Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic Fracking | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking', is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside."


Seth Dixon's insight:

This website, Dangers of Fracking, is clearly not produced by the oil industry.  What I enjoy about this resource is that as you scroll down, it adds more context to the environmental issues and geographic factors.  This type of website promotes holistic thinking and an interdisciplinary approach to complex problems.  Why am I leery of the fracking companies and what they say?  This is why


Tagsenergy, resources, environment, environment modify, ecology.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:37 PM

Hydrographic Turing puts people in  safety and health risks. Because the water is contaminated and because of the oil spills, blow outs, and fires. They put chemicals into the ground in order to make cracks in the earth to collect natural oil, but they use people's land in order to collect the oil. People are complaining about these industries because they now have to buy water every month instead of getting it from their sinks or wells. Not to mention some houses have already blew up or caught on favor thanks to hydro fracturing. They need to put a stop to this, at least do it on land that is not being used and far away from people.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:07 PM

The development of gas is important for energy but there are health and safety risks with cracking in neighborhoods. Quality of air and water is important for survival. Nature matters and people matter, they need to find a middle ground. 

Kuzi's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:42 AM

The visual example explained the procses

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In Norway, TV Program on Firewood Elicits Passions

In Norway, TV Program on Firewood Elicits Passions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A TV program about firewood, mostly showing a fireplace in use, has aroused passions in Norway.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In so many countries this would be one of the worst rated TV shows of all time, and yet in Norway, where a rustic, outdoorsman connection to the forest is ingrained in the culture, it's a hit and one that sparks debates and discussion.  Isn't it good, Norwegian Wood?  

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chris tobin's comment, February 28, 2013 1:46 PM
So many cultures depend upon using wood and their connection with nature for every day life
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 1:11 PM

Every country has some form of cultural differentiation between different people. The population of Norway is split in half in regards to whether or not wood should be stacked face up, or face down. Norwegians are obsessed with firewood and fireplaces. Because of the cold climate, almost all Norwegians have at least one fireplace in their house. This interest turned into an eight hour program where people chopped and stacked wood, and then the camera focused on a live fire for hours on end. The people were entranced, and it became an immediate hit. Fire and firewood is very symbolic for Norwegians, and many believe that it not only brings warmth, but community and shared happiness and togetherness. Relationships between harsh environments and modes of survival are often turned into a form of national identity. 

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Energy Conservation

Energy Conservation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Energy conservation starts at home....


This interesting National Geographic article emphasizes how consumption patterns in the home are connected to some of the serious global issues that we currently face.  This article becomes an exploration into how to go about creating a more environmentally sustainable home. 

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Teresa Gallego Navarro's curator insight, December 18, 2012 9:50 PM

The best energy is the one we don´t consumpt!!

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.

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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests

Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new global survey suggests world's the most wasteful countries feel the least guilty—and vice-versa.

 

Our consumption patterns, ecological footprint and lifestyle choices have a significant impact on how we feel about sustainability initiatives and human/environmental interactions.  

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Seth D.'s comment, September 4, 2012 8:27 AM
This article explains about America being the least green in the world when it comes to transportation, etc. Things are being done which can bring a good impact to our environment like cleaner gasoline or cars that are run on electricity like the hybrid cars that you see in the commercials on TV. But, there's also a few other ways to make a good impact on the environment like riding a bicycle to work for take public transportation or walk to places you want to go to. Not only we can get good exercise by walking or riding a bicycle but you can reduce the emmissions in the air form your own car. When it comes to food, Americans can start eating vegetables to make a good impact on the environment.
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Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational

Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The final 32 generators went into operation this week, making it the world's largest hydropower project, pictured, built on the Yangtze River in China."  This photo gallery has a tremendous video at the end that displays vividly the raw power that moves the turbines.  Economically, what are the benefits? Environmentally, what are the costs?    

 


Via John Foden
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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:07 PM

The three gorges dam displays the extraordinary things man can do to manipulate the environment.  This man made dam also shows how much technology influences our geographic space. 

 

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Cambridge Ideas - How Many Lightbulbs?

Cambridge University physicist, David Mackay, in a passionate, personal analysis of the energy crisis in the UK, in which he comes to some surprising conclus...

 

This is a great video to show students the amount of energy they use, both at an individual level and at the national scale (this video is from the U.K.)  To 'flip' this Ted-Ed talk, visit it's homepage at: http://ed.ted.com/on/MVwtmMV5

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Climate Change is Simple

David Roberts is staff writer at Grist.org. In "Climate Change is Simple" he describes the causes and effects of climate change in blunt, plain terms. On Apr...

 

This is video is designed to explain climate change in 15 minutes.  If you would like see the slides presented, you can see them at: http://grist.org/climate-change/climate-change-is-simple-we-do-something-or-were-screwed/

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Most Polluted Cities 2012

Most Polluted Cities 2012 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

What factors lead to high pollution rates in Bakersfield, Los Angeles and Fresno?  How are economic, industrial, political and environmental factors contributing to or mitigating the situation?  

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Eric Séguin's comment, June 1, 2012 7:27 AM
Map serves absolutely nothing. Keep the infographic and be done with: "do you know where Bakersfield, CA is". If you actually had the coverage of these types of pollution then maps would be useful.
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New Evidence Reveals Shell Wildly Underreported Niger Delta Oil Spill

New Evidence Reveals Shell Wildly Underreported Niger Delta Oil Spill | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New data shows Shell dramatically under-estimated the damage of a 2008 spill that devastated the lives of tens of thousands of people in Niger Delta. Shell has yet to compensate victims.

 

The volume of oil spilt at Bodo was more than 60 times the volume Shell has repeatedly claimed leaked.  This is but one example of a international corporation exploiting the natural resources of a developing country.


Via John Peterson
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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 8:12 PM

This article talks about how Shell seems to have underestimated the damage caused by the oil spill in 2008 when tens of thousands of barrels of oil polluted the land and creeks surrounding Bodo. The spill has compromised the access to clean food and water, destroyed livelyhoods and put health at risk. Shell still has not compositated the people of Bodo with the bags of food to replace what was destroyed nor have they cleaned up the spill. These poor people, they have had so much destroyed and need help from shell and they refuse to step up and take responsibility and do what it right. 

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of...

 

This video is a great primer for discussing human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change. 

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50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster

50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster | Geography Education | Scoop.it
50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster: Today marks the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. ...

 

A haunting gallery that displays the effects of environmental and political mismanagement. 

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 3:03 PM

The pictures are breathtaking.  What was once a modern and prosperous area is now completely devestated and basically irreparable for hundreds of years to come.  In some of the pictures it is possible to see the haste and desertion of buildings and rooms which gives a sense of fear and panic that the people experienced.  There is surely still so much that can be explored, but the radiation limits people and the danger of the area is hard for civilians to be within the boundaries of Chernobyl.  Places like this show how drastic the rise and fall of the Soviet Union really was.  Similar to mono-towns in Siberia, these areas were set up for people to flourish and become successful, but as history went on and disasters ensued, the great empire came crashing down.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:51 AM

These photo's are rather gripping.  Many of the images seen here are of objects that have not moved or been touched in 25 years.  The entire population of Pripyat had to pack their bags and leave all in an instant. The chaos that must have ensued after the nuclear meltdown must have been haunting. Pripyat will remain like this for years to come, and one can imagine what it will look like in 25 more years.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:06 PM

this is a haunting reminder that we must always try to prevent the horrifying failures that result from mismanagement. that this was an event that had impacts as far away as France is often forgotten, and the thoughts of what may happen if something larger happens is even more horrifying.

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Teaching Sustainability across Scale and Culture: Biogas in Context

Teaching Sustainability across Scale and Culture: Biogas in Context | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Teaching sustainability invariably involves teaching about energy – its use, its sources, its environmental impacts, and its social implications. This paper explores how one renewable energy alternative – biogas – is adapted and applied across scale and culture."

 

This scholarly article (produced by an outstanding AP Human Geography reader and Penn State Geographer) in the Journal of Sustainability Education has many different  applications: development, renewable energy usage and environmental sustainability.

 

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A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World

A New Way to Illuminate Inequality Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Want to know where the poor live? Look at where the light isn’t.


"Satellite photos of Earth’s artificial lights at night form a luminescent landscape. But researcher Chris Elvidge of NOAA and colleagues from the University of Colorado and the University of Denver realized that they could also illuminate something much darker: the magnitude of human poverty. By comparing the amount of light in a particular area and its known population, they realized that they could infer the percentage of people who are able to afford electricity and the level of government spending on infrastructure development. This allowed them to extrapolate levels of human development—a measure of well-being that includes such factors as income, life expectancy and literacy."

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The Middle East’s Surprising Appetite for Oil

The Middle East’s Surprising Appetite for Oil | Geography Education | Scoop.it
CFR experts examine the science and foreign policy surrounding climate change, energy, and nuclear security.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Most everyone knows about the importance of Middle Eastern oil to the global economy and how that impacts geopolitics.  What isn't well-known is that the Middle East's own demand for oil has been increasing as their wealth and standard of living has been rising.  This chart does not show the amount of oil consumption, but the "energy intensity."  This is the amount of energy (often oil) used to produce a unit of GDP for a country's economy.  


Questions to Ponder: How will this change oil-producing countries economic development in the future?  How does this make us re-assess these economies?  Does this impact how we think about climate change issues?

 

Tags: energy, resources, Middle East, development.

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Seth Dixon's comment, December 12, 2012 3:07 PM
In essence, this is measuring "how many miles per gallon" your economy is getting.
geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:37 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"Most everyone knows about the importance of Middle Eastern oil to the global economy and how that impacts geopolitics.  What isn't well-known is that the Middle East's own demand for oil has been increasing as their wealth and standard of living has been rising.  This chart does not show the amount of oil consumption, but the "energy intensity."  This is the amount of energy (often oil) used to produce a unit of GDP for a country's economy.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How will this change oil-producing countries economic development in the future?  How does this make us re-assess these economies?  Does this impact how we think about climate change issues?"

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:49 PM

Many people are well-aware of the Middle East's important part in the world oil market, but many fail to realize that this region consumes more oil than any other. Government subsidized oil prices combined with a rising economy spurring increased population growth and development makes parts of this region thirsty for petroleum. Cars are becoming more popular and as areas develop, electricity is being produced by the direct burning of fossil fuels. Meanwhile, countries like Saudi Arabia continue producing massive amounts of oil. This natural resource is what is going to shape this region in the upcoming years, providing major economic development that may trickle down to the people. 

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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 12, 2015 4:58 PM

Unnatural landscapes. Amongst all the new technology and graphics, the world still holds phenomena’s that can leave any persons jaw dropped. This article on buzzfeed shows 25 images that can amaze you. In Mt. Roraima, Venezuela there is a slab of land that seems to be suspended in the clouds. The Metro in Stockholm, Sweden resembles a space station in the rocks. The tunnel of love in the Ukraine looks like a path carved out of bush and also a romantic place for a date. The tulip Fields in Lisse, Netherlands looks like a grounded rainbow. Lapland, Finland is home to massive natural snow creatures. The mountains of Zhangye, China resembles the colors and look of Zebra stripe gum. Lake Rebta in Senegal looks like your floating in tomato soup.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 11:43 AM

Physical geography and landforms are something that have amazed people for millennia. The world's tallest mountains, deepest oceans, widest rivers, and largest deserts have, at various times, astounded, baffled, and hindered human beings. Some physical features are helpful to human progress (cities built on hills are more defensible, rivers allow for irrigation for agriculture) and others delay it (mountains are difficult to traverse, oceans are large and treacherous to navigate). And then there are landforms or geographic features that are just downright strange or unusual, like the ones listed in this article. 

 

While looking at pictures of these places or visiting them may be fun, they also provide us with a valuable lesson about nature. Nature is a force to be reckoned with, as it can produce some pretty amazing and unusual things. People sometimes do not stop to think what nature can do and as a result, suffer the consequences (Napoleon, and later Hitler's ill-fated invasions of Russia, for instance). Geography and natural landforms can be invaluable tools in human progress, but it should also be kept in mind that they are part of nature, and that nature is an unpredictable and sometimes violent force. As with anything, then, nature and geography must be respected and feared to avoid making the same mistakes that others have made in the past. 

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 11:34 AM

Another interesting failure of the Soviets during the Cold War. One really begins to question their competence when reading about this, Chernobyl and the Aral Sea. I honestly don't see how anyone would consider lighting a major gas leak on fire would help the situation either. Regardless this site stands as a testament to the influence we have on the geography of area through our reshaping for society. The incident also now helps Turkmenistan economically because it offers tourist attraction revenue. Additionally while the gallery had many fascinating images from around the world this one captivated me due to its historical nature and affect it would have had on the region. Hopefully the site doesn't ever become too dangerous do to the flammable substances because I would imagine that is a possibility (also hopefully there is not too much environmental damage from it either).

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Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay

Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It is increasingly clear that we already live in the era of human-induced climate change, with unprecedented weather and climate extremes.

 

I don't delight in sharing the bad news.  So is this drought just a freak anomaly or a sign of a new normal?

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Seth Dixon's comment, August 13, 2012 2:28 PM
The graphic was not connected to the article. It was linked on a PBS facebook page and I linked the juxtaposition of the graphic and the NY Times article. Here is the FB page: https://www.facebook.com/EarthTheOperatorsManual.Page Personally, an entire century as a baseline of comparison does not feel like cherrypicking data. True the Earth is an incredibly complex system that controlling for all variables is in essence impossible, but denying that the system has changed seems foolish to me. Why has the system changed? I'm okay with that being a reasonable debate worthy of academics.
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Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.

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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

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Blackfriars station, the world's largest solar bridge

Blackfriars station, the world's largest solar bridge | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The new Blackfriars station, which is being built on a bridge spanning the River Thames, is on its way to becoming the world's largest solar bridge after Solarcentury begun the installation of over 4,400 solar photovoltaic panels...

 

"The solar panels will generate an estimated 900,000kWh of electricity every year, providing 50% of the station’s energy and reducing CO2 emissions by an estimated 511 tonnes per year. In addition to solar panels, other energy saving measures at the new station will include rain harvesting systems and sun pipes for natural lighting."

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 6, 2012 8:21 PM
Its definitely a step in the right direction to conserve our natural resources. Our future won't be easy without renewable energy, and all of our natural resources expended.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 9, 2012 6:43 PM
Finding new sources of renewable/sustainable energy would definitely be a lot easier if more countries were willing to work together.
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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | Geography Education | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  

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Landscapes of Oil

Landscapes of Oil | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Socks is a online magazine about Media, Art, Architecture, Cities, Design, Technology.

 

Our society is obviously heavily dependent on oil.  Yet we often don't see the environmental impacts of our collective oil consumption on the landscape because the negative impacts have been spatially separated away from oil consumers.  This is an excellent compilation of photos by Edward Burtynsky that makes the connection between oil consumption and changes to both the physical and cultural landscapes explicit.  For more images by this artist, see: http://www.edwardburtynsky.com/ ;

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The Energy Wars Heat Up - Truthdig

The Energy Wars Heat Up - Truthdig | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Conflict and intrigue over valuable energy supplies have been features of the international landscape for a long time.
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Sustainable Urbanism

"Jaime Lerner reinvented urban space in his native Curitiba, Brazil. Along the way, he changed the way city planners worldwide see what’s possible in the metropolitan landscape.  From building opera houses with wire to mapping the connection between the automobile and your mother-in-law, Jaime Lerner delights in discovering eccentric solutions to vexing urban problems. In the process he has transformed the face of cities worldwide."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Jaime Lerner does not see cities as the problem; he sees urbanism as the solution to many global problems.  This video outlines practical plans to rethink the city to be more sustainable.  Click here to see the trailer for a documentary about the urban changes in Curitiba, Brazil. 

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 2014 11:47 AM

This video is enlightening.  The speaker uses the city as a model for fixing problems in the world.  Instead of seeing the city as an enemy to environmentalism, he purposes changing the cities and reworking old sites like quarries into something that is useable today.  He also advocates the integration of the transportation systems to make commuting more feasible as well as less pollution generating. 

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Greenest states to own an electric car

Greenest states to own an electric car | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The carbon emissions produced by electric cars vary depending on how a given region generates its electricity.

 

If a consumer is trying to assess the environmental impact of their automotive/transportation practices, that answer may vary according to wher they live; the type of driving, the regions energy source and local air quality all need to be factored in.  Geography always matters. 

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The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices

The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rising gas prices make people unhappy, but the pain is felt most acutely in states where it is unlikely to make an electoral difference.

 

There are numerous geographic themes that make this article a worthwhile read.  The evidence suggests that states the vote more solidly Republican are being hit hardest at the pump.  Gasoline expenditures as a share of personal income are higher in pro-Republican states than pro-Democrat states.  Understanding the demographic base of each party as well as population density explains much of this issue: states that are very rural drive greater distances with less public transit option, spending more per capita on gasoline.  Also, since the most affluent urban centers are Democrat-leaning, they spend a less sizeable portion of their income on gasoline.  This article would be a nice resource for a classroom/small group discussion.  

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Siobhan Chantigian's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:39 PM

This is an interesting article about how rising gas prices and how people are going to vote.  

Annie Christofferson's comment, April 27, 2014 6:06 PM
I thought this it was interesting how it said that the states that it really makes a difference in are the ones that don't have as big an impact on the electoral college. It doesn't seem quite fair.