist group lost its last stronghold.  However, Somalia still has a great deal of challenges facing it.  Al Shabbab is not fully eliminated, just weakened.  The pirates still exist on the Somalia coast, and trying to recreate a country out of something that hasn't existed as one for decades will be difficult.  However, I am pulling for the nation to succeed, the people in the region need stability.

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As Kurds Fight for Freedom in Syria, Fears Rise in Turkey

As Kurds Fight for Freedom in Syria, Fears Rise in Turkey of Following Suit
Seth Dixon's insight:

Since the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Kurds have been caught in other people's plans for what the states of the Middle East should look like and are the largest 'stateless nation' in the world.  Divided between Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey, the Kurds have not been able to politically mobilize support for Kurdistan as they have been violently oppressed in these countries.  The Kurds in Iraq have been able to gain political autonomy with the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime, and the Syrian Kurds are hoping to do the same if and when the Assad regime crumbles at the end of the civil war.  This make Turkey concerned that the Kurds in the southeastern part of Turkey will make renewed efforts to push for sovereignty. 


UPDATE: This PBS feature explains the historic timeline of the important political events for the Kurds in Iraq.This article from the Economist focuses on the key reason that outside forces won't leave the Kurds alone: oil.


Tags: Syria, ethnic, conflict, political, Turkey, culture, devolution.

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Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 28, 2012 6:34 AM

How to handle it?

 

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 1:15 PM

Since the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Kurds have been caught in other people's plans for what the states of the Middle East should look like and are the largest 'stateless nation' in the world.  Divided between Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey, the Kurds have not been able to politically mobilize support for Kurdistan as they have been violently oppressed in these countries.  The Kurds in Iraq have been able to gain political autonomy with the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime, and the Syrian Kurds are hoping to do the same if and when the Assad regime crumbles at the end of the civil war.  This make Turkey concerned that the Kurds in the southeastern part of Turkey will make renewed efforts to push for sovereignty. 


UPDATE: This PBS feature explains the historic timeline of the important political events for the Kurds in Iraq.This article from the Economist focuses on the key reason that outside forces won't leave the Kurds alone: oil.

 

Tags: Syria, ethnic, conflict, political, Turkey, culture, devolution.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:10 PM

what i find interesting about this is that both syria and turkey are trying to remove the kurds from their countries. neither country will allow more kurds to immigrate into their land, but both are encouraging them to leave and go fight in the other country. the kurds seem to not care which country they live in as long as they are all together but no country wants them.

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Human Conflict Seen From Space

Human Conflict Seen From Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it

I'll let Douglas Keeney's own words and this image speak for themselves: "The geography of human conflict as seen from space at night. The Strait of Hormuz as seen at night from the space station is a beautiful lesson in the geography of conflict. How much we learn by simply tracing the fingers of human populations as seen superimposed over the geography of Earth. Enjoy." 

-From Lights of Mankind: Earth at Night From Space


What would a picture look like from a drone's perspective?  Where are these places that are being targeted?  This Instagram account is incredibly thought-provoking and informative.

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 29, 2015 12:02 AM

Most likely, these lights represent urban areas which contains a higher population. As we can see in this photo, one territory stands out more not because of it's lights, but because we know that it is a higher population. Also we see urban areas that "never sleeps." What I mean by "never sleeps" is that the city functions late at night and still has people explore it 24/7.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 6:56 AM

The view from space is always life changing. The image underscores the conflict taking place in the region. Only from the sky, can use see the vastness of the conflict taking place. Television and film cameras can only capture so much of a war. Looking down from the sky gives us a better view of the overall devastation taking place. The Middle East is truly on fire.

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Israel - Gaza conflict

Israel - Gaza conflict | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Israeli airstrikes began November 14, following months of Palestinian rocket fire into Israel.


"Monday, the top leader of Hamas dared Israel to launch a ground invasion of Gaza and dismissed diplomatic efforts to broker a cease-fire in the six-day-old conflict, as the Israeli military conducted a new wave of deadly airstrikes which included a second hit on a 15-story building that houses media outlets."  This photo essay shows 34 powerful images that are emerging from this deadly conflict.  If students need some background to understand who are the major players in this conflict, this glossary should be helpful

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Wen Shi's curator insight, July 13, 2014 4:17 AM

I was so shocked while reading this ariticle and seeing those pictures. The conflict between the Palestinians and Israelis is something that is deeply rooted in the history of the two nations. And the war, resulted by this conflict, has taken away many people's lives. The 2 countries's people are suffering. Many kids are just at our ages, they could not get education or anything else that we take for granted here, even had to bear the pain of losing relatives and homes. I could never imagine how sad and disastrous wars can be. :(

Hossan Epiques Novelle's curator insight, July 13, 2014 4:58 AM

The two countries should take the chance to resolve the conflict amicably before the situation tips over and war is inevitable. The loss of lives resulting from the war would be pointless.

Zhiyang Liang's curator insight, July 13, 2014 12:02 PM

In my perspective, why does people will have a thought of eliminating prejudice is that prejudice can lead to unfair treatment or the violation of rights of individuals or groups of people just like the conflict between Israel and Gaza.