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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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So you want to form your own state? It may take a while

So you want to form your own state? It may take a while | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Voters in five Colorado counties said on Tuesday they want to form their own state.  But the breakaway regions face almost impossible constitutional and political obstacles. The North Colorado movement supporters claim that their counties have little in common with more urbanized parts of the state, and they are unhappy with state-wide laws about gun control and energy standards. 

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are other secessionist movements, and other ways the states might have formed, but these are all very unlikely.  There's that little document called the Constitution that makes these movements impractical.  

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:26 AM

movements to secceed and create their own state is a popular idea but will not be easy because of the political and cultural implications. Already exisiting states would become smaller and turn into smaller autonmous states. in the long run it may be more to manage because we would not more representatives and senators to represent this additional state. THe independant states may have more states but could become a headache for the 50 original states we already have.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 10:27 AM

Theres an old saying that fits well with this article and its "if its not broke dont fix it" theres no major problem with having some demographicial differences in a state. Sure Nor Cal and So Cal may be nothing alike but that doesnt mean they need to officially seperate. Thanks to the constitution the seperation of a state/ forming of a state isnt a easy proccess, because if it was there would be endless amounts of states in this country because no 2 people share the exact same opinion.

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How Many Countries Are There?

Seth Dixon's insight:

What makes a country a country?  There isn't just one definition that is universally excepted as to what a country is; that make the first question even harder to answer.  Exploring these terms though is incredibly geographic and highlights some of the lesser known but fascinating places that are mired in geopolitical quanderies.


If you haven't discovered CGP Grey yet, his YouTube channel is a veritable fountain of geographic tidbits.  His distinctive style helps to contextualizes some of the more odd and complicated parts of the Earth (but some find the rush of facts disorienting).  


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, CGP Grey.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:44 AM

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 9:44 AM

193....except........

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Argentina renews Falklands claims

Argentina renews Falklands claims | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner renews her claims for sovereignty of the Falklands at a UN Security Council meeting.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Are they the Falklands or Las Malvinas?  It's not just a simple linguistic translation but also a statement of territoriality and geopolitical recognition.  This article nicely summarizes the current situation. For a great teaching resource on the historical ebbs and flows in this longstanding dispute between Argentina and the UK, see the second slideshow in this series of  AP Human Geography talks that was given at NCGE earlier this month. 


Tags: Argentinaborders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 10, 2013 2:44 PM

Malvinas. 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 30, 2013 11:10 AM

Im old enough to remember this conflict when Thatcher sent the British to retake the islands.  Both sides are claiming the islands for themselves.  Seems they were uninhabited when discovered by the French and then it was British, Spanish, French, Argentinan, and British again in 1833 until the militray invasion by Agrentina in 1982 and the retaking of the island by the British that same year.  Claims on both sides seem legitimate, but I find it most telling that the people now living there want to be part of Great Britian, not Argentina.  The people of mainland Argentina might want the islands, economic reasons and for the EEZ, but the people actully living on the island do not.  Another thing I do remember, the US was not with Great Britian at thie time in an unusual split between long term and stanuch allies

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:10 PM

I think that countries trying to unite and make claims is sort of like going to a bad college party in a station wagon with people that you might not like, don't like you, and are not like you... At least in the case of the USA.  As for Argentina, well I hope they're not as ravishly divided as the united of the constituents of America.  I don't really have anything good to say about this country... I have been physically and psychologically abused by police, damaged and violated by medical establishments, and I'm really sick of other people acting like they have the god-given right or my permission to treat me less than pleasantly.  How does this relate to Argentina requesting sovereignty? Well, I relate my personal experience to their situation in that they might be better off sovereign than being operated on by deranged fugitive doctors or beaten up by cops in bad relationships... so to speak.  For a lack of sovereignity would pose negative things that might befall their people.  I think that there is a greater chance for greater things to happen to them if they do it alone, rather than being told what to do, or being thought through and puppetted by other countries!

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It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

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Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

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The Conflict Zone

The Conflict Zone | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In a new series of four eight-minute videos, National Geographic Emerging Explorer Aziz Abu Sarah is a cultural educator working to build relationships between Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem and throughout Israel. In this series of four eight-minute videos, Abu Sarah meets with people from both sides of the conflict in order to better understand and communicate how this international dispute impacts their everyday lives."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: Israel, borders, Palestine, territoriality, political, Middle East.

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Border Walls

Border Walls | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Geographer Reece Jones discusses his recent book Border Walls, examining the history of how and why societies have chosen to literally wall themselves apart.  He gives a brief history of political maps, how international lines reshape landscapes, and how the trend towards increased border wall construction contrasts with the view of a “borderless” world under globalization."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This 30-minute audio podcast is a great preview of Reece Jones' book Border Walls; and discusses many concepts important to political geography.  The physical construction of barriers is an old practice (Great Wall of China, Hadrian's Wall), but those borders were the exceptions.  The recent proliferatrion of walls to separate countries is dramatically reshaping our borders and impacting economics, politics, migration and other geographic patterns (How recent? Over half of the borders with walls and fences we see today have been constructed since 2000). Although walls are often justified as a means to prevent terrorism, most of the world's walls can best be explained as dividing wealthy and relatively poorer countries to prevent migration (download podcast episode here).  You can also read his New York Times article on the same topic.   


Tags: book reviews, podcast, borders, political, landscape, states, territoriality, sovereignty.

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Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 10:37 AM
Wow....
Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 10:37 AM
Wow... your comment is really long Chris.........
Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 9:00 AM
listening to some of the podcast you can get an in-depth synopsis of this. the walls that divide our countries and even towns over time have all the criteria and/or reasoning. Great Wall of China to keep invaders from starting war, Berlin Wall to divide german supporters of war, America/Mexican boarder is to keep illegal immigrants from coming, fence in your moms backyard is to keep neighbors/animals out of yard. Walls all have the same concept of avoiding war, trespassers and privacy. this is seen in not only everyday living but in military use as well.
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The Golan Heights

The Golan Heights | Geography Education | Scoop.it

In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since then some of the Syrian rebels have also been reported operating in Golan Heights.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article (orginally featured on maps101.com, the educational wing of maps.com) is a great starting point for learning about the geopolitical significance of the Golan Heights.  


Tags: SyriaMiddleEast, conflict, Israel, borders, political.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, April 3, 2013 9:10 AM

This map can be used to illustrate not only the political and cultural significance of the Golan Heights, but also its environmental significance as a source of water for the Jordan-Yarmuk River Valley

Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:35 PM

Heres some info on how poeple have been living in regards to a troubled area of the world.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 9:08 AM

This article stresses the importance of geography when discussing political situation with neighboring countries.  The fact that the heights are such a strategic advantage to whoever owns them explains why they are so contested.  As long as these two countries are not friendly nations this disagreement over the strategic point will continue.

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If Economists Controlled The Borders

If Economists Controlled The Borders | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What would the perfect immigration system look like? We asked three economists to dream big.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an intriguing podcast focused on how to best manage national borders if the only goal were to strengthen the economy (they center the conversatri on the United States).  These economists envision plans with more incentives to attract a labor force that is more highly-skilled is crucial to having a rational migration policy.  How how you manage the borders if you were in charge?  How would your plan strengthen the country?  

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Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 6-minute video clip is a good way to help students understand the ethnic and geopolitical context of the Mali conflict.  What impact did the superimposed borders of colonialism have in creating the conflict? 


Tags: Mali, Africa, borders, political, conflict, war, colonialism, National Geographic.

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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 6, 2013 6:37 AM

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 12:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As a geographer native to the San Diego region (with family on both sides of the border), I found this article very compelling.  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  Herzog analyses three distinct factors that have shape the landscape of the California-Mexico border zone: urbanization, NAFTA, and global interruptions (9/11).    


Tags: borders, AAG, political, landscape, California, unit 4 political, Mexico.

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 6:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:46 AM

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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Mali in Crisis

Mali in Crisis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
France is ready to stop Islamist militants who control northern Mali, the French president says, following a plea for help by his Malian counterpart.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In April 2012, Islamist rebels seized power in Northern Mali and have declared independence, proclaiming this region The Islamic State of Azawad.  Recently they have begun to amass armies on the southern limits of their territory and presumably are seeking to topple all of Mali.  The former colonizer, France is being called upon to assist as is the United Nations.  This area is part of a region known as the Sahel, the transition from a dry North Africa to tropical Sub-Saharan Africa, from a Muslim/Arab north to a Christian/Animist/Black region of Africa.  The human and physical geographic divisions in this region plays a major role in this conflict.  


Tags: Mali, Africa, political, conflict, war.

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Josephine Castro's curator insight, September 12, 2013 2:35 AM

Islamist militants control Northern Mali

 

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:41 AM

What also was very dangerous about this was that Mali became a safe haven for terrorist groups such as Al-Qaeda,  because of their Islamic ties to the rebels.  If we allow them to control this region, who knows what they could plan.  We spent all this time making them run, giving them a new base would undo a lot of work that has been done in the past 12 years. 

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Israel and Palestine

Watch this Jewish Voice for Peace 6 minute mini-primer about why Israelis and Palestinians are fighting..

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth.  In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.   

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

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Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2012 9:51 PM
I must admit, I did struggle on whether to post it or not. In the video the use of term 'indigenous people' to refer to the Palestinians bothered me as did a few other references, but I did feel it tried to be accurate even if their political perspective was obvious.
I would most certainly be open to posting something more pro-Israeli since I'm not trying to advocate a particular point or push a perspective, but I did think it was a good, is somewhat flawed resource. It's near impossible to find anything without bias so I decided that sharing some flawed sources is better than not sharing any on a pretty weighty topic.
Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 1:16 PM

This video from the Jewish Voice for Peace has a more politically motivated angle than most of the resources that I post on this site, but I feel that they do justice to both sides as well as the truth.  In a simple way it lays out the roots of many of the problems in the region with historic and geographic perspectives.   

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:34 PM

This video is a really helpful, simplified explanation of the fighting in Israel that is fiercely complicated and has gone on for decades now with one repressed group repressing another. If I ever need to explain the struggle to students, this video would be an excellent introduction.

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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...


Seth Dixon's insight:


Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map diplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you think the sub-text to this map is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post


Tags: cartography, China, borders.

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Indian Independence and the Question of Partition

The partition of 1947, which led to the creation of India and Pakistan, was one of the most volatile events of the twentieth century. Partition coincided with the end of British colonial rule over the subcontinent, and Indian independence was overshadowed by violence, mass displacement, and uncertainty.

The scholars in this video were interviewed for the Choices Program curriculum, "Indian Independence and the Question of Partition". For more information, visit the Choices Program.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 13, 2013 3:23 PM

This issue was partition was very disheartening for the movement involving passive resistance. They paid a great price to remove Brittish rule but unfortuntaley could not keep the nation together under a united Hinduism and Muslim rule. Ghandi specifically was very sad. They insisted that the Hindus would enslave the muslims so they needed two seperate states india and Pakistan. The nation of Bangledesh. is also descendant of India people as well,1947 set the tone for what happened in the US CIvil rights movement with Dr. King. Before the partiton agreement with Britian, they were able to demonstrate that social change could be achieved in this revolutionary way.

steve smith's curator insight, November 13, 2013 4:38 PM

Great for Level One Geography - population studies

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:44 PM

Cant watch this because of privacy settings?

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Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement

Take This State And Shove It: The New Secession Movement | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Residents of rural areas feel shut out of their states' politics, so why not create their own?
Seth Dixon's insight:

One county commission discribed these political movements thus: "It's grounded in the legitimate feeling that if you're marginalized by geography, it's easy to feel neglected by the central government."  The political division between urban and rural citizens can lead to pockets of the population feeling as though the state government ignores your and the surrounding communities.  It took the Civil War to separate West Virginia from Virginia, and while many may want to be in a different state, it's not happening simply because there is grassroots support for greater local autonomy.  Hypothetically, let's say that many new states are generated; what consequences might come of this?  Would it leading to further gerrymandering?      


Tags: political, conflict, devolution, autonomy, bordersgerrymandering.

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 18, 2013 2:25 PM

On election day this year, several Colorado counties voted on whether to secede from Colorado and create a new state. Many of the counties voted in favor of the idea. (See the link below for more info on the Colorado secession movement.) This is not the first time groups of Americans have considered (and voted on) breaking away from their state. When political issues come up and decisions are made by the government and/or the people, some get their way and others do not. The article explains one way that some people have decided to take action when they do not feel their interests are being served.

 

BONUS for my students:

1) What steps do you think should be taken before people consider seceding from their state?  

2) What are some possible pros and cons of breaking away from a state to create a new one?  

3) Hypothetically speaking, what would it take for you to want to create a new state?

 

Here is the link to the article about Colorado's secession movement:

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/colorado-rural-voters-approve-secession-idea-20850962

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:43 PM

Some states urban and rural areas have had differences and beliefs when it comes to politics. For example Virginia and West Virginia have had their differences and this is what has caused them to seperate. If every state did this there would be too much craziness because im sure each state would have a different belief and nobody would agree on anything. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 7:57 PM

This article is about segments of California, Colorado, and Oregon wanting to separate and become their own states so their voices can be heard in Congress.

 

If, hypothetically, new states were formed out of existing ones this kind of gerrymandering would likely only lead to even more new states. It might even lead to a secession arms race to gain more Democrat and Republican seats in the Senate. With so many new states, it could lead to increased division, with no Democrat or Republican wanting to set foot in an opposition’s state. In the long run though, political affiliations do eventually change and we would have a precedent analogous to attempting to take the ball home when the other kids don't want to play the same game as you, which is not how a democratic republic works.

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Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video and article briefly show the reasons behind the current tension between Spain, NATO allies and fellow EU members.  The deeper, underlying issues though are all fundamentally rooted in the complex local political geography.  As an exclave of the UK on a peninsula connected to the Spanish mainland that controls access to the Mediterranean Sea, there is naturally going to be friction over this unusual political configuration. Spain, in what the chief Minister of Gibraltar calls "sabre-rattling," is flexing its muscles and considering using their border and airspace as a political leverage.  Spain is upset that Gibraltar has created an artificial reef in waters that their fishermen use.  Spanish fisherman have recently condemned the escalating political rhetoic.


Questions to Ponder: Why are both parties politically and culturally invested in this piece of territory?  What challenges are there for a small exclave when neighbors aren't friendly?  How does Spanish and British suprantional connections impact this issue?


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, Spain, Europe, autonomy.

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karenpinney's curator insight, August 12, 2013 5:13 AM

Relationships between Britain and Spain.

megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

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Bizarre Borders

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you haven't discovered CGP Grey yet, his YouTube channel is a veritable fountain of geographic tidbits.  His distinctive style helps to contextualizes some of the more odd and complicated parts of Earth's borders.   If you want another example, watch Bizarre Borders, part 1 which focuses on countries within countries and single-neighbor countries.


Tags: borders, political, North America.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 30, 7:29 PM

Glad to see two countries like Canada and America can get along over these bizarre borders. I think many countries in the Middle East would fight over those small pieces of land. I think we avoid violence over these borders because we have such a good relationship with Canada.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 7:28 PM

The video highlights a bunch irregularities along the US/Canadian border. Among them, the zigzag 49th not-so-parallel, a small island which is actually a disputed territory, and another US island which is far closer to Canada than it is Washington state causing high school students to have to cross international borders four times to attend school.



This is an interesting video in that it shows how even in the recent past how difficult it was to clearly and conclusively delineate the border between the US and Canada. The fact that there is still a disputed island between two very friendly nations. This only makes it more clear why much older, less friendly nations would have heated disputes over territory.

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 9:46 AM

Did you know the geometric boundary between US and Canada (the longest border in the world) is also a physical border? Check it out.

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Choices Program--Scholars Online

Choices Program--Scholars Online | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Scholars Online Videos feature top scholars answering a specific question in his or her field of expertise. These brief and informative videos are designed to supplement the Choices Program curricula.

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this Scholar's Online video, Jennifer Fluri briefly answers this question: How has Afghanistan's geography affected its history?  This video nicely shows how contested international disputes have geographic dimensions to them.  The very borders of Afghanistan were created out of geopolitical maneuverings.


Tags: Afghanistanborders, politicalculture, Central Asia, historical, colonialism. 

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, May 14, 2013 5:57 PM

about The Middle East and frontiers: a short video to better understand this country's history. 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 23, 2013 1:36 PM

If you take a look back at history, the only people to ever sucessfully conquer Afghanistan were the Mongols.  The rugged, mountainous terrain made this plac hard to live in and hard to control.  The Mongols were a very mobile people and were able to control the area by aslo being very tolerant of the natives.  Eventually it bacame hard to notice the difference between a Mongol and a native Afghan, they assimilated the Mongols. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 11:19 PM

These videos explain how the northern and southern borders of Afghanistan were created so no part of the great empires of Russia and the United Kingdom would touch. The two superpowers artificially dictated the borders which has caused conflicts. British India historically had used money and influence to support and indirectly rule Afghanistan to provide a buffer zone between its valuable colony of India and Russia while keeping their Indian subjects docile and secure.

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Regions of Interaction

Regions of Interaction | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Put away that old Rand McNally map — it's time for a new way to see what America really looks like.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a great series of maps in this NPR article that show that internal political divisions do not always line up with actual regional interactions.  The map of the United States shows the what money flows within regions that do not always follow state borders (see Wisconsin, Idaho and Pennsylvania).  The map of Great Britain shows the connections based on telephone calls.

 

TagsUSA, UK, borders, mapping, regions.

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East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, Japan, East Asia.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the geopolitical conflicts in the East Pacific have their roots in the territorial disputes over islands that at first glance seem as if they wouldn't be worth the trouble.  However, since the the UNCLOS agreement gives countries 200 nautical miles off their coasts to be an Exclusive Economic Zone, that greatly enhanced the strategic value of controlling these islands. 

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Catherine Shabo's curator insight, April 21, 2013 9:32 PM

There is a big lesson to be learned from this map and what it means. No territory on this earth is completely not valuable. Specifically ones with long coast lines and natural resources. This shows how Geography comes into play with economic profit. Now, if this division is not working for the East Pacific then the ideal thing would be to divide it equally. But, that never works does it..

megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:43 AM

" Asia is willing to go to war with small islands in order to gain full control and rights of the ocean borders. China is very assertive and aggressive. They even go to the extreme as to use boats to hit Vietnamese and Phillipino ships to show that the ocean is theirs. It is all because countries or islands with a coastline are to have rights over their land and 200 nautical miles as well. It is just becoming a problem because how do you evenly distribute or differentiate who's is who's."

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

Suggested by Tara Cohen
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Enclaves

Enclaves | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world
Seth Dixon's insight:

This website is an exhaustive list with information on the world's enclaves that are so often entangled in geopolitical issues.  


Tags: borderspolitical, unit 4 political.

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Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:18 PM
Very interesting!
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:32 AM
Mondialisation et frontières... et sur cette carte mon imminente destination de vacances: l'enclave omanaise de Musandam.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:46 PM

Enclaves of the world HUGGERS....review!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love this time-lapse animation of all the county and state-level boundary changes in United States history.  Would you like to see this in greater detail?  Would you want to download the data and create your own visualization of this?  The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries has all of this data as GIS shapefiles, Google Earth KMZ files and PDFs for the whole country as well as for each individual state.  This project sponsored by The Newberry and the National Endowment for the Humanities has tremendous potential for use in the classroom for history and geography teachers alike.  


Tags: historical, USA, borders, time lapse, mapping, edtech.

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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 29, 2013 6:53 PM

I am interested in US History and watching the creation of the boundaries with the year that they were created gives a lot of insight into the people and population of that time. Also the rate of change in size from year to year gives insight into the economic and political status of the country at that time. This is a great clip to watch even if just to see how much the country has physically changed over time.

Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Suggested by Tara Cohen
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How The States Got Their Shapes

Amazon.com: How The States Got Their Shapes: Season 1, Episode 10 "Mouthing Off": Amazon Instant Video
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many have raved about the TV show airing on the History Channel "How the States got their Shapes."  For Amazon Prime users, season 1 is now free to stream.   I'm looking forward to watching this.

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Tara Cohen's comment, January 14, 2013 11:33 AM
We show this episode in class to demonstrate standard language, dialects, divergence, isogloss, etc. Once you purchase it through Amazon it remains in your library with unlimited use. It's short enough to show in one class period and the kids really enjoy it.
Seth Dixon's comment, January 14, 2013 10:01 PM
Great ideas Tara. I think that each episode will be filled with applicable teaching materials.
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Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border

Crowdsourcing an Israeli-Palestinian Border | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A new interactive tool allows you to decide how many Israeli settlers to annex and what constitutes a viable Palestinian state.


This article from the Atlantic is a great introduction to a mapping tool that puts the user at the virtual negotiation table.  Peace talk proposals often center around the amount of land that Palestinians want and the Jewish settlements in the West Bank that the Israelis want as a part of the state of Israel.  This interactive, titled Is Peace Possible?, allows the user to propose potential land swaps, see the demographic breakdown of West Bank settlements and videos to introduce users to on 4 major issues: borders, security, refugees and Jerusalem. 


Tags: Israel, borders, Palestine, territoriality, political, mapping

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Cartography And Conflict

Cartography And Conflict | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A newly issued Chinese passport featuring a map that lays claim to disputed territory with several neighboring countries is only the latest case of cartographic aggression.


"Maps, like statistics, can lie — or at least tell only one side of the story. As often as not, they can belie the level of actual governmental control or the ethnic and social realities on the ground. And competing views over 'who owns what' invariably fuel nationalistic fervor."

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:22 PM

Maps can lie, or at least only tell one side of a story. China sparked an international uproar over their new passports that features a map of China. The map includes territories claimed by India, Vietnam, the Philippines and Taiwan.