Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day

Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Last year, Julie and I wrote this article for Maps 101 (which was also created into a podcast) about the historical and geographic significance of Dr. Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights movement.  Martin Luther King fought racial segregation, which, if you think about it, is a geographic system of oppression that uses space and place to control populations. Derek Alderman and Jerry Mitchell, excellent educators and researchers, produced lesson plans to help students investigate the politics behind place naming, specifically using the case study of the many streets named after Martin Luther King.  


Questions to Ponder: Why are streets named after Martin Luther King found in certain places and not in others? What forces and decisions likely drive these patterns? What is the historical legacy of Martin Luther King and how is it a part of certain cultural landscapes? 


Tags: seasonal, race, historical, the South, political, toponyms, landscape.

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Kendra King's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:01 PM

Interesting and different way to view MLK.

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Remembering the Real Violence in Ferguson

Remembering the Real Violence in Ferguson | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Violence has a geography and for this reason, geography lies at the center of discussions of violence. Within the United States a myriad of taken for granted assumptions about identity, place, power, and memory undergird the nation’s psyche.  These normative interpretations intersect with a particular kind of geographic formulation that places persons of color in general, but black men most specifically, at the center of the violent structures of the nation."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This isn't merely commentary about social upheaval or some musing about the social inequities (I think we've all read a ton of those articles).  This is a geographic analysis that discusses the interactions, interconnections and implications of a social and spatial conflict between citizens and the institutions of the state.  Ferguson, MO is undoubtedly a lightning rod today and some might prefer to avoid discussing it in a classroom setting; I find that as long as we put analysis before ideology, issues such as these show students the relevance and importance of geographic principles to their lives. 


Tags: race, class, gender, place, poverty, socioeconomic.

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Rob Duke's comment, September 19, 2014 12:58 AM
Seth, yes, couldn't agree more. I think this is a great example where our fields can be complementary in theory and the tools we use.
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Fair Housing

Fair Housing | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week's show, stories about destiny by address.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This hour-long podcast addresses some has key issues in urban geography by exploring the history of redlining, the Fair Housing Act and other fair housing initiatives.  The urban cultural mosaic of the United States and the neighborhoods of our cities have been greatly shaped by these issues.   Currently gentrification is reshaping many U.S. cities and fits into the wider scope of the issues raised in the podcast.


Tags: housingracism, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood, ethnicity, race, podcast.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 3:54 AM

this podcast can gives us insight into other peoples experiences and decision making processes in choosing were to live and how that effects life for them. Depending on where we live rent may be cheaper but also living conditions and employment may not be all that great. Gentrification or community improvement also shows us, this renovating process helps change our old neighborhoods and tries to create better places for people to life, it speaks about fair housing and the various experiences that people have in the American way of living.

Mrs. B's curator insight, December 3, 2013 8:44 PM

PODCAST FOR URBAN UNIT

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Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly gorgeous interactive map of population density in the United States.  It is very reminiscent of this North American Map with two major differences.  On the down side, Mexican and Canadian data are not displayed but on the bright side, the added color component is used to show ethnic categories as defined by the 2010 U.S. census.  Please explore this map at a variety of scales and in distinct locales.   


Questions to Ponder: Is this a map of ethnic diversity patterns or is it a map of racial segregation?  How come?  Is there additional information that you would need to decide?  This review of the map on Wired and Atlantic Cities described this map as a map depicting segregation: why would they say that? 


Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, population, density, ethnicity, race.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:52 AM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:27 PM

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 2014 12:30 PM

The Wired article's claim that this map depicts racial segregation instead of ethnic diversity can be seen in the patterns found in most of the major cities. While cities like Los Angeles and Las Vegas have many mixed areas containing different colored dots, other cities like Dallas and Atlanta show very clear cut lines between the ethnic makeup of areas. When zoomed out, the map certainly looks segregated with areas clearly marked blue, green, or yellow.

 

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Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In April, the Associated Press decided the word 'illegal' should only be used to describe actions, not people. It's one of several major news outlets that have been reconsidering how to refer to people who are in this country illegally."  


Seth Dixon's insight:

There is power in the words we choose, especially for those those that are in the media that influence the way we frame any topic.  If a reporter in a news article, for example, were to describe a group as freedom fighters instead of insurgent rebels it impacts our perception of the news. See also this gallery of images on the U.S.-Mexico border


Tagsmigrationethnicity, race, population, podcast.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 21, 2013 12:53 PM
It all goes along with the old saying, the victors write the history books. If the US lost the American Revolution it wouodl probably been called the American Insurrection. Also look at the Civil War as we mostly call it today. Many places, especially in the Southern states call this the War for Southern Independence or the War of Norther Aggression.
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:19 PM

I thought that NPR broadcast  was perpetuating the problem we face today in news media.  They spent there time talking about certain individuals and how they used their words instead of addressing and informing us about the issue of immigration. Labeling is an easy way of separating a human being from the situation, Illegal immigrant is easier to portray negatively in the news.  An illegal sounds better then a disadvantaged Mexican refuge in search of the same American dream our founding fathers were trying to create when the agenda is to close the boarders

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 8:16 PM

It is interesting to see that not only the topic of Immigration is controversial,  but the terms being used for that topic is also a sensitive subject.

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Martin Luther King-Then and Today

I Have a Dream Speech Martin Luther King's Address at March on Washington August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring fro...
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is much to glean from Martin Luther King's famous I Have a Dream speech as a fantastic rhetorical device. This speech has a profound impact on the the psyche of the America culture and it has endured as a pivotal moment in history.  As we celebrate his life and legacy this Monday, it is an appropriate time to contemplate that the ending of segregation (a spatial division of races) has reshaped the United States. 


Many streets in the United States bear the name "Martin Luther King Jr." to memorialize both the man and the Civil Rights movement.  This streets, as this YouTube video suggests, are often in poor, crime-ridden and violent neighborhoods.  This video highlights the irony between the historical memory of Martin Luther King Jr. and places of memorialization that bear his name.  This video echoes much of what the authors of the fantastic book "Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory" say (in fact one of the authors is shown in this video). 


Questions to ponder: If Martin Luther King Jr. represents non-violence, then why are streets bearing his name often in 'violent' neighborhoods?  Where should Martin Luther King be memorialized in the United States?  Only in the South?  Only in predominantly African-American communities?  What does the geography of the spaces where he is memorialized say something about the United States?    

 

Tags: historical, culture, landscape, place, race, unit 3 culture, USA, urban, poverty, unit 7 cities, book review

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, January 20, 2013 10:38 AM

Teachers:  How great would it be to use the actual speech?  Can you say, "primary source?"  Here's an idea:  Print it out and let students close read this important speech, too.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:56 PM

Probably they think that martin Luther king is more important to African American, then the rest of the United States population, but I personally feel that martin Luther king, represent a changing America also he is a very important figure in American history, he should be place in a better location so people that come to visit united states could venerate him as a man who fought for not only for African American but also for every minorities living in the United States.

Norman Chan's curator insight, July 12, 2014 7:50 PM

After watching his speech, I feel that he really worked hard fighting for the African Americans. He must have been really brave to step up and fight for the African American. If there was someone like him at this date, I feel that racism would greatly decreased as many would be inspired one his/her words.

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Tanzania's Albinos Face Constant Threat Of Attack

For many albinos — born with a partial or total lack of pigment in their skin, hair and eyes — life is difficult, and that is particularly true in Tanzania, where they are attacked for their flesh, the result of superstitious beliefs.


Seth Dixon's insight:


This is not a typical look at the cultural roots of prejudice and discrimination.  It isn't racism per se (since albinism isn't a racial category strictly speaking), but it does show prejudice that is linked to physical appearance and skin color.  There are deeply rooted folk traditions that endanger the lives of African albinos as explained in this podcast.  This photo gallery shows some of Tanzania's albinos letting their light shine.   

 

Tags: culture, racism, folk culture, Tanzania, Africa.

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Un-Fair Campaign

Un-Fair Campaign | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The University of Wisconsin-Superior is in one of the least ethnically diverse regions of the United States and the university is partnering with other local organizations across that region aimed at highlighting structural advantages within society for Caucasians.  This campaign to make 'white privilege' visible has not surprisingly generated controversy and has made race and its impact of society an issue quite visible, to the discomfort of many.   The author of the book, "Colorblind," speaks about this issue on PBS as he argues that the United States is not in a post-racial society

Questions to Ponder:  In what tangible ways can you see 'white privilege' in our society?  Is this ad campaign a good idea?  What does the term normativity mean and how does it relate to this topic? 

Tags: race, racism, culture, unit 3 culture, book review and ethnicity.

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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 4, 2012 11:56 AM
I believe this campaign is being made aware in the Wisconsin area of the U.S. because the population is primarily white. Therefore, this region may be trying to make its people aware of the fact that racism can still exist even though this region may be ignorant to this issue. And this region is not to blame for its ignorance because a vast, non-diverse racial community is all they are exposed to, and all they know.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 4, 2012 9:29 PM
I think some people feel that pointing out institutionalized bias feels as though the campaign is blaming them for simply being white. I had a special blue ticket to go to the front of the DMV line today and I was thrilled but it made me think about the others still waiting. There's an analogy in there but I don't want to force it.
steffiquah's curator insight, July 16, 2014 7:25 AM

There is no logic as to why whites should be treated better than the blacks. It is society being biased and we could make a difference. A colour shouldn't define a person's personality, fate, or future. We should not be biased towards them but instead, give them fair and equal opportunities as any other people. I personally do not think racism should be a problem in the first place. What makes them discriminate blacks and make them lower than the whites in the first place? I hope something can be done about this.

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Racial Diversity Increases, But Segregation Persists

U.S. census data shows racial diversity is increasing in major cities across the United States. But highly diverse neighborhoods are still rare, newly arrive...

 

I've read within the last few months articles mentioning that segregation in inner city neighborhood are on the rise, and other headlines stating that ethnic diversity within urban areas is at an all-time high.  My first reaction was, "so which is it?"  This research shows how to make sense of both of these trends which seem contradictory.  For more context on this issue, see: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/neighborhoods/2012/06/watch-these-us-cities-segregate-even-they-diversify/2346/

 

For a segregation at all time low article, see: http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/1145693870/segregation-hits-historic-low

For the link to 'segregation is still rampant,' see: http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/1103106026/reports-of-the-end-of-segregation-greatly-exaggerated

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Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still Divided

Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still Divided | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Twenty years ago this week, the Bosnian war began with the siege of Sarajevo, the longest in the history of modern warfare. The siege ended more than three years later, leaving 100,000 dead — the worst atrocities in Europe since World War II.

 

Ethnic and political conflict led to the disintegration of Yugoslavia in the 1990s.  This NPR podcast is a good recap that shows the devolutionary forces of ethnic, religious, cultural and political differences that led to tragic violence and ethnic cleansing. 

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Devon marzo's curator insight, February 6, 2014 12:37 PM

This article show political because the population is protesting against the government 

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 17, 2015 9:36 PM

It's interesting to see a country's government want to maintain ethnic divides rather than bridge the gap between the two groups. This reminds me of a portion of my Anthropology class last semester on the Rwandan Genocide. Afterwards, the new government attempted to bring everyone together and tried to erase the racial differences that caused the conflict in the first place. It did this in an attempt to solidify power and to gain further control. In my mind, I see this reaction as the more logical one than keeping the races at odds with each other. Judging by their own smaller "Occupy" movement and from the commentary within the article, it seems that some in the country are ready to put past old feelings and become united as a country.

Peyton Conner's curator insight, April 8, 2016 9:45 AM
I find this article very interesting due to the reason that after all the fighting and killing that has happened between these three ethnic groups, that they now want to team up to stop their corrupt government. Though the question is can they put their differences aside to work together ? PC
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We Need to Talk About an Injustice

TED Talks In an engaging and personal talk -- with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks -- human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America's justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial...

 

The Trayvon Martin shooting has been a very polarizing social issue; many athletes, actors and even politicians have donned hoodies in solidarity to speak out against racial and social injustice.  This is a good opportunity to discuss race in the classroom, beyond the Trayvon Martin incident.  I find this particular TED Talk heartwarming (and fairly non-controversial although he hintsstrongly that he is against the death penalty), while still casting the light on injustices in the United States, specifically looking at the racial differences within the criminal justice system.      

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Segregation Hits Historic Low

Segregation Hits Historic Low | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An exodus of African-Americans from struggling industrial cities such as Detroit and the growth of Sunbelt states have pushed racial segregation in U.S. metropolitan areas to its lowest level in a century, according to a new study.

 

Fifty years ago, nearly half the black population lived in a ghetto, the study said, while today that proportion has shrunk to 20%. All-white neighborhoods in U.S. cities are effectively extinct, according to the report.  While the urban geography of North America is not post-racial, many of the glaringly institutionalized problems (e.g.-redlining) have lessened.  

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 2:11 PM

This article shows how immigration and gentrification have helped convert ghettos into racially mixed communities. Segregation based on race is declining but segregation still exist but based on class and income. The rich are divided from the poor, in the 1950s race and income went together. The demographics of rich and poor are changing. In the early and mid 20th century rural blacks moved to urban centers for work and the population of minorities in the inner city boomed. As gentrification occurs, those populations are being pushed out and it is lowing the amounts of segregation. In North America, economic geography is effecting population geography. 

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Reports Of The End Of Segregation Greatly Exaggerated

Reports Of The End Of Segregation Greatly Exaggerated | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Manhattan Institute just released a new study by economists Ed Glaeser and Jacob Vigdor called 'The End of the Segregated Century.' It cheerfully notes that segregation is at its lowest level since 1910 and that all-white neighborhoods 'are virtually extinct.'

 

Their report seems accurate enough in describing the changes and is consistent, in many respects, with other research. Yet, in focusing exclusively on change, the report fails to convey that segregation is still quite high throughout much of America. Moreover, the summary and discussion are misleading in their insinuation that “the end of segregation” has failed as a 'driving force' behind increasing socio-economic equality between races."

 

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Map shows how race is a social construct

Map shows how race is a social construct | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Americans' understanding of who counts as 'white' has changed dramatically throughout the country's history and even over the last century alone. This map — which covers a decade of immigration to the US, from 1892 to 1903 — is a dramatic illustration of what it looked like when 'white' wasn't the same thing as European.  Mouse over any part of the map to magnify it."


Tags: race, historical, USA, map.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, November 9, 2014 3:23 PM

And a political construct, too ...

Caterin Victor's curator insight, November 10, 2014 8:43 AM

 Up to me, race and colour don`t matter. Most important is the personality. America have now a black President. Is it better??

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Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day

Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once stated,"A man who won't die for something is not fit to live." Arrested over twenty times, stabbed in the chest, his house firebombed and, ultimately shot and killed, King embodied the idea that equality and the African American Civil Rights Movement were worth dying for.He was a husband and father to four children as persecution and death threats filled his days, yet his example was one of nonviolent, civil disobedience.Had he not been assassinated, King would have celebrated his 85th birthday on January 15th."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Dr. Martin Luther King fought racial segregation (which, if you think about it, is a geographic system of oppression that uses space and place to control populations).  Dr. King has been described as a critical geographer for some of his insights.  In 1967, MLK stated, "The expansion of suburbia and migration from the South has worsened big-city segregation.  The suburbs are a white noose around the black necks of cities… suburbs expand with little regard for what happens to the rest of America.”  If you are a Maps 101 subscriber, please read the rest of this article that I co-authored with Julie Dixon.  You can also sign up for a free trial subscription or listen to the article as a free podcast on Stitcher Radio.  

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:16 PM

Martin Luther King Jr. is an iconic figure in American history. A man that will be remembered forever, as he overcame so much adversity and risked his life on a daily basis for the greater good of America. After being arrested multiple times, injured and threatened, most people would have given up, but not him. He is one who never gave up on his dreams and proves that anything is possible.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:27 PM

We celebrate Martin Luther King JR because he was a man of pride. In history, those who are remembered did something great most likely. He was an activist for the Civil Rights movement and had a dream that one day the world would treat everyone as equals. He was assassinated and unfortunately that is another reason we celebrate and honor his life.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:40 PM

This article wouldn't open when I clicked on it. It said I had to sign into some website that I have never used so I couldn't access this article. So I'm basically winging this one and making it an opinion scoop. I think that celebrating Martin Luther King Day is very important. Not only did he do all he could to make the blacks be treated equally, but he went through hell trying to do it. He was tortured by people in the town and his house was even set on fire. This is just as important as the Rosa Parks incident and the Brown V.S. Board of Education. We celebrate this day to remind us about how he died trying to set things right and have everyone be treated equally. We also celebrate this day to continue his love and peace in this world. Because of Martin Luther King Jr., we now can all live, work, and be a part of the same community, whether you are black or white.

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Portland: A Tale of Two Cities

Portland: A Tale of Two Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Portland is a city that some residents praise as a kind of eden: full of bike paths, independently-owned small businesses, great public transportation and abundant microbreweries and coffeeshops. And then there’s a whole other city. It’s the city where whole stretches of busy road are missing sidewalks, and you can see folks in wheelchairs rolling themselves down the street right next to traffic. It’s the city where some longtime African-American residents feel as if decades of institutional racism still have not been fully addressed."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Portland, Oregon is often discussed as a magnet for a young demographic that wants to be part of a sustainable city that supports local businesses and agriculture.  This podcast looks behind that image (which has a measure of truth to it) to see another story.  Relining, gentrification, poverty, governance and urban planning are all prominent topics in this 50 minute podcast that provides as fascinating glimpse into the poorer neighborhoods of this intriguing West Coast city.  When in cities, we often use the term sustainability to refer to the urban ecology, but here we see a strong concern for the social sustainability of their historic neighborhoods as well. 


Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic, racepovertyplace, socioeconomic.

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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 1:21 PM

Recently I came across a craigslist post from a gentleman who was trying to rally individuals to Portland with him for a journey on the "Michigan Trail" to Detroit. He made promise that the intention was to perform rejuvinating work in  Detroit alongside it's current residents and that there would be "no gentrification." 

Not that I found these statements or intentions to be profound or useful in anyway, but this podcast really put a nail in the coffin for me. The effects of gentrification are well known for both their positive and negative aspects. But the bottom line is this, regardless of intention the poor and diverse populations will be displaced unless it is from them that this renaissance takes place. Not Portlandia hipsters looking for some sort of "promise land."  

Portland apparentely has it's own issues with gentrification and a class of social and cultural norms that make it difficult to make the case for cities on the rise to take the same path.  

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:12 PM

I don't think that Earth offers everything for everyone.  Given the situation of predetermination about birthplace and essentially upbringing, social class, and outcomes, in an infinite universe (infinite until proven otherwise), a single small planet cannot possibly offer us everything we are destined to need in the universe, let alone the towns that we are limited to.  I do not believe in choice, I believe in destiny... I do not blame people for racism or crimes, as HORRIBLE as they may be. I think that people are made into what they are by the world around them, in existential and defining ways.  Yeah, there is plenty of room for improvement and change in Oregon, but realistically, there is also more room for improvement in other areas too.  I don't really see humans as the sort of people that will ever get better without some sort of divine intervention.  I am taking the perspective of separation of paradise and purgatory that was mentioned in this article, and applying it to a different scale, but I do believe that mankind is to be condemned by the universe, due to its faults and inability to play well with others.  The world freaks out when kidnapping victims are found after a decade of abuse and captivity, but this same world breeds animals for slaughter and consumption... Earthlings clearly have been taught to not care about those that are different, whether in looks or species... I think the kidnapping situation is vile and appalling, but I also think that breeding species for slaughter (which affects more living beings) is democratically more of an issue.

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Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'?

Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"American tragedies occur where middle America frequents every day: airplanes, business offices, marathons. Where there persists a tangible fear that this could happen to any of us. And rightfully so. Deaths and mayhem anywhere are tragic. That should always be the case. The story here is where American tragedies don't occur. American tragedies don't occur on the southside of Chicago or the New Orleans 9th Ward."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a controversial Op-Ed article that discusses how place and the major axes of identity (race, class and gender) shape and intersect with the the national memory of violence and the media portrayal of violence.  According the David Dennis, "The media seems to forget about New Orleans and any place that the middle class can't easily relate to." 


Tags: race, class, gender, place.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 7:09 PM

It is truly amazing how much location has an impact on society and the way we view things. When we experienced such tragedy's as the Boston Marathon bombing or Columbine it was national news. The city was in an uproar and no matter what radio station you had on or what tv channel you were watching you were hearing about it. Everyone was mourning for those families and people effected by the tragedies. When you think about it, those sort of things are not expected to happen in those places which is what makes it so upsetting to people. Because it is not expected to happen there it becomes national news. However what does that mean about places like compton, New Orleans, and etc? Since people expect violent things to happen there it doesn't make national news because it is of no surpise to anyone that something like that were to happen there. Even if it is expected that doesn't make it right. The shooting at the mother's day parade should be treated like any other tragedy. Unfortunately the location of the tragedy makes it "less" of a tragedy in the eyes on the public because "those sort of things always happen there". It is amazing how much our perception of location can taint the way we see tragedy. It shouldn't be that way, but unfortunetly it's what happens in the world today. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:44 AM
New Orleans has been struggling even through Katrina to get some recognition that even though their society is not necessarily rich they deserve the same respect as anyone else would. To think especially after what New England endured with the Marathon Bombing to see something like this happen and not even really be recognized nationally is sad. These are people just like everyone else and they deserve to be treated the same as everyone else.
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Teaching about Racism in Japan

Is there racism and discrimination in Japan? I was surprised to find out that almost all of my high school students (about 1000 students) were not aware of t...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This YouTube video has caused a tremendous amount of controversy in Japan, where most see discrimination as a problem in other societies.  For some more context on the controversy, read this great Washington Post article on the subject.    

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Nathan Soh's curator insight, July 13, 2014 6:55 AM

I feel that racism and discrimination is a very redundant thing and not many people know about its existence in their own country. Be it against Koreans, or blacks, it is still a problem. It enrages me when i think of being discriminated just because i am different. It just isn't fair. 

huang junyi's curator insight, July 13, 2014 8:19 AM

After watching this video, I realised that many Japanese people were oblivious about their country's racist nature. I think it is because the Japanese government had censored most of racist issues thus,  Compared to the Germans I don’t think the Japanese sense of racial superiority is that specific. There is a sense of Japan’s superiority politically speaking. I think the sense of Japan’s superiority fundamentally comes from the fact that Japan is a unique country because of its emperor system, it’s a divine country, that kind of thing. That is why Japanese dislike foreigners coming to their country as they are afraid that foreigners might ruined their traditional ways and culture. The Japanese people want to preserve their culture very badly. In another words, I dare to say that Japanese people are rigid and narrow-minded, I think ten years down the road if japan is still like that, it's economy will go down hill. 

Emily Lai Yin's curator insight, July 13, 2014 9:57 AM

It first surprised me to know that students in Japan are not aware of racism and discrimination in their own country. but I came to realised that they were most probably influenced by the older generation when they were young. such discrimination to people with different races and origins such as Koreans, Okinawans and burakumins are quite severe and for most students to not realise it must mean that they were mostly likely raised in a way that they were being taught to discriminate people for their origins naturally. this situation certainly needs to be changed as the discrimination will only get from ad to worse as time passes if nothing is done to stop this "natural discrimination".

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Aborigines threaten to shut Uluru

Aborigines threaten to shut Uluru | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Aboriginal leaders threaten to ban tourists from a top Australian landmark in protest at "racist" government policies.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an old article, but a fascinating topic that cuts across many geographic issues.  Uluru, the landform that that European explorers named Ayers Rock, was the key place that is at the center of a struggle between indigenous people and the government.  Many feel that the government's course of action in the mid 2000's was paternalistic and racist.  They banned alcohol and pornography in over 70 indigenous communities in an attempt to lower the rates of child sex abuse.  Sex Abuse is high (and often hidden)  in aboriginal communities where a child is 7 times more likely to be abused than in the rest of the Australian population.


Questions to Ponder: Would the government impose such measures on other populations within Australia?  When crimes have a racial component, does a government have the right to limit a particular groups' actions?  Why or why not?

 

Tags: Australia, indigenous, ethnicity, race, Oceania.

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:38 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, this article is about Aborigines in Australia protesting "racist" government policies. It sounds like the Australian version of what would happen if America's Native Americans teamed up with a racial oppression organization. They are apparently threatening to shut down the most famous landmark in Australia to visitors if the government doesn't change it's position. I don't blame them, fight the power!!

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:08 PM

the government punishing a whole culture for crimes is outrageous. Not all are guilty but all are punished. it is proven fact that more minorities in this country are incarcerated for drug usage than whites but that doesn't mean you jail all black people. The government is being racist because the aboriginal are poverty stricken group who do not contribute to society, they only have a population of 300,000 people. In the governments eyes they just exist on the land and do nothing for the economy. Well it must have some influence because they are protesting by not allowing tourists climb Uluru or Ayers rock. I guess the government will not be collecting permit fees or other fees associated with the climbing of the rock. Tourism should take a hit from hotel accomendations  to hiking tour guides to purchasing gear etc...

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:22 PM

Australia has always had troubles dealing with their past actions against the native population of their island, and this will hopefully be a wake up call on the policies they have taken.

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Martin Luther King Street

A teaser trailer for the MLK Streets Project, a documentary film examining the state of the many avenues, boulevards and thoroughfares named after the slain ...


This video echoes much of what the authors of the fantastic book "Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory" say (in fact one of the authors is shown in this video).  Throughout America, streets that are named after Martin Luther King Jr. frequently are in poor, crime-ridden neighborhoods.  This video highlights the irony between the historical memory of Martin Luther King Jr. and places of memorialization that bear his name.   


Questions to ponder: If Matin Luther King Jr. represents non-violence, then why are streets bearing his name often in 'violent' neighborhoods?  Where should Martin Luther King be memorialized in the United States?  Only in the South?  Only in predominantly African-American communities?  Do the geography of the spaces where he is memorialized say something about the United States?    

 

Tags: historical, culture, landscape, place, race, unit 3 culture, USA, urban, poverty, unit 7 cities, book review

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melissa stjean's comment, October 8, 2012 9:49 PM
These streets are the most popular in the country, but they are located mostly located in areas with profoundly poorer incomes. With poorer incomes, leads to increased crime rates, does naming a street after an iconic hero please the people who live here? It seems like the geography of these places is creating a line of segregation by using his name for a street.
Jeff F's comment, October 8, 2012 10:42 PM
Martin Luther King Streets are places into prominently African-American neighborhoods because that is where the dominant white culture says they belong. Martin Luther King jr was a powerful African-American man and a powerful African-American man has no place in white communities according to this philosophy. If a MLK street was to be placed into a white suburb it would likely cause controversy. Cries of myths such as "reverse racism" would likely run rampant. This would be accompanied with the idea that a MLK street should only belong in an area with a heavy African-American population.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:49 PM
I think Martin Luther King should be memorialized in all parts of the country, and why not with all cultures and races. He did stand for non-violence and non-discrimination, which happens among all types of people.
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Gentrification in Providence

Gentrification in Providence | Geography Education | Scoop.it

KV: Development of a high end apartment complex in a low income area would force pre-gentrification people out of the neighborhood. The taxes would get raised to amounts that make it difficult for these people to afford. However, the people in charge of this project are ignoring the consequences and focusing on the 5 million dollars tax break. 

 

SD: This sign went up in to 2006 protest the mills-to-condo developments in Providence, Rhode Island.  Click here to see the photographer's work

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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:41 AM
Gentrification has both positive and negative affects on the city. I believe that it is beneficial for a city to take older buildings and utilize them or flip them into malls or financially beneficial businesses for their economy. But on the other hand you are taking people who were living in these areas with low rent and after you flip these buildings the rent is going to rise substancially. Therefore these former residents cannot afford to stay in the apartments and have to relocate their homes. Its hard to pick a side.
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Ghosts Of Rwanda

This chilling documentary outlines the historical genocide of Tutsi people predominantly by Hutu's in Rwanda during 1994. So often, students who have always lived within a society with effective political institutions are unable to see how such atrocities could even happen. This video lays the groundwork for understanding the disintegration of political institution within Rwanda, reasons the international community underestimated the threat, why the UN in 1994 (after Somalia) was not prepared to use forceful action and why westerners fled. In this state of lawlessness, the cultural tensions and colonial legacy lead to horrific killings. This genocide has no one reason, but a complex set of geographic contexts. This would be a powerful video to show students. WARNING: considering the content, there are necessarily depictions of death.  To learn more about the documentary, see: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/ghosts/

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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 31, 2012 12:30 PM
In this situation I look at America and I can't help but ask "Why didn't you help?" These people were getting killed for no good reason, and we as a nation knew this and did nothing. I'm ashamed that we didn't aid them, my heart goes out for the Rwandan people.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:08 PM

while watching this video i was reminded of the very good film Hotel Rwanda, starring Don Cheadle.  The only difference is while Hotel Rwanda is based on a ture story, this is a real life look at what was hapening in this area.  It was sad to see hwat was happening and all I could wonder was why no one decided to hel pthem. 

Rescooped by Seth Dixon from History and Social Studies Education
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Congressman Bobby Rush Kicked Off House Floor For Wearing Hoodie

http://www.thegreatrepublican.com Illinois' Rep. Bobby Rush (D) was removed from the House floor Wednesday morning after donning the hood of his sweater — an...

 

The 'rules' about clothing, place and social context are culturally and politically institutionalized. Where can you wear what clothes, and when does that change? Should it change? The clothes literally made this particular speech, since it was about the criminalization of cultural clothing norms within racial and economic groups. Should he have been thrown off the floor? What would you have done?

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:46 PM

“Life is more than a piece of clothing” Bubby Rush.

 

I do understand why congressman did what he did, but I don’t agree with him because he as a congressman, need to set an example to our youth. The house as other institution have rules that should be respect it, there are different way for you to protest if you don’t agree with certain issue. Imagine if show up to my job naked, I would be fired right way. Like my mother has always say “there is a place and time”

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Redlining in 1936 Philadelphia

Redlining in 1936 Philadelphia | Geography Education | Scoop.it

 These are great images that shows the can build historical and geographical empathy for those that were discriminated against during the era of redlining.  These maps from the Home Owners' Loan Corporation mapped and shaped regions of urban disinvestment (but the maps were NOT widely circulated).  This example of redlining in 1936 Philadelphia, links you to primary source documents if you click on the map.  The documents are reports on the property values, resident demographics and descriptions of the residential zones.  For more on the Philadelphia redlining research project, visit: http://cml.upenn.edu/redlining/intro.html

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Using Music to teach about Rwanda

Using Music to teach about Rwanda | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When teaching about ethnic conflicts, especially the Rwandan Genocide, it easy to overlook the influence of music and it’s role in the genocide. The following website discusses the involvement of Simon Bikindi, and Bikindi’s music which was broadcasted on the anti-Tutsi/pro-genocide radio station “RTLM.” These Bikindi songs (along with his biography) can be compelling hook to serve as an introduction to ethnic conflicts.
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