Geography Education
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World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.


For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry. But the dams blocked salmon migration up the Elwha, devastating its fish and shellfish—and the livelihood of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. As the tribe slowly gained political power—it won federal recognition in 1968—it and other tribes began to protest the loss of the fishing rights promised to them by federal treaty in the mid-1800s. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Washington tribes, including the Elwha Klallam, were entitled to half the salmon catch in the state.

Seth Dixon's insight:

See also this video to see the rapid changes on the nearby White Salmon River when they removed the dam. 


Tags: biogeography, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.

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Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."


Seth Dixon's insight:

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  Satellite imagery can help answer these questions. 


Tagsremote sensing, geospatial, images, sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture

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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 2014 12:09 PM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2014 5:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:44 PM

APHG-U2

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The Rise of Innovative Districts

"Today, innovation is taking place where people can come together, not in isolated spaces. Innovation districts are this century's productive geography, they are both competitive places and 'cool spaces' and they will transform your city and metropolis."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As described by the Brookings Institution in their exploration regarding innovation districts, they are geographic areas where leading-edge companies, research institutions, start-ups, and business incubators are located in dense proximity. These districts are created to facilitate new connections and ideas, speed up the commercialization of those ideas, and support urban economies by growing jobs in ways that leverage their distinct economic position.


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities, labor.

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Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World

Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the above poster the cities are arranged (roughly, in order to maximize space) by population. Clearly, size and population are not directly correlated. Some cities take up a lot more space for a smaller population. The relationship between the two, of course, is known as density (population density, urban density)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I shared this a while back, but the creator has since revised the data and updated the layout for the main infographic. The entire set of infographics are tremendous visual tools to compare urbanization patterns around the world. 

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:21 PM

Urban sprawl is a rising problem in the world due to the lack of control and its massive impact on the surrounding environment. These footprints show how unique each city's sprawl is. The surrounding environment is playing a huge role in where and how far each city extends. Chicago, for example, is limited on its eastern side due to Lake Erie's close proximity, and Cleveland is in a similar situation but on its north side where Lake Erie is. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:35 PM

The cities are organized (approximately) to population and shows the size of cities accordingly. The different sizes of cities and their correlating populations is thus revealed from urban places around the world. 

Urban regions stay rather functional and could be seem similar across the board, focusing on major economic activity and transportation.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:17 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

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The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. and CNN Money's list of the worst sprawl and a discussion of it's impacts.  


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:35 PM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:57 PM

Urban  Dynamics

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Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I've conducted research in Mexico City, and am endlessly fascinated but this urban amalgamation.  The city is so extensive that there are numerous morphological patterns that can be seen in the city, including the 12 listed in the article.  


Tags: Mexico, density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, October 6, 2015 1:18 PM
Even thought this article is more picture based it shows a interesting example of what Mexico City is all about and how it is laid out. With the different layouts it's just amazing how many different one there are. There are normal standard rectangle and square layouts. One was even built on a drained lake in order to expand the city and prevent the city from flooding. One picture has what looks like a maze of roads and an interesting convergence of where the roads meet up. Overall with so many different layouts it could get confusing to one who may not be from there.
Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:40 PM

While this scoop may reflect neighborhoods in Mexico, I feel like there is alot to be learned from it. The way human activity greatly affect the geographical landscape is undeniable in these photos. Areas were at one point a beautiful lake, trees and wild life inhabited, are now concrete jungles. In most of these images you cannot even see a patch of grass.

 I would be excited to see how specific neighborhood cultures develop considering the close proximity of people. I think that could be a really neat study. Is it like America in the early 1900's, segregation of religions, languages, and ethnic backgrounds? Or are the people close,  and friendly?

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 5:19 PM

It is interesting to see how Mexico City is set up, very busy, very populated, very tight. In the satellite photos of Mexico City, you can point out a few interesting things, like one being the different class of people. Some people have landscapes, while other people just have neighbors that live close enough to shake hands with through windows. Something like this goes to show who has money, who does not. You can definitely see grid type patterns in the way housing was built, it appears as if geometry took some play in the shape of the city. The one thing that caught my eye on the satellite map and I find very cool, is the red line of canopies from ambulantes (street vendors). 

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Maldives

Maldives | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Maldives is a small country in the Indian Ocean composed of 1,200 islands.  Virtually every spot in this country is under 8 feet in elevation.  Pictured above is the capital of Malé, which has the largest population (explore these islands on a variety of scales).   


Questions to Ponder: What physical forces and processes account for the presence of these islands in the Ocean?  In a geological time scale, what does the future hold for these islands.  What would be the main economic assets of the Maldives?  What would be the main economic and environmental concerns of this country?


Tags: density, sustainability, economicenvironment, environment adaptclimate change, urban ecology.

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:54 PM

The creation of the Maldives was a evolutionary process that was created with hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. However most of the 1200 or so islands are disappearing. As many of these islands have been created and built upon, the soils are losing their strength. Now we have a process of erosion not only from rain but also from the sea waves. As this eats away at the islands they are getting smaller and smaller and unless they start bringing in artificial land area they will someday disappear.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:39 PM

The Maldives Islands were created by Hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. Many of the one thousand islands that are there are slowly disappearing. The islands are being destroyed by rain and from sea waves that crash onto the island itself. Soon the land, just like Kiribati will disappear because they just keep shrinking in size more and more. Their economy revolves mostly around tourist money and parts of the islands have been highly developed for high end tourist marketing.  

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 4:33 AM

Honestly a nation like the Maldives would only be possible with today's technology. the lack of resources, land and linking landmass would have made it stuck in an era with villages at best. The modern country if you ask me is also a disaster waiting to happen. Their cities are right on sea level. A single tsunami or storm would devastate them never mind rising sea levels. I just think they are acting unsustainable and their growth without lack of native resources will lead to their nations ultimate failure. While I wish these people success their islands are also eroding due to reefs so geography is pretty much against them at every turn. In the future hopefully a solution to these problems can be found but until then this will likely be an area that will have to be evacuated in the future like many others.

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of infographics  is a tremendous visual tool to compare urbanization patterns around the world. 


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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What will you do?

What will you do? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world is in the palm of your hand; what will you do?  This is a question that each generation collectively needs to ask itself.  We can consider ourselves stewards of this planet with its vast natural resources and abundant potential.  If we make choices that are sustainable for the future we will keep many of these amazing possibilities open to future generations.  (For Hi-res image click here).  Just one more reason to read Geography Education.  


Tags: resources, sustainability.

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Hoàng Phương's comment, July 8, 2013 5:22 AM
My hand make all thing.
Susana Negrin's comment, July 8, 2013 1:17 PM
Excelente estrategia para visitar el blog que es muy interesante!!
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Managing Global Resources

Seth Dixon's insight:

How could this prompt (with accompanying activities and lesson plans) fit in with what you teach or study? 


Tags: consumption, food, development, resources, sustainability.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, April 10, 2013 6:34 PM

Useful for teh Fodd Security section which will be in the National Curriculum. The video provides an animated presentation of reasons for inequity in food availability over the globe. The activities on Oxfam site are useable resources.

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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This NPR article pulls together some great images of dense urban housing as well is some stellar infographics to show the importance of cities to a growing global population. 


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:12 PM

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:40 PM

cool

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 22, 2014 11:42 PM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes

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Top 10 Most Populated Cities In The World

Top 10 Most Populated Cities In The World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Urbanization has led to what are known as mega-cities, cities with a population of over 10 million people. These mega-cities have become so large that they often lead to terrible pollution, traffic, and extreme poverty.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Over half the global population lives in cities, and the problems confronting these megacities will loom large for future sustainability issues--both at local and global scales. This list ranks the cities by city limits and governance jurisdiction (not by the expanded metropolitan area).  


Tags: urban, megacities, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

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Erik Seglem's comment, March 15, 2013 11:22 AM
This is an interesting article, but it doesn't say how they came to their numbers. It seems like they may only be talking about within the 'city' limits, or some very old data. http://www.citypopulation.de/world/Agglomerations.html has some very different numbers as of the beginning of this year, their numbers however are the entire aggomeration and not just the 'city' limits.
Sally Egan's curator insight, March 18, 2013 7:17 PM

Over half the global population lives in cities, and the problems confronting these megacities will loom large for future sustainability issues--both at local and global scales. This list ranks the cities by city limits and governance jurisdiction (not by the expanded metropolitan area). 

 

 This is an interesting article, but it doesn't say how they came to their numbers. It seems like they may only be talking about within the 'city' limits, or some very old data. http://www.citypopulation.de/world/Agglomerations.html has some very different numbers as of the beginning of this year, their numbers however are the entire aggomeration and not just the 'city' limits.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

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Adaptive Roots in the Concrete Jungle

Adaptive Roots in the Concrete Jungle | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In this fantastic sighting by photographer Horst Kiechle, we see the roots of a tree in Bangkok, Thailand (Lat Yao, Chatuchak to be exact) growing into the grooves and cracks of an interlocking sidewalk. Even the colour of the roots gradually fade into the pavement."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This startling image is a powerful testament to the adaptive nature of many species to the urban environment.  Some species will adapt in beautiful ways such as this tree, while other will adapt in ways that go against our plan for that urban space (think rats, pigeons and cockroaches).  We adapt to our environment and the environment adapts to us as well; but that relationship is not always peaceful and symbiotic.  We can also destroy ecosystems that are fragile and not as resilient to change as this tree is.  See this same tree's root network one year later

 

Tags: urban ecology, environment adapt, sustainability, biogeography.

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'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply

'The Great Fish Swap': How America Is Downgrading Its Seafood Supply | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 


Tagsfood production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

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HazelAnne Prescott's curator insight, July 31, 2014 10:56 AM

Seems like a messed up system.  We do not have "taste"

Abigail Mack's curator insight, July 31, 2014 11:27 AM

What would make Americans opt for the lower quality, imported fish?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:45 PM

The United States exports the best-quality seafood that Americans catch, but import primarily low-grade aquacultural products.  This is just one of the counter-intuitive issues withe U.S. fish consumption and production.  This bizarre dynamic has cultural and economic explanations and this NPR podcast nicely explains these spatial patterns that are bound to frustrate those that advocate for locally sourced food productions. 

 

Tags: food production, industry, food, agriculture, agribusinessconsumptioneconomic, sustainability.

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As our cities have massively expanded in the last 70 years, so has the ecological footprint of these metropolitan areas.  This article discusses some of the challenges confronting megacities and their functions within the global urban network. 


Tags: sustainabilitydensity, megacities, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Solar Roadways

Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm sure a few of you have already seen this viral video and it should be intriguing to geographers for a variety of reasons (and not just because we love hexagons). Solar Roadways is a project in its infancy, but they have broad ambitions that would be revolutionary.  Roads that would produce energy?  The idea would have staggering results, but there are some practical reasons why this hasn't already been implemented.  A geographic perspective is critical as we plan for the future.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would the full implementation of this idea restructure the cultural landscape, urban environments and our cultural ecology?  What would some advantages be?  This video is a promotional video that emphasizes the positive; what drawbacks, limitations and obstacles are there to solar roadways in the future?  


Tags: transportation, technologyenergysustainability, planning, video.

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Gabriel Pizarro Dasso's curator insight, June 11, 2014 3:15 PM

creo que es al menos el mejor invento de diseño hasta hoy en día 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 13, 2014 9:26 AM

What an interesting idea. Power of the future?

Michelle Fulton's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:20 PM

Some really interesting discussions could be held around this video-Geographically, Scientifically, Technologically, Environmentally, Creatively and Critically. 

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Feeding 9 Billion

Feeding 9 Billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.    


Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture

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Sally Egan's curator insight, April 30, 2014 11:09 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.   

 

This article relates well to the Population topic in Global Challenges and issues that arise from the present growth patterns.  

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:59 PM

As population continues to grow and agricultural lands dissappear, the issue of feeding the world is becoming a growing concern.

The environmental places of the world are becoming arid and the agrarian places are dwindling affecting the human/environment interaction by introducing agricultural issues.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:52 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.    

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture. 

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Changing Earth

Changing Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video from National Geographic goes nicely with some of my recent posts about the dramatic changes that can be seen as some cities have exploded on the international scene.  The changes in metropolitan areas are dramatically presenting using satellite imagery in this great teaching video. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:29 PM

A great illustation of the changes to the environment as a result of increasing technology and population. Plays for 1minute 30.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:34 PM

A short but fascinating illustration of the rapid changes to areas of teh Earth, observed by astronauts since 2000. Plays for 1 minute 30.  

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 4, 2014 7:46 AM
This is a great resource for some of our science classes. It is an interesting presentation of the changes that we are making over time.
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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.


By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:03 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the long run, a successful farmer needs to find a balance between economic and environmental sustainability.  Some big farms are working towards that so the 'big-equals-bad' narrative about agriculture may be easy, but it doesn't tell the whole story about modern agriculture. 


Tags: GMOssustainability, agriculture, agribusiness

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:56 PM

In the long run, a successful farmer needs to find a balance between economic and environmental sustainability.  Some big farms are working towards that so the 'big-equals-bad' narrative about agriculture may be easy, but it doesn't tell the whole story about modern agriculture. 

 

Tags: GMOssustainability, agriculture, agribusiness

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Pollution is becoming ubiquitous in our urban environments.  If your primary concern is the environment, it is clear that this situation in Hong Kong must be changed.  But what if the environment is not the concern of policy makers?  What economic and planning arguments could you make in favor of a more sustainable course?


Tags: pollutionChina, development, economic, megacities, East Asia, industrysustainability, urban ecology.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:17 PM

Major cities in the world should take a deeper look into controlling pollution problems in their cities.  At some point, these places will no longer attract people to live in these areas, thus lowering the impact that these industries may have.  But as long as people are still living here by the millions and there is tourism, and buisness is booming, nothing will be done about the issue.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:08 PM

Summer reading KQ4: pollution, smog, megacity, sustainability

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:22 AM

Pollution is a huge issue facing both Hong Kong, and the rest of China in general. So far the government  has done little to actually combat the problem. The Chinese governments response has been to pretend that the problem does not really exist. A fake skyline can just erase the problem. In reality dealing with the pollution issue would actually help the Chinese economy. When people seek to go on a vacation, they are seeking a destination that is clean and safe. Who wants to visit a place were, you have to ware a mask to prevent the breathing in of armful chemicals. A cleaner less polluted china would lead to an expanded tourism industry.

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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Megacities are growing, especially in the developing world.  This rapid population growth leads to serious strains on many resources and the infrastructural capacities which leads to some dismal living conditions among the urban poor.  World Vision Australia works to assist and empower many of those without access to these important amenities.  Download the lesson as a PDF here


Tags: Indonesia, urban, megacities, sustainability, development.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:25 PM

It is nice to see an organization that is not just blindly giving resources to people in need but actually empowering them and training them to be able to get the things they need through work. The women in this story describe how they have learned to make and sell things in order to take care of their families and they describe how empowering that feels.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:11 AM

mega cities Jakarta

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 6:53 AM

Megacities are beginning to populate the entire globe. In the developing world, more and more megacities are beginning to form. Jakarta Indonesia is an example of a rising megacity. This rapid urbanization has placed a special burden on the resources and local economies of many developing nations. This areas are not prepared to deal with the rapid population growth associated with the development of a megacity. This strain placed on the local areas, will often lead to terrible living conditions for the lower classes of society. Sanitation will often become a major issue in many of these megacities. Large portions of the population will often lack a proper sanitation system. The lack of proper sanitation will lead to the onset of deadly diseases. The effects of rapid urbanization can be deadly, for those living in the pooper regions of society.

Suggested by Brett Sinica
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6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You

6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From the food we eat to the energy, transportation, and water we all need, a warmer world will bring big changes for everyone.

 

B Sinica: This article touches every aspect of geography from culture to climate [considering] how the growing population plays the biggest role in determining the future of life on Earth.  People need to recognize the problems and potential future issues with global warming and the rapidly changing environment.  Though not many issues can be prevented or even solved, the least we can do is try to lessen the severity of devastation and prolong the current conditions as much as possible before the world becomes too extreme to manage.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some tangible ways that climate change can impact us in the future:

  • Food Security
  • Energy consumption
  • Extreme Weather
  • Drought
  • Health risks (more air-born diseases)
  • Vulnerable urban ecologies


Tags: climate change, environment, environment adapt, sustainability. National Geographic.

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Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:22 PM
It is kind of a scary thought that global warming could greatly disrupt the way we live. Everyone is affected by it especially businesses like farms. The production of crops declines because of the excessive heat. Changing climate affect the length of each season which hurts the process of growing and harvesting crops. There would also be a change in the production, storage and transportation. It will cost more money to properly manage these businesses. This change will not only affect companies and how we handle our food but also our way of life and health. We would all have to adapt to such drastic changes in the environment which may be a struggle for some. Health wise, if it is too hot and people are not well adapted then it could lead to hospitalization and increased health risks. I don’t think there is much we can do to lessen the severity because it is a natural cycle of earth. I do think we may have sped up the process a little bit, for example car exhaustion and greenhouse gasses. But we are so dependent on such technology we can’t just make it disappear.
Dillon Cartwright's comment, May 3, 2013 4:04 PM
It's crazy that something like a little climate change can change the affect the entire world. Not just in one way either, it affects the world in many ways, like the 6 mentioned above. I don't think people realize the frailty of the environment they live in. Something as small as someones car exhaust becomes kind of a big deal when there are hundreds of millions of cars in the world.
In addition to that, I think it's great that life expectancy has gone up with cures to diseases and advances in modern medicine. It's a good thing that people are living longer lives, but it's a problem when these people aren't environmentally conscious. If there is going to be a consistent increase in population, there should also be an increase in environmental awareness so everyone can work together in slowing down this destructive process.
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:03 PM

Climate change is going to affect how we live in the future. It will cause lack of food, energy sources, health risks, climate changes, drought etc. It is because of our growing population and the amount of people the world has to take care of for all of us to survive. We are also using too many of its resources too quickly. What could we do now to try to slow down the process of it happening? 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs

From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Guinea pigs are popular pets in the U.S., but in parts of South America, they're a delicacy. Some environmental and humanitarian groups are making a real push to encourage guinea pig farming as an eco-friendly alternative to beef.
Seth Dixon's insight:

First off, my apologies if you find the image distressing (I have two guinea pigs in my house and I will not be showing this picture to my children). However, the fact that many readers might find this image disturbing but wouldn't think twice about the sight of chicken grilling on the barbeque highlights the cultural taboos surrounding what we consider appropriate food sources.  The tradition has diffused to the United States as more South American immigrants have come to the United States.  While the meat is more environmentally sustainable (less resources are required to raise one pound of guinea pig meat than one pound of beef), many potential costumers are leery to eat something that they consider a pet.


Tags: food, diffusion, sustainability.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 9:21 PM

I can  see both sides of this, I would never eat a guinea pig because I grew up viewing them as pets. I think people are brought up a certain way and even when they move they take their customs with them.  I have a friend from china and lived there until he was 14 yrs old, he  had told me the city he was from they ate dog and cats. they view it as meat were we think of them as pets. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 2014 10:26 PM

This article is interesting because it is taking into consideration the ecological benefits of eating what we consider unorthodox meats. Raising guinea pigs for food would apparently leave a substantially smaller carbon footprint over a large, high waste producing animal like cows. Culturally, in South America guinea pigs are considered a delicacy, but I can't see culture changing in the United States to the point where we would give up hamburgers for grilled guinea pig.

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Envisioning the urban skyscraper of 2050

Envisioning the urban skyscraper of 2050 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Envisioning the urban skyscraper of 2050
Ars Technica
The Internet of Things will be ubiquitous, Arup suggests; presumably to the point that it has been abbreviated simply to "things," the "Internet of" having been long since forgotten.
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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, February 24, 2013 12:50 AM

Is this the future for the sustainable urban area? Can this be overlaid on our exisiting urban areas? Does it only have relevance in new Ecocities?