Geography Education
1.6M views | +0 today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: Why is Australia's population so highly clustered?  What is it about the yellow (and white) areas that explain this pattern?  How does this map of rainfall add to our understanding? What other layers of information do we need to properly contextualize this information?   


Just for fun, here is a Buzzfeed list that highlights the dangerous biogeography of Australia.  Maybe this is why people aren't living in the yellow region.   


Tags: AustraliaOceania, population, density.

more...
Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:28 PM

The yellow represents desert and with no rainfall what are you going to grow. the white area is the area that gets plenty of rain, good farmland for raising livestock, excellent natural harbors and resources. the yellow upper part probably is not desert but I bet its cold up there.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:08 PM

this seems like the same sort of situation that Egypt has, it seems like a good sized area but the large deserts make most of it uninhabitable, the country's livable space is much less than you would think.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:17 PM
What we have here is a representation of the desert area that only 2% of the population lives in, this is because to sustain life, you need high amounts of water to grow food which will never happen here and then the white being the mainly inhabited areas. These areas are mainly inhabited because of sufficient rainfall which makes agriculture good and good enough to sustain populations of people.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Maldives

Maldives | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Maldives is a small country in the Indian Ocean composed of 1,200 islands.  Virtually every spot in this country is under 8 feet in elevation.  Pictured above is the capital of Malé, which has the largest population (explore these islands on a variety of scales).   


Questions to Ponder: What physical forces and processes account for the presence of these islands in the Ocean?  In a geological time scale, what does the future hold for these islands.  What would be the main economic assets of the Maldives?  What would be the main economic and environmental concerns of this country?


Tags: density, sustainability, economicenvironment, environment adaptclimate change, urban ecology.

more...
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:54 PM

The creation of the Maldives was a evolutionary process that was created with hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. However most of the 1200 or so islands are disappearing. As many of these islands have been created and built upon, the soils are losing their strength. Now we have a process of erosion not only from rain but also from the sea waves. As this eats away at the islands they are getting smaller and smaller and unless they start bringing in artificial land area they will someday disappear.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:39 PM

The Maldives Islands were created by Hotspots in the Pacific Ocean. Many of the one thousand islands that are there are slowly disappearing. The islands are being destroyed by rain and from sea waves that crash onto the island itself. Soon the land, just like Kiribati will disappear because they just keep shrinking in size more and more. Their economy revolves mostly around tourist money and parts of the islands have been highly developed for high end tourist marketing.  

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 19, 2015 4:33 AM

Honestly a nation like the Maldives would only be possible with today's technology. the lack of resources, land and linking landmass would have made it stuck in an era with villages at best. The modern country if you ask me is also a disaster waiting to happen. Their cities are right on sea level. A single tsunami or storm would devastate them never mind rising sea levels. I just think they are acting unsustainable and their growth without lack of native resources will lead to their nations ultimate failure. While I wish these people success their islands are also eroding due to reefs so geography is pretty much against them at every turn. In the future hopefully a solution to these problems can be found but until then this will likely be an area that will have to be evacuated in the future like many others.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly gorgeous interactive map of population density in the United States.  It is very reminiscent of this North American Map with two major differences.  On the down side, Mexican and Canadian data are not displayed but on the bright side, the added color component is used to show ethnic categories as defined by the 2010 U.S. census.  Please explore this map at a variety of scales and in distinct locales.   


Questions to Ponder: Is this a map of ethnic diversity patterns or is it a map of racial segregation?  How come?  Is there additional information that you would need to decide?  This review of the map on Wired and Atlantic Cities described this map as a map depicting segregation: why would they say that? 


Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, population, density, ethnicity, race.

more...
Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:52 AM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:27 PM

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 2014 12:30 PM

The Wired article's claim that this map depicts racial segregation instead of ethnic diversity can be seen in the patterns found in most of the major cities. While cities like Los Angeles and Las Vegas have many mixed areas containing different colored dots, other cities like Dallas and Atlanta show very clear cut lines between the ethnic makeup of areas. When zoomed out, the map certainly looks segregated with areas clearly marked blue, green, or yellow.

 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Density and Emptiness

Density and Emptiness | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the end of 2012 I travelled to USA to experience something new. And it was something I didn't expect: emptiness and density.  'Merge' is the last part of a project series 'Empty, Dense, Merge' which explores two opposite feelings through the photos of places located in USA.  In this project two opposite places are merged into one: New York City, where, it seems like everyone wants to live there, and Grand Canyon / Death Valley, which are unlivable."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is geographically inspired art at it's finest.  It goes beyond making beautiul jewelry with maps or showing majestic vistas of natural landscapes; the artistic concept that motivated the photographer was geographic in nature.  Population density is highly clustered leaving great spaces of open, empty, unpopulated land and some major cities that are jam-packed with human activity and settlements.  Merging both of these concepts into the same image produced this series of 6 images (as seen in this Atlantic Cities article).


Tags: art, density, NYC, landscape.

more...
oyndrila's comment, July 21, 2013 3:37 AM
Excellent visual resource to convey the concepts.
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:14 PM

Great photo combining the U.S.'s great spaces with its metropolisis'.

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:17 PM
Amazing it almost looks lkike we, in the US, are living in a huge bowl
Suggested by Thomas Schmeling
Scoop.it!

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This NPR article pulls together some great images of dense urban housing as well is some stellar infographics to show the importance of cities to a growing global population. 


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities

more...
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:12 PM

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 2014 7:40 PM

cool

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 22, 2014 11:42 PM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City?

What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Two Yale architects pose the question in an ambitious research project.


"Hsiang and Mendis have increasingly come to believe that the only way to study and plan for our urban planet is to conceptualize its entire population in one seamless landscape – to picture 7 billion of us as if we all lived in a single, massive city."

more...
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:54 PM

I was very exited by the work being done by Bimal Mendis and Joyce Hsiang.  I hear to much on the news and in conversation about over population, energy shortages and brutal living conditions.  Creating a digital interactive medium is the most efficient way to educate the internet consuming public about issues and developments all over the world.  It reminds me of the blue marble picture taken from Apollo 17, the first full color image of our planet.  This image is considered to be the defining moment that awoke the conservation movement and understanding that the earth is our home and should be treated as such.  I cant help hoping a program like “the city of seven billion” will help people to relies we are all one species and from that develop a move beneficial way of coexisting.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

City Life Changes How Our Brains Deal With Distractions

City Life Changes How Our Brains Deal With Distractions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new study finds that urban minds don't pay as much attention to their surroundings unless they're highly engaging.
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's often noted that people from smaller towns prefer a slower pace of life and people from large cities enjoy the hustle and bustle more.  So does the urban environment change how we handle the vast quantity of information in major metropolitan areas?  This article points to data that says it does.  


Tags: rural, housing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

more...
nancercize's curator insight, May 31, 2013 10:03 AM

This helps explain why we are exhausted at the end of the day, and why a walk in the park is so refreshing. We need to make sure city folk have parks nearby.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Transportation and Population

Seth Dixon's insight:

The highway system (and the widespread usage of air conditioning) in the later half of the 20th century dramatically changed the population settlement patterns of the United States and reshaping our cities.

 

Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, unit 7 cities.

more...
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:30 PM

Very Interesting HUGGERS...we didn't always have highways to cruise on!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Census Dotmap

Census Dotmap | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive dot distribution map of the United States 2010 census data has many great applications.  The conversation can focus on the symbology of the map (for example, this could lead to a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of dot distribution maps) or notice how certain physical landforms are visible for either their high or low population density.  One of the advantages of this map is that it uses census data at the block level.  This means that the user can visualize distinct scale-dependent patterns.  Sharp divisions (e.g.-urban vs. rural) might have less of a distinct edge as you zoom in.  

UPDATE: This map now includes Canadian and Mexican census data as well as the United States.


Tags: cartography, technology, mapping, visualization, population, density.

more...
Charlie Koppelson's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:40 PM

This map is very useful in examining the distribution of people and geography in North America. It's easy to see that our once rural based country is completely dominated by cities, most of which are near the coast. It's fun to play around with as you can see where mountain ranges are as well as other topographic changes just by the concentrations of people, or lack there of.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Designs to Fit More People in Every City

TED Talks How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.


This talk is relevant not just because it focuses on many urban issues; it also is a fantastic demonstration of how to use spatial thinking to solve problems.  

 

Tagsdensity, urban, spatial, planning, TED

more...
Mike Carney's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:41 PM

This TED Talk presents some very forward-thinking ideas on urban planning. With cities becoming more and more packed it is important to rethink the way we live and work in cities. Space saving technologies like the fold-up cars and small, changeable apartments seem futuristic but doable. This video challenges the viewer to think about the form and function of cities in new ways. Moving into the future it is important to adapt to the growing congestion in cities by applying new technologies with flexible designs that make cities more livable. I think that the smart apartments are an innovative solution but unlikely to catch on any time soon. I think that the folding cars are more likely to catch on because so many people already use the tiny smart cars and car-sharing services like zip-car are gaining in popularity. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:51 AM

This video is about how we can design a city that is less crowded. What Kent Larson thinks should happen to a city is basically minimize certain aspects of the city. What that means is adding these new ideas of folding cars,quick-change apartments and other innovations that will lessen the cities population and crowdedness. 

Suggested by Tara Cohen
Scoop.it!

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.

more...
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Urban issues: Transportation and Density

Urban issues: Transportation and Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A map that has been making the rounds on the internet demonstrates how you can fit 7 major U.S. cities plus New York's most famous borough within Los Angeles city limits.

 

So Los Angeles is big, but, LA's spatial extent is in part due to it's history with transportation (ripped out the streetcars to let the automobile and freeway take over).  How do density and transportation affect cities? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Radiant City

Radiant City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In this feature length film Gary Burns, Canada's king of surreal comedy, joins journalist Jim Brown on an outing to the suburbs.

 

This 2006 documentary is a critical look at suburbia that has comments from suburbanites interspersed with planners, real estate agents, experts and urban academics. 

more...
Chris St. Clair's comment, April 27, 2012 2:03 PM
I've showed this movie once in a while during the Urban unit and the kids enjoy it. "Edutainment"
Seth Dixon's comment, April 27, 2012 7:09 PM
It seems a mixture of vignettes, with some academic founding mixed in. Warning: There was one F-bomb in the movie.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.


By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

more...
Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:03 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of infographics  is a tremendous visual tool to compare urbanization patterns around the world. 


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Population Density

Population Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."

Seth Dixon's insight:

At NCGE this week, I was pleased to hear a presentation from Alexander Murphy, a giant in the academic world.  He shared this interactive map from Derek Watkins, which is the best map I've ever seen to teach global population distribution patterns.  It is removed all extraneous information and allows the user to focus on the areas of heavy settlement and limited population.  The map can show regions that are settled at densities from 15 to 500 people per square mile; the changes at various densities are visually staggering and powerfully telling. I've shared some other maps that would work very nicely together with this in a lesson on global population settlement patterns.   


Tags: density, populationvisualization, mapping.

more...
Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?


Seth Dixon's insight:

I present this map (hi-res) without any context to my students and ask the question: is this statement true?  How can we ascertain the truthfulness of this claim?  What fact would we need to gather?  This exercise sharpens their critical thinking skills and harnesses the assorted bits of regional information that they already have, and helps them evaluate the statement.

The answers to these questions can be found here.

 

Tags: density, social media, East Asia, South Asia.

more...
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 2:12 PM

After discussing this picture in class, I know that the statement is true.  I find it incredible that the majority of the world's population lives inside that circle.  I can't even imagine how condense living space must be.  I again am finding myself very fortunate to live where and how I do. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:25 PM

After analyzing this map and looking at the busiest cities and countries in the world I believe this statement to be true. China a giant and very populated country, India is also within the top ten and so is Japan. Once all these have been looked at you can clearly tell that this area of the world is easily the most populated. Many of the other countries and nations have large swaths of land that are very lightly populated. This is a robust area of the world and in some cases the most expansive.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:33 PM
It surprises me how many people live in just that one circle! it is hard to believe or probably explain to someone that with all the other space in the world, that the circles region has more people in it than what is not circled. Although, it could be validated by more reliable or more sources, because with the world that we live in now, numbers can easily be forged. I do believe though that 51% of the world's population does live here.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).
Seth Dixon's insight:

These apartments are so small that they can only be photographed from the ceiling.  Massive urbanization with limited space means that real estate is at a premium and many laborers will not be able to afford large living spaces.  Hong Kong is an extreme example of this and it brings new meaning to the term "high-density housing." 


Tagshousing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

more...
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:47 PM

(in-class 4: Hong Kong)

What I take away from this is the theme of supply and demand. Though these condiions seem stereotypically negative, it seems like those who live in the photographed homes are relatvely well off (food, TV, clothing, etc.). This supports the view that living in these tight conditions is less of a choice and more of something that has to be put up with. Now that Hong Kong has been developed 'across', it'd be a good guess to say that recently investments have been made to build 'up' with highrises and skyscrapers (unless like Dubai they sat to mak either own islands, whic geographically would be less likely here). The questionof sustainability is also an issue, i.e. at what point will it be impossible to cram in any more inhabitants? I wonder if a future migration / spreading-out into other areas has started to occur yet or will soon, like the suburbanization which occured in the U.S. after the advent of the automobile. If so, would it be mainland China, despite the political tensions?

Suggested by C. Kevin Turner
Scoop.it!

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   


Tags: Bangladesh, water, pollution, poverty, squatter, planning, density, South Asia, development, economic, megacities.

more...
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are many types of housing development patterns throughout the world.  This article provides a summary of approximately 20 different housing patterns common in the United States with a visual example demonstrate the impact on the urban footprint (Pictured above is an example of new urbanism in Boulder, CO).  Each neighborhood has distinct cultural amenities and attracts particular socioeconomic market segments. 


Questions to Ponder: What housing patterns are you drawn to?  How come?  What are the advantages for the residents to live in that type of community?  What are the impacts that the housing pattern has on the physical environment and the urban system?  What systems are most profitable for developers?  How does the layout of the neighborhood alter the sense of place?  

   

Tagshousing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

more...
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Public Transit and Density

Public Transit and Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This image is an excellent visualization to use when teaching about density, public transportation and urban planning. 


Questions to Ponder: How is this a persuasive image?  Do you argee with the argument that the planning office is making? Are there something important factors that this image ignores?


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

more...
Imran Ahmed Khan's comment, January 17, 2013 3:44 PM
Good picture! It defines the growth of the city that impact on urbanization rate, public health, socioeconomic environment. It also tell us that if we reduce vehicles on the road more space and clean environment may we get, that reduce motality and morbadity of several disease especially lung diseases.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:31 PM

What are the benefits for each?  Drawbacks? You decide!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.


This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?


Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   


Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.

more...
Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 1:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
Suggested by Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
Scoop.it!

Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 

more...
Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

This is from 'worldmapper' - it is a great sight to help you understand using technology the most densely populated areas of various countries. What do you think they are? 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going

Kids Who Get Driven Everywhere Don't Know Where They're Going | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new study suggests vehicular travel affects children's ability to navigate their neighborhood and connect to their community.

 

We learn about the places around us by exploring.  Literally our mental map is formed by making choices (in part through trial and error) and that process strengthens our spatial perception of the neighborhood.  Research is showing that kids with a 'windshield perspective' from being driven everywhere are not able to draw as accurate maps as children for who walk and bike their neighborhood.  The built environment and the transportation infrastructure in place play a role in developing spatial thinking skills for young minds. 

 

This is a compelling article with some important implications.  What are the ramifications for geographers?  City planners? Educators?  Families moving to a new neighborhood?   

more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:52 AM

We may not realize it but when we take our kids out on drives to run errands or if we move to a different area we are ruining their understanding of the area they live in. Children often have a hard time of figuring out where they are if they constantly in a car looking at new places. This can cause them to lack a sense of direction and maybe have trouble remembering streets or landmarks near their homes.