Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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PBS Food: Potatoes

PBS Food: Potatoes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Follow America's favorite vegetable from field to factory — to see how potatoes grow and how they're turned into chips."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: foodeconomic, food production, agribusinessindustry, video, agriculture.

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Ari Galant's curator insight, August 25, 2016 9:53 PM
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Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2016 2:56 PM
papa.
Sophie Wilson's curator insight, August 31, 2016 10:33 AM
This video shows the process of potatoes moving from farm to factory in America and how they are turned into chips. It shows how the potatoes are planted, grown and turned into chips. 
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26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places

26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From cheddar cheese to the tuxedo.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

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Emma Boyle's curator insight, March 2, 2016 12:31 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

MSTA's curator insight, March 3, 2016 3:35 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 4, 2016 3:34 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

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Americans Try Norwegian Christmas Food

See staff at the U.S. Embassy in Oslo try traditional Norwegian Christmas dishes. Se ansatte på den amerikanske ambassaden i Oslo smake på norsk julemat.

 

Tags: Norway, food, culture, seasonal, perspective.

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Thanksgiving Recipes Across the United States

Thanksgiving Recipes Across the United States | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"We’ve scoured the nation for recipes that evoke each of the 50 states (and D.C. and Puerto Rico). These are our picks for the feast. Dig in, then tell us yours." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR 

Seth Dixon's insight:

In addition to this list of distinctive Thanksgiving recipes from each state (I'd love to try so many on this list), the NY Times has also produced this list of the most 'Googled' Thanksgiving recipes in each state.  These are very late additions to my favorite Thanksgiving day resources. Happy Thanksgiving everyone, and may yours reflect some some regional distinctiveness and cultural context that you appreciate.   


Tags: Thanksgiving, place, food.

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Jana Esposito's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:42 PM

Deep fried turkey is a family tradition! Pumpkin pie and garlic mashed potato's are a must every year. Let's eat!

JebaQpt's comment, November 26, 2015 12:18 AM
Thanksgiving, after all, is a word of action. Thanksgiving day quotes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPSml4nQ7rA&list=PLK2ccNIJVPpB3TOPAzbivJTp1L8wSrKLH
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Thanksgiving Maps, Posters and Geospatial Data

Thanksgiving Maps, Posters and Geospatial Data | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving resources for geography educators." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR

Seth Dixon's insight:

This great poster (hi-res) with the accompanying data (available in ArcGIS online) is a great addition to my list of favorite Thanksgiving resources for geography teachers. 


Tags: Thanksgiving, food.

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NESTVAL 2015: The Geography of Food

"My 2015 NESTVAL presentation in an APHG session on the geography of food."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this presentation (PPTx file here), I share some of my favorite resources for teaching the content as well as some pedagogical tips.  Some of these resources are found in an article I wrote for National Geographic or have been shared on this site earlier.  Here are some pedagogical tips to APHG students about food systems:  

  • Tip#1: Don’t demonize agribusiness or romanticize the family farm. 
  • Tip #2: Use data and maps.  Here is a map in ArcGIS online on rural land use activities with a handy dandy instruction guide, ready to go (many more APHG GeoInquiries from ESRI set to be released soon). 
  • Tip #3: Connect them personally into the web of food systems and show how it impacts them. 
  • Tip #4: Let this be one of those units that connects to all the themes of the course, especially population, culture, political, and the environment.  


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:09 PM

Things to consider when teaching about food production from a geographical perspective - remember to link to Biomes.

asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:40 AM

#Food is #geographical and #mobile...

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 26, 1:36 PM
unit 5
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Food Processing

"Trying to break a whole lamb into steaks and roasts in just a little over three minutes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Where does our food come from?  As the global population becomes more urban, the percentage of our population that is more disconnected from their food sources grows.  Additionally, our economic system works to actively separate consumers from the unseemly parts of the commodity chains, in hopes that our propensity to spend money on more goods won't decline.  All animals killed for human consumption go through some sort of butchering process before they become a meat product that we might recognize in the grocery store. 


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness.

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Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 


This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    


Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalizationfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

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BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:24 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 

 

This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    

 

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalization, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

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Living in the Shadow of Industrial Farming

"The world eats cheap bacon at the expense of North Carolina's rural poor." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

In a recent article by QZ (the video above comes from the same investigation), they explore the negative impacts of the pork industry.  People love their bacon memes, but forget about social and environmental impacts of an increased global trend towards higher pork consumption


Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture, agricultural environment, environment, environment modify, pollution. 

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 17, 2015 1:50 PM

Industrial farming, manure lagoons... do you know this type of farming?

Lilydale High School's curator insight, August 17, 2015 7:33 PM

Consequences of living near industrial sites - even if it is farming.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:23 PM

This is pretty insane. I've seen other video's where it is a similar situation around chicken farms in the U.S. The people can't even go outside most of the time due to the smell, and it makes me wonder how much of the way we eat is truly devastating the planet. Beyond the smell, I can't help wonder what these types of farms would do the ground water beneath.

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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 2015 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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The Drying of Lake Urmia

The Drying of Lake Urmia | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Lake Urmia in northwestern Iran was once one of the largest saltwater lakes in the Middle East, but it has diminished dramatically. Diversion of water from local rivers for agricultural use is one likely cause. Since 1996, drought has further contributed to the decline. The lake now covers about 10 percent of the area it covered in the 1970s. In the 2014 image, the entire southern portion of the salty lakebed is exposed. Also see this set of images."


Tags: Iran, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciplesland use, foodfood production, environment.

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Scientists find evidence of wheat in UK 8,000 years ago

Scientists find evidence of wheat in UK 8,000 years ago | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Fragments of wheat DNA suggest wheat was present in Britain 8,000 years ago, long before it was grown by British farmers.
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finkxenon's comment, June 6, 2015 3:09 AM

Fantastic
ANTINO's comment, July 9, 2015 6:45 AM
Thanks
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Urban Farmers Say It's Time They Got Their Own Research Farms

Urban Farmers Say It's Time They Got Their Own Research Farms | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The University of the District of Columbia is the one land-grant university in the U.S. with an urban focus. It's leading research on growing food in raised beds, hoop houses and shipping containers.


Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture

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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:28 PM

Almost 80 percent of Americans live in urban areas and that means many people are wanting to grow their own food in the busy city life. To learn how to properly do this, these people turn to land-grant colleges and universities to give then helpful advice. Many colleges do help with urban and rural ares, but there is only one one in the entire country that is devoted singularly to urban farming; The University of the District of Columbia.

This is a great example of the distribution of agricultural and a great way to educate people on the proper way to cultivate and harvest your own food in small, limited spaces. It also proves that we really can prosper everywhere with the right tools and knowledge about urban farming.

Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:30 PM

Summary: This article goes into extensive detail about urban agriculture and new technologies and techniques that must be brought to urban agriculture.

 

Insight: This article relates to unit 5 because it talks about a new and modern form of agriculture that could become very important when considering the portion of the population living in urban and suburban areas. 

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:20 PM

This could help develop sustainable communities and promote organic growth throughout the country. Which could potentially improve the standard of living

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How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | Geography Education | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.
Seth Dixon's insight:

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

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Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 2016 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 2016 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 2016 9:29 PM
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The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind?

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Genetically modified foods are often regarded as "unnatural" and approached with distrust. Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers the psychology behind these reactions.

 

Why do so many people oppose genetically modified organisms, or GMOs? According to a new paper forthcoming in the journal Trends in Plant Science, it's because opposition to GMOs taps into deep cognitive biases. These biases conspire to make arguments against GMOs intuitive and compelling, whether or not they're backed by strong evidence.

The authors of the paper — a mix of philosophers and biologists — turn to research in the cognitive sciences to shed light on the mismatch between the public's perception of GMOs (which is fairly negative, especially in Europe) and the state of the evidence about their safety (which is fairly positive).

 

Tags: GMOstechnology, agriculture.

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Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off

Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The BBC's Celia Hatton finds out why one restaurant in Shanghai is serving up American-style Chinese food
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article covers the same topic as this NPR podcast, the success of an American-style Chinese restaurant in China.  Some joked that it was akin to selling snow to Eskimos, but there is a local appetite among the youth that want to experiment with the 'foreign,' but also with American ex-pats that crave a taste of home. This is just one more delicious example of how globalization impacts cultural products and how globalization flows in many unexpected directions.  For more, see this TED talk on the search for the origins of General Tso's chicken, and this podcast of the historical geographies of the fortune cookie.    

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, China, East Asia, podcast.

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A Few Things You (Probably) Don’t Know About Thanksgiving

A Few Things You (Probably) Don’t Know About Thanksgiving | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"President Abraham Lincoln established Thanksgiving as a national holiday during the Civil War, and the feast has since become an American tradition. Yet the story of the Wampanoag and the pilgrims who first broke bread is not commonly known." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good source of information that runs counter the mythologized Thanksgiving story that is seen by so many as central to our heritage and national narrative.  Personally, a nice slice of turkey with cranberry sauce is not ruined by knowing that there is more than one perspective to the story. 


Tags: Thanksgiving, food,perspective, historical.

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Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer.

Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer. I really wish you would have done so before your big announcement saying you would, as of 2016, be sourcing all of your turkey and chicken as being raised without antibiotics."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is not a typical source, but it captures an important perspective on our food production systems.  Some policies (like this one from Subway) are designed to increase customer confidence in the quality of the product, but they don't reflect some of the practical issues that farmers have to face on the farm.  


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness.

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Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, November 9, 2015 10:45 AM

I understand the concern over eating meat that has residual antibiotics, but I also understand that disease in animals is as cruel as in humans.  Do we let the animals die from a treatable disease?  Think of the chicken farmers in Iowa who had to destroy their entire flock because of bird flu. What if an antibiotic would have kept the birds healthy?  There is a waiting period after treating an animal before it is safe to harvest for meat, responsible producers know this and abide by best practices.  It is frustrating when a group criticized producers for not caring for their livestock and in the next breath complain about the drugs used to treat them.  

Meat does not come from a machine. There a hundreds of variables that go into producing the safest most reliable food supply on the planet. Three words for those who are still in doubt: Grow Your Own. 

Vicki Bedingfield's curator insight, November 15, 2015 4:58 PM

Food production

Cade Johns's curator insight, January 7, 2016 6:47 PM

Why are they not using antibiotics?Is it to be healthier or for flavor.Either one should attract different crowds.The healthier alternative brings healthier people in there.C.J.

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The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie

The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What we call Chinese food (including the fortune-filled cookies) has become an integral part of the American culture and cuisine, with a complex history that dates back to the 19th Century."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This  99 Percent Invisible podcast explores the fascinating story of the Americanization of Chinese food, and the icon of Chinese food in the States, the  fortune cookie (no, that is decidedly NOT from China).  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content. 

 

That first podcast is reminiscent of a second podcast from  NPR about an American-style Chinese restaurant that opened in Shanghai to cater to Americans living in China who miss 'Chinese food' as it's made back home.  What's the name of the restaurant?  Fortune Cookie, of course. 

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, California, podcast, historical.

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John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 10:44 AM

As with some other cultures, the Chinese food we eat is different from it original homeland (Mexican food is another example). Many thing the fortune cookie if from China, but it is an American idea. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:58 AM

unit 3

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Overpackaged Foods

Tagsfoodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture,


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The Food Capitals of Instagram

The Food Capitals of Instagram | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the popularity of some of the world’s favourite foods on Instagram. Discover Instagram’s capital of curry, which cities are big on burgers, and where pulled pork is most prolific.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I was talking to a good friend about the geographic distribution of poutine after watching the silliest YouTube video. (Montreal is famous for it's poutine, but is in equally widespread throughout Quebec?  Canada?  Is there a core/domain/sphere areas to be mapped? These are the questions that plague geographers.).  True, this map has it's limitations; Instagram hashtag data isn't normalized so the biggest cities tend to pop out more easily, access/use of Instagram isn't uniform, etc.  Still, what a great map to show some geographic applications of social media data.  This sort of map also nicely shows the spatial concepts of region, diffusion, concentration and distribution.  


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturediffusion, popular culture, regions, food.

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Peru's Pitmasters Bury Their Meat In The Earth, Inca-Style

Peru's Pitmasters Bury Their Meat In The Earth, Inca-Style | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What's the epitome of summer for a lot of Americans? It's communing around a grill, with friends and family, waiting for a slab of meat to cook to juicy perfection.

In Peru, people like to gather around heat and meat, too. Except the heat — and the meat — are buried in the ground. It's called pachamanca, a traditional way of cooking that dates back to the Inca Empire. The pit cooking technique has evolved over time but remains an important part of the Peruvian cuisine and culture, especially in the central Peruvian Andes all year-round for family get-togethers and celebrations.


Tags: food, folk culture, culture, indigenous, South AmericaPeru.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:05 PM

this method of cooking is a fantastic way to make food if you don't have a fire or other source of heat. that old joke about the side walk being hot enough to cook bacon on is based in fact.

Colleen Geiger's curator insight, March 10, 2016 9:58 AM
This article is probably my favorite one that I have read on this site. Its's interesting to see the different cultures and their traditions like this one for example. They have a big Sunday meal that they cooked underground using heated lava rocks to cook the variety of vegetables and meat. 
Peyton Conner's curator insight, March 10, 2016 10:17 AM
Pop culture is taking over the whole world and few folk traditions are still around today. I believe this article shows a great example of how societies are still honoring their heritage and ways of life. Even something as simple as a way of cooking preserves cultures that are being lost. PC
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40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs

40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It’s not just a sausage in a bun; it’s a beautiful blank canvas. It’s a hot dog, which is a foodstuff eaten worldwide. Here are 40 distinctive varieties from around the globe — from iconic NYC 'dirty water dogs' to fully loaded South American street-cart dogs to Japanese octo-dogs. There is a tubesteak out there for every craving that ever was."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tagsfoodculturediffusion, globalization, consumption.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:50 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 

 

Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 2016 8:10 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 14, 2016 11:05 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

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Why eating insects makes sense

The world's population is projected to reach 11 billion by the end of the century. Feeding that many people will be a challenge, and it is further complicated by the impact of climate change on agriculture. That is why some people advocate an unusual way to boost the food supply and feed people sustainably: by eating less meat, and more insects.

http://econ.st/1sDYlfM

Seth Dixon's insight:

While it might make economic, nutritional, and environmental sense, I'm sure that many are squeamish at the idea of insects primarily because in violates many deeply engrained cultural taboos.  The main reasons listed in the video for promoting the production and consumption of more insects:

  1. Insects are healthier than meat.
  2. It is cheap (or free) to raise insects.
  3. Raising insects is more sustainable than livestock.


Questions to Ponder: Would you be willing to try eating insects?  How do you think this idea would go over with your family and friends?  What cultural barriers might slow the diffusion of this practice?    


Tagsfoodculturediffusioncultural norms, economicfood production, agriculture.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, June 8, 2015 9:33 AM

When speaking of sustainability, many seek new options, new and more efficient—productively speaking—ways of exploiting resources, different types of energies to make up for the missing future expected quota. However, at not point do they seem to ask themselves what makes inefficiency be the norm, and scarcity the automatic reason to why we need more. The solution is right there, in front of our eyes, and not necessarily in the form of insects., though under the current monetary and economic paradigm, that may seem like a good option.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 2015 10:18 AM

Agriculture, Food security, sustainability, Culture - Yuck factor!

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:31 PM

While it might make economic, nutritional, and environmental sense, I'm sure that many are squeamish at the idea of insects primarily because in violates many deeply engrained cultural taboos.  The main reasons listed in the video for promoting the production and consumption of more insects:

  1. Insects are healthier than meat.
  2. It is cheap (or free) to raise insects.
  3. Raising insects is more sustainable than livestock.

 

Questions to Ponder: Would you be willing to try eating insects?  How do you think this idea would go over with your family and friends?  What cultural barriers might slow the diffusion of this practice?    

 

Tagsfoodculturediffusioncultural norms, economic, food production, agriculture.

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With Booze and Tobacco Taboo, Utah Leads Nation in Candy Eating

With Booze and Tobacco Taboo, Utah Leads Nation in Candy Eating | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"More than 60 percent of Utah’s residents are Mormons, who typically abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco. With those vices frowned upon, candy is an acceptable treat.  Hispanics like Hershey’s Cookies ’n Creme bars in disproportionate numbers, and Minnesotan buy six-packs of Hershey bars at higher rates than any other Americans, particularly in the summer (think s’mores)."


Tags: food distribution, place, food, religion, ethnicity.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This report brings up three interesting tidbits about candy consumption in the United States, but this is also a good article to discuss how businesses should take geography and demographic statistics seriously when crafting their marketing strategies.  

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Ethan Bernick's curator insight, May 26, 2015 8:29 PM

Each region of the USA varies at different degrees. The distribution of Mormons in Utah greatly increases the amount of candy consumed in the area. This could be a perceived region.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:15 PM

Me as a mormon completely understand the desire of candy. Yes alcohol, drugs, tobacco, ect is frowned upon but what intrigues me the most is how candy is so dominant in that region.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:08 PM

More than 60 percent of Utah’s residents are Mormons, who typically abstain from alcohol, caffeine and tobacco. With those vices frowned upon, candy is an acceptable treat.  Hispanics like Hershey’s Cookies ’n Creme bars in disproportionate numbers, and Minnesotan buy six-packs of Hershey bars at higher rates than any other Americans, particularly in the summer (think s’mores).