Geography Education
1.4M views | +535 today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Galapagos Islands and Biodiversity

Galapagos Islands and Biodiversity | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Radiolab wraps 2015 with a series of special episodes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Galapagos Islands (as are most islands) filled with remarkably distinct species from the mainland--one of the key reasons that the island were so instrumental in shaping Charles Darwin's thinking about evolution.  This environmental Radiolab podcast is mainly about the Galapagos wildlife and it's conservation and covers many important biogeographic concepts (with time in the episode): 

  • Traveling to the Galapagos (5:25)
  • Who will fight to protect the environment? (10:00)
  • Tortoises and their role in habitats (13:30)
  • Invasive Species and goats (16:30)
  • Removal of Invasive species (19:00)
  • The return of the original habitat (25:40)
  • Local anger against conservation (26:30)
  • 'Restoring' extinct tortoise species (30:00)
  • How do we best protect nature? (37:00)
  • Genetically engineering extinct species (41:00)
  • Tourism and ecological change (46:45)
  • Darwin and finches (50:00)
  • Endangered finches and flies (55:00)
  • Hybrid species (1:02:00)

 

Tags: Ecuador, biogeography, environmentecology, historical.

more...
Marianne Naughton's curator insight, January 14, 1:33 PM

Wildlife & Conservation

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Dam Collapse

Dam Collapse | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"On November 5, 2015, two dams collapsed at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil. The dam is owned by Samarco, a joint-venture between the mining companies Vale and BHP Billiton. News outlets estimate that more than 62 million cubic meters of wastewater have been unleashed so far with catastrophic consequences. The immediate release of sludge wiped out numerous villages including Bento Rodrigues (shown in greater detail above), causing the death of twelve people. Eleven others are still missing. Because of this pollution, more than half a million people do not have access to clean water for drinking or irrigating their crops. By November 23, the contaminated waters covered a 400 mile stretch of the Rio Doce River and entered into the sea, killing significant amounts of planet and animal life along the way. Officials are concerned that the toxins will threaten the Comboios Nature Reserve, a protected area for the endangered leatherback turtle."

 

Tags: dam, environment, land use, sustainability, landscape, images, environment modify, pollution.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The field guide, rebooted

The field guide, rebooted | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Map of Life joins a small but growing number of mobile applications seeking to reimagine the field guide by combining big data and mobile technology. Following in the footsteps of iNaturalist, a standard-bearer for natural history mobile applications, it allows users to instantly contribute their own geolocated, time-stamped species observations." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

The network of geographic alliances will be working on a BioBlitz national initiative in 2016. This article highlights two mobile apps that will enable users to use their smartphones to explore and archive the natural world around them and run an awesome BioBlitz. 

 

Tags: National Geographicphysical, biogeography, environment, edtech.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.


Tags: religionSouth Asia, culture, Hinduism, pollution, industry, economicenvironment, environment modify, unit 3 culture.

more...
Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:52 PM

The way the people of India see this river as a gift from the god is truly magnificent. The fact that they use this river for all source of things from cleaning themselves up to washing clothes and drinking from it. One can say that they use as much of the resource as possible but they never care for it in a way. For example excessive use of the river and not cleaning it up, use it for corpse and waste disposal. I wonder how long this can last til the river eventually die.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Periodic Table of Elements Scaled to Show The Elements’ Actual Abundance on Earth

The Periodic Table of Elements Scaled to Show The Elements’ Actual Abundance on Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When you learned about The Periodic Table of Elements in high school, it probably didn’t look like this. Above, we have a different way of visualizing the elements. Created by Professor William F. Sheehan at Santa Clara University in 1970, this chart takes the elements (usually shown like this) and scales them relative to their abundance on the Earth’s surface.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Periodic Table of Elements shows each element as a box, but that doesn’t help us understand which elements are the most scarce and abundant.  The “rare earths” are crucial ingredients in cell phones, laptops and magnets that create clean energy; China controls 95% of the rare earths production and are no longer exporting these materials to other countries (some consider the availability of rare earths a risk to U.S. national security).   This image is not a mathematically accurate representation of the true proportions, but an artist's rendition with the given limitations.  For an article on WHY the image above isn't (and can't be) mathematically accurate, read this article.    

 

Tagspollution, industry, economic, energy, resources, environment, environment modify, sustainability.

more...
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 19, 2015 7:57 AM

elements abundance

16s3d's curator insight, November 23, 2015 7:16 AM

Morphisme du tableau périodique des éléments en fonction de leur abondance

Lilydale High School's curator insight, May 17, 5:57 AM
science!
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"After historic rains, Atacama, Chile is exploding with vibrant wildflowers.  Here's a softer side to the disruptive weather phenomenon known as El Nino: an enormous blanket of colorful flowers has carpeted Chile's Atacama desert, the most arid in the world. The cyclical warming of the central Pacific may be causing droughts and floods in various parts of the world, but in the vast desert of northern Chile it has also caused a vibrant explosion of thousands of species of flowers with an intensity not seen in decades."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The driest place on Earth, the Atacama Desert in South America, has spectacular vistas and biogeography ... especially when it rains.  To read more (and see some stunning images) check out the links from the Washington Post, Yahoo, and the Smithsonian Magazine.   It is amazing that life can flourish in even some of the harshest of physical environments. 


Tags: physicalweather and climate, ChileSouth America, biogeography, environmentecology.

more...
Pierre Ratcliffe's comment, October 31, 2015 2:56 AM
How life forms have been dormant for decades or centuries or more. The DNA of these plants were there ready when conditions were favourable.
Leonardo Wild's curator insight, October 31, 2015 9:44 AM

Amazing Nature!

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 2, 2015 12:32 PM

Wow! This is such an amazing thing to see happened in the driest place on Earth. The disruptive weather phenomenon, El Nino really made this place come to life by bringing rainfall and floods. A spectacular site to see, that in the most harshest physical environment, life can flourished.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Geography of E-Waste

The Geography of E-Waste | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The world is increasingly going hi-tech. Many people in our high consumption society want the latest and the greatest; last year’s much anticipated laptops and cell phones are miles behind the newest models that are coming out. So what happens with the old models? Even thrift stores are politely not accepting them as donations. Even some workable machines that were highly valuable 10 years ago are now functionally trash in our society. We can’t put it to the curb to end up in the landfill because of the lead, mercury, and other hazardous materials that can leak into the environment. This type of trash is what we call e-waste. The geography of e-waste is an ‘out of sight out of mind’ problem that we rarely think about but need to due to the ecological impacts of our collective consumption.


Tags: pollutionsustainability, environment, resources, Ghana, Africa.

more...
www.cheapassignmenthelp.com's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:39 AM

Dear student,
Cheap Assignment Help, an online tutoring company, provides students with a wide range of online assignment help services for students studying in classes K-12, and College or university. The Expert team of professional online assignment help tutors at Cheap Assignment Help .COM provides a wide range of help with assignments through services such as college assignment help, university assignment help, homework assignment help, email assignment help and online assignment help.

Our expert team consists of passionate and professional assignment help tutors, having masters and PhD degrees from the best universities of the world, from different countries like Australia, United Kingdom, United States, Canada, UAE and many more who give the best quality and plagiarism free answers of the assignment help questions submitted by students, on sharp deadline. Cheap Assignment Help .COM tutors are available 24x7 to provide assignment help in diverse fields - Math, Chemistry, Physics, Writing, Thesis, Essay, Accounting, Finance, Data Analysis, Case Studies, Term Papers, and Projects etc.

We also provide assistance to the problems in programming languages such as C/C++, Java, Python, Matlab, .Net, Engineering assignment help and Finance assignment help. The expert team of certified online tutors in diverse fields at Cheap Assignment Help .COM available around the clock (24x7) to provide live help to students with their assignment and questions. We have also excelled in providing E-education with latest web technology. The Students can communicate with our online assignment tutors using voice, video and an interactive white board.

We help students in solving their problems, assignments, tests and in study plans. You will feel like you are learning from a highly skilled online tutor in person just like in classroom teaching. You can see what the tutor is writing, and at the same time you can ask the questions which arise in your mind. You only need a PC with Internet connection or a Laptop with Wi-Fi Internet access. We provide live online tutoring which can be accessed at anytime and anywhere according to student’s convenience. We have tutors in every subject such as Math, Chemistry, Biology, Physics and English whatever be the school level. Our college and university level tutors provide engineering online tutoring in areas such as Computer Science, Electrical and Electronics engineering, Mechanical engineering and Chemical engineering.
Regards
http://www.cheapassignmenthelp.com/
http://www.cheapassignmenthelp.co.uk/
http://btechndassignment.cheapassignmenthelp.co.uk/
Email Us:help@cheapaignmenthelp.com

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:22 PM

Areas of proaction and consumption / glean connections between places

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:56 AM

summer work

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Dropping water levels reveal hidden church

Dropping water levels reveal hidden church | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A 16th century church has emerged from the receding waters of the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. This is the second time water levels have dropped low enough to reveal the church since the reservoir was completed in 1966.


Tags: drought, Mexico, water, environment, religion, culture, Christianity,  colonialism, architecture, landscape.

more...
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:59 AM

water Chiapas

www.cheapassignmenthelp.com's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:39 AM

Dear student,
Cheap Assignment Help, an online tutoring company, provides students with a wide range of online assignment help services for students studying in classes K-12, and College or university. The Expert team of professional online assignment help tutors at Cheap Assignment Help .COM provides a wide range of help with assignments through services such as college assignment help, university assignment help, homework assignment help, email assignment help and online assignment help.

Our expert team consists of passionate and professional assignment help tutors, having masters and PhD degrees from the best universities of the world, from different countries like Australia, United Kingdom, United States, Canada, UAE and many more who give the best quality and plagiarism free answers of the assignment help questions submitted by students, on sharp deadline. Cheap Assignment Help .COM tutors are available 24x7 to provide assignment help in diverse fields - Math, Chemistry, Physics, Writing, Thesis, Essay, Accounting, Finance, Data Analysis, Case Studies, Term Papers, and Projects etc.

We also provide assistance to the problems in programming languages such as C/C++, Java, Python, Matlab, .Net, Engineering assignment help and Finance assignment help. The expert team of certified online tutors in diverse fields at Cheap Assignment Help .COM available around the clock (24x7) to provide live help to students with their assignment and questions. We have also excelled in providing E-education with latest web technology. The Students can communicate with our online assignment tutors using voice, video and an interactive white board.

We help students in solving their problems, assignments, tests and in study plans. You will feel like you are learning from a highly skilled online tutor in person just like in classroom teaching. You can see what the tutor is writing, and at the same time you can ask the questions which arise in your mind. You only need a PC with Internet connection or a Laptop with Wi-Fi Internet access. We provide live online tutoring which can be accessed at anytime and anywhere according to student’s convenience. We have tutors in every subject such as Math, Chemistry, Biology, Physics and English whatever be the school level. Our college and university level tutors provide engineering online tutoring in areas such as Computer Science, Electrical and Electronics engineering, Mechanical engineering and Chemical engineering.
Regards
http://www.cheapassignmenthelp.com/
http://www.cheapassignmenthelp.co.uk/
http://btechndassignment.cheapassignmenthelp.co.uk/
Email Us:help@cheapaignmenthelp.com

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Ogallala Aquifer

The Ogallala Aquifer | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hidden beneath the 245,000 square miles that make up the Great Plains, resides a lake that’s one of our greatest water assets: The Ogallala Aquifer. Haven’t heard of it? Farming the plains would be unprofitable at best without it, as shown by the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. At the time, the aquifer’s existence was known, but the technology to tap into it wasn’t.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Portions of the High Plains Aquifer are rapidly being depleted by farmers who are pumping too much water to irrigate their crops, particularly in the southern half in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.  This podcast explores the environmental and economic impacts of this unsustainable situation.


Tags: wateragriculture, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, podcast.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Human activities are reshaping Earth's surface

Human activities are reshaping Earth's surface | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This ESRI interactive web app uses the "swipe" function to compare 12 places over time.  These locations have experienced significant environmental change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, Aral Sea.

more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:31 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 10:35 AM

Give a great interactive way to see how humans have impacted the earth. 

Sally Egan's curator insight, February 14, 5:45 PM

This is a great interactive showing change in a range of environments from 1990 to current as a result of human activities including agriculture, industry and urban expansion. The slide bar allows you to show differences in the location on a split image.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Lawn Order

Lawn Order | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In communities across America, lawns that are brown or overgrown are considered especially heinous. Elite squads of dedicated individuals have been deputized by their local governments or homeowners’ associations to take action against those whose lawns fail to meet community standards."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that shows not only the environmental aspects of America’s obsession with well-manicured lawns, it also nicely explored the cultural norms that police our behavior to create the stereotypical suburban landscape.  This is my favorite quote from the podcast: “There’s a paradox to the lawn. On the one hand, it is the pedestal on which sits the greatest symbol of the American Dream: the home, which people can ostensibly govern however they wish. And yet—homeowners often have almost no control over how they should maintain their lawn. Grass may be a plant, but a lawn is a designed object.”


Tags: housingneighborhood, cultural norms, consumption, water, environmenturban ecology, culture.


"When the well's dry, we know the worth of water." ~Benjamin Franklin

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Great Barrier Reef

"Australia urged the UN's World Heritage Committee to keep the Great Barrier Reef off the 'in danger' list to protect their tourism industry. But that doesn't mean the ecological treasure is not in danger."


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, Australia, Oceania.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the most beautiful things in the world can be the most susceptible to sweeping environmental transformations.

more...
Danielle Kedward's curator insight, September 12, 2015 7:38 AM
World Heritage for Year 7
Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:29 PM

Great article for the GBR as an ecosystem at risk.

Chris Costa's curator insight, December 1, 2015 4:27 PM

I have enjoyed the emphasis on the human aspect of geography in this course, and how geography impacts us. However, as much as the world influences us, we do have a substantial amount of influence on the composition of the planet, oftentimes for the worse. The Great Barrier Reef is one of the greatest wonders of the world, home to some of the most spectacular sights one can see; as someone who has been scuba diving a handful of times, I can only imagine what it must be like to explore such a world below the surface, seeing all the life that surrounds me. I would love to be able to at some point in my life, but there is a great probability that I might never get the opportunity, as the reef is dying- fast. 50% of the reef has been lost over the past 3 decades, and while Australia has pledged to reserve over a billion dollars to fund conservation efforts, it might be a case of too little, too late. Man-made climate change as a whole is taking a toll on one of nature's greatest treasures, and it might be out of the hands of the Australian damage to reverse the damage that has already been done. I would love to have the opportunity to see this one day, and I hope I get to, but I don't know if I ever will if current rates of reef loss continue. Here's to hoping humanity gets it act together and tries to save the geography we often take for granted; we won't like the ugly landscapes that will follow if we don't.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

40 years of human activities you can see from space

Satellites have been watching us for 40 years. Here's what their images reveal.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is simple entry point into the various applications of remote sensing as well as various human and environmental interactions. This video highlights 5 examples: 

1. Deforestation (Brazil)

2. Water Use (Aral Sea)

3. Urban Sprawl (Las Vegas)

4. Energy (Coal in Wyoming)

5. Climate Change (Ice Shelf in Antarctica)


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples, K12, land use, environment.

more...
Fe'iloakitau Kaho Tevi's curator insight, June 18, 2015 5:57 PM

Amazing to see  progress and its consequences on earth...our resources and the insatiable hunger for natural resources.....when is enough, enough?

Ambre Cooper's curator insight, June 25, 2015 4:04 PM

This is a cool little video. It even shows the level of Aral Sea we read about.

Hamdou Wane's curator insight, June 29, 2015 7:55 AM

Satellites have been watching us for 40 years. Here's what their images reveal

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Indonesia on Fire

"In Indonesia’s Central Kalimantan province, the peat areas are burning and emitting a toxic smoke causing untold damage to the environment, wildlife and human health. Most of the fires in Central Kalimantan are blazing in former peatland forests, which have been drained, cleared and burned for oil palm and agriculture, large and small. The dried-out peat ignites easily, burns underground and creeps under the surface. Experts from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) travel to the heart of the fires to see the situation with their own eyes and measure the extent of the impact."
More information please visit: http://blog.cifor.org/fire

Seth Dixon's insight:
Extreme forest and peat burning in Indonesia has released over three times the annual fossil fuel emissions of the United Kingdom.
 
 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

What are Lavakas?

What are Lavakas? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The word lavaka means 'hole' or 'gully' in Malagasy, and it has become the accepted international term for the spectacular erosional features that characterize the highlands of Madagscar. Lavakas are gullies formed by groundwater flow, with steep or vertical sides and flat floors."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Lavakas are often seen as an ecological catastrophe since rapid deforestion leads to young, active lavakas that can silt up rice fields.  While obviously not desirable, these scars on a deforested landscape do offer a glimmer of hope as well. Some National Geographic explorers are finding that older, stabilized lavakas can become great agricultural pockets for rebuilding in these denuded communities.

 

Tags: Madagascar, erosion, environment adapt,  environmentecology, political ecology, Africa, National Geographic.

more...
Patty B's curator insight, February 11, 4:09 PM

This article from williams.edu, titled What are Lavaka’s, focuses on just that. It describes that a lakava, meaning “hole or “gully” in Malagasy, are gullies found in Madagascar that are caused by erosion. They are found on slopes and generally at an altitude of roughly 1,000 feet. Lakavas form where there is a concentration of softer material that is susceptible to erosion and frequent earthquake activity. For communities near lakavas there can be severe consequences to be alongside these geographic features. The article explains that lakava erosion can “damage infrastructure, remove hillslope pasturage, and causes debris flows that devastates agricultural land in the valleys.” Lakavas and the destruction they can potentially cause reveal an important fact of class distinction: the rich get the good land and the poor get the infertile, uninhabitable, dangerous territories. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Marshall Islands Are Disappearing

The Marshall Islands Are Disappearing | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Most of the 1,000 or so Marshall Islands, spread out over 29 narrow coral atolls in the South Pacific, are less than six feet above sea level — and few are more than a mile wide. For the Marshallese, the destructive power of the rising seas is already an inescapable part of daily life. Changing global trade winds have raised sea levels in the South Pacific about a foot over the past 30 years, faster than elsewhere. Scientists are studying whether those changing trade winds have anything to do with climate change.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The impacts of climate change might feel far off or something that will affect other places...not so for those in the Marshall Islands. 


Tags: Oceania, environment, resources, watercoastal, environment depend, climate change, political ecology.

more...
John Puchein's curator insight, December 4, 2015 6:47 AM

Although there is controversy with climate change, many are feeling the affects. From the Marshall Islands, to Venice, Italy, to as close as Miami, many places are feeling the impact of rising seas.  

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:17 PM

The impacts of climate change might feel far off or something that will affect other places...not so for those in the Marshall Islands. 


Tags: Oceania, environment, resources, water, coastal, environment depend, climate change, political ecology.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, December 12, 2015 6:21 AM

Climate change is a controversial issue in the United States. The debate over climate change in our current political environment is stuck in a denial or belief stage.  It is foolish to deny that our climate is changing. The overwhelming majority of scientists have provided the world with data, that proves that man is altering the climate. Those who deny climate change, probably do not really believe that it is not occurring.  They are denying climate change, because they do not favor altering our economic system in an attempt to stop the phenomenon. To really effect climate change, major changes are going to have to be made in the way we consume our energy. Our current political environment cannot and will not implement these changes. As with most problems, nothing will be accomplished until a large swath of Florida is underwater.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Living Bridges

"In Northeast India just north of Bangladesh is the province of Meghalaya."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The living bridges of Meghalaya are truly sights to behold; these astonishing bridges are a natural way that local people have adapted to an incredibly flood-prone environment.  The organic building materials prevent erosion and keep people in contact during times of flood.  Here is another video and articles (BBC, Atlas Obscura, Inhabitat, and MNN) with more ecological and cultural context on these living bridges. 


Tags: environment, environment adapt, SouthAsia, water, weather climate, indigenousbiogeography.

more...
Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:16 PM

I think these bridges are of great value to the world... Nature provides us with such amazing natural resources. There is really no need to do half the damage we do to it. what a beautiful way to keep the environment's natural beauty intacted

 

Kimmy Jay's curator insight, November 20, 2015 6:28 PM

H/E Interaction 

 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Electronic Afterlife

"E-Waste is a growing problem in our consumer-based society. The geography of e-waste is an ‘out of sight out of mind’ problem that we rarely think about but need to due to the ecological impacts of our collective consumption." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1LT


Tags: pollutionsustainability, environment, resources, Ghana, Africa.

more...
Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, November 10, 2015 11:37 AM

Maybe getting that new iPhone isn't such a good idea, eh?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Is Here

Climate Change Is Here | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Record heat, fading ice, and rising seas show how climate change is affecting us. But there’s new hope we can cool the planet. Here’s how.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The National Geographic Magazine has recently created this interactive to accompany the magazine article on climate change (for those worried that the editorial direction would not be as environmentally focused because of the recent changes for the National Geographic Society, I think this is a resounding way for them to emphatically declare that they are committed as ever to their core values and mission).  This interactive is richly-laden with videos, images and case-studies, showing the tangible impacts of climate change and lays out what the future implications of these changes.  The interactive is organized to answer these main questions:

  • How do we know it’s happening?
  • How do we fix it?
  • How do we live with it


Tags: physical, weather and climateenvironment, National Geographic, climate change, water.

more...
Tony Hall's curator insight, October 30, 2015 2:21 AM

This is a very good resource on climate change. Well worth having a look:)

John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:30 AM

This site is great to show evidence of climate change. It has various sites with videos and articles.  The interactive is organized to answer these main questions:

How do we know it’s happening?How do we fix it?How do we live with it?
Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 10:15 AM

There is too much talk about helping the climate and environment. All politicians do is talk about cleaning the environment and having less pollution. Even Al Gore is big talk. I've only heard of little change. I want to see a difference. I want to see people actually doing things to help the environment. Enough talk. What should happen is a world wide clean up. Jobs should be created where people should clean in their own community. Its a simple job. Get a trash bag, get off your lazy butts, get out of the house, get a group together (who would be paid by the state) to pick trash up off the streets, beaches, trails in the woods, baseball fields, parks. This isn't hard to do. Not just one person, but if a group of people can come together and be employed by their state to clean their community, at least four days a week. There should also be a group of people, even fisherman to clean the ocean, go out and get what ever trash you can find. Using nets, and if fish are caught, throw them back in the ocean. Also, Trash Island has to be eliminated. It boggles my mind that who ever passed the law on trash being dumped into the ocean an Okay to do. Are you kidding me?? What is wrong with you? Our Earth is dying because of humanity. Also the oil spill that happened in 2012, I believe, I saw a man on the news that created a way to capture the oil floating on the surface of the ocean with a blanket like material, sure it would take a lot of those "blankets" but at least it would be helping to rid the ocean from oil. What are people thinking?? that the oil will just disappear?? Are you serious? So many people really have to open their minds. Look at what's happening you ignorant selfish fools. I will finish my rant right here.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Changes in Three Gorges Dam

NASA's animation of China's Three Gorges Dam construction over the years.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world’s largest dam was created to generate more energy for China’s ever-expanding economy and to increase the interior economic development by increasing the navigability of the river.  The dam also can control downstream flooding and protect important industrial centers such as Shanghai.  This ambitious hydroelectric dam produces the same amount of energy as 18 nuclear power plants.  This dam also displaced over 1 million people as the reservoir flooded properties upstream.  The Three Gorges Dam prevents the nutrient-rich sediments from being deposited downstream; this heightens Chinese farmers’ need for fertilizers, this has led to drought downstream and limits residents’ water access. The dam also disrupted the local ecology (part of the reason the Yangtze River Dolphin went extinct), preventing fish to migrate to upstream breeding grounds. 

For good and ill, the dam has profoundly modified the environment and this video animation from NASA is a powerful demonstration of the changes.       


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, video, land use, environment, environment modify, water, economic, development, China, East Asia, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2015 6:32 PM

Inland water - environmental change 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 5:40 PM

The impact of the Three Gorges Dam on the residents upstream is amazing. I cannot imagine anything like this happening in the US, mostly because of the impact on the people both upstream and downstream. Ecological damage from this dam may not phase the Chinese government, but I think any North American or European government would shudder at the thought of the backlash among their citizens this would create.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:27 PM

Three Gorges damn in China is the largest dam ever constructed. This was created to save on power by creating hydroelectric power for the people of the land. One of the issues with this was the the flooding of the land up streams displacing millions of people. It created a larger up stream area and very small down stream. A lot of the people that lived up stream had to be relocated further inland and faced changing climatif weather. The banks of the river are carved out between what seems like mountainous regions so as you move more uphill the weather and temperature will be a whole new category of life (Depending on how far you relocated).

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different

How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different | Geography Education | Scoop.it
While researching a book on ‘Why the Dutch are Different’, Ben Coates realised that an amazingly large number of the things which an outsider might think of as ‘typically Dutch’ could be explained at least in part by a single factor: water.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Cultural, political and economic patterns of a region are heavily influenced by the environmental settings.  Occasionally though, geographers can get overly-cautious when discussing how the environment can shape culture, worried about straying into realm of environmental determinism.  However, environmental factors can profoundly influence cultural attributes.  This article shows how Dutch cultural attributes such as diet, history, politics and landscape are influenced by their maritime physical setting. 

 

TagsNetherlands, culture, place, water, environment.

more...
asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:37 AM

What is "typically" #Dutch? #sea #saltwater #sailing #trade #ancient #heritage

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:50 AM

unit 3

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:55 AM

Environmental Determinalism....Unit 3

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How El niño affects commodity prices

"Cocoa, coffee and minerals are especially vulnerable to the weather pattern first named by Peruvian fishermen."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Geography is all about the finding the connections between seemingly unrelated issues. The geography of coffee is connected to weather, cultural, economic and many other geographies.  


Tags: environment, resources, economic, weather and climate, agriculture.

more...
PSC AS Geography's curator insight, September 21, 2015 8:24 AM

Linking of El Nino weather patterns to commodities of food and metals.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Earth is Home to 3.02 Trillion Trees

Earth is Home to 3.02 Trillion Trees | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A new census that shows that Earth is host to a staggering 3.02 trillion trees — more than scientists expected.The most recent estimate only counted 400 billion trees, reports Rachel Ehrenberg. Because prior studies used satellite technology alone instead of including data from on-the-ground tree density studies, writes Ehrenberg, they missed the mark. They also estimate that since human civilization began, 45.8 percent of all trees been lost."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love satellite data, but ground-truthing is critical to so many research projects. 


Tagsremote sensing, conservation, physical, biogeography, environment, resources.

more...
Felipe Rengifo's curator insight, September 16, 2015 10:49 AM

Censo de árboles está en 3.02 trillones de arboles 

 

Suena como mucho, pero con en realidad son pocos para tanta gente. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Living in the Shadow of Industrial Farming

"The world eats cheap bacon at the expense of North Carolina's rural poor." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

In a recent article by QZ (the video above comes from the same investigation), they explore the negative impacts of the pork industry.  People love their bacon memes, but forget about social and environmental impacts of an increased global trend towards higher pork consumption


Tags: food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture, agricultural environment, environment, environment modify, pollution. 

more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 17, 2015 1:50 PM

Industrial farming, manure lagoons... do you know this type of farming?

Lilydale High School's curator insight, August 17, 2015 7:33 PM

Consequences of living near industrial sites - even if it is farming.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:23 PM

This is pretty insane. I've seen other video's where it is a similar situation around chicken farms in the U.S. The people can't even go outside most of the time due to the smell, and it makes me wonder how much of the way we eat is truly devastating the planet. Beyond the smell, I can't help wonder what these types of farms would do the ground water beneath.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design)

Why are we so reliant on air conditioning? (It's not just climate change, it's bad design) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Air conditioners have made architects lazy, and we've forgotten how to design houses that might work without it.


A hundred years ago, a house in Florida looked different than a house in New England. The northern house might be boxy, have relatively small windows, almost always two stories with low ceilings, and a big fireplace in the middle. 

In Florida, the house might have high ceilings, tall double-hung windows, and deep porches. Trees would be planted around the house to block the sun. 

Today, houses pretty much look the same wherever you go in North America, and one thing made this possible: central air conditioning. Now, the United States uses more energy for air conditioning than 1 billion people in Africa use for everything.


Tags: planning, architecture, housingurban, place, environment adaptenergyconsumption.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.

more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 23, 2015 1:12 PM

A GOOD STORY ABOUT AIR CONDITIONING

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:18 PM

The recent demographic shift to the "Sun Belt" in the U.S.  coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors).  Our homes are less regionally distinct and in terms of the human/environmental interactions, our answer is greater modifications as opposed to regional adaptations...this article is a call for more architectural improvements instead of more energy consumption to beat the heat.  In Europe however, they see the United States as "over air-conditioned" in the summer.