Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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For the Love of Maps

For the Love of Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I have a confession to make; I’m a map geek. Even as a kid watching Raiders of the Lost Ark, I was fascinated by the map they used to segue between scenes to show Indiana Jones’ travels.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I hope you enjoy this article; I enjoyed writing it.  I write about my map geekiness (does that surprise anyone out there?), share my place-based videos StoryMap with over 60 of my favorite classroom videos, and why teaching kids to appreciate the value of maps is important.  All of my future articles for National Geographic Education will be archived here at this link


Tags: National Geographicmapping, edtech.

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Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 2014 11:05 AM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography

 

This article shows that people often still love maps. Some people grow out of map loving as a teenager and it is not as popular for people to like them anymore. This article tells haw maps are being pushed out of style and how it is hurting our intelligence.

 

This ties into human geography through the fact that it is needed to have a passion for geographical thinking to even get into Human Geography. This shows how not learning about mas can drastically hurt and is drawing away from the geographical field.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:57 PM

Anything by Dr. Seth is worth reading!

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:02 AM

I'm taking World Regional Geography because I love maps as well. I am more of a visual learner rather than a verbal learner. In my spare time, I like to map out my dream restaurants and my dream home and turning it into a map itself helps me understand locations in the easiest way. It also helps me identify one area's size and shape in comparison to other's.

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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | Geography Education | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.
Seth Dixon's insight:

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates.   You can hear more about Tristram's work in this TED talk


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

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Deborah Jones's curator insight, October 25, 2014 9:58 AM

PSA

Rebecca McClure's curator insight, November 15, 2014 11:13 PM

Year 9: Food Security

Alex Lewis's curator insight, November 21, 2014 12:18 PM

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos

Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A herd of hippopotamuses once owned by the late Colombian drug baron Pablo Escobar has been taking over the countryside near his former ranch - and no-one quite knows what to do with them."

Seth Dixon's insight:

An important idea in biogeography is the concept of invasive species. An invasive species is an organism that is not indigenous to an area but causes great economic or environmental harm to the new area as it quickly adapts and alters the ecosystem.   Colombia's hippopotamus herd certainly qualifies as an interesting example to share with students of unintended ecological consequences that occur through human and environmental interactions.  For further explorations into invasive species, see this National Geographic lesson plan.   

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, Colombia, National Geographic.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 1, 2014 6:30 PM

Ecosystem imbalance

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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Great Green Wall initiative is composed of 11 countries that are cooperating together to combat the physical and human geographic characteristics that make the Sahel one of the more vulnerable ecosystems in the world.  This swath running through Africa is the transition zone where tropical Africa meets the Sahara.  The Sahel is susceptible to drought, overgrazing, land degradation and desertification.  These issues of resource management and land use transcend international borders so this "Green Wall" was created with the intent to protect the environment, landscapes and people of the Sahel from desert encroachment (as an aside, the Green Wall spatially corresponds nicely with the apocryphal Mountains of Kong). 


Tags: Africa, development, environment, waterbiogeography, ecology, environment depend, physical, weather and climate, supranationalism, political ecology.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:53 PM

The great green wall initiative project, is a project which wants to plant tens of thousands of trees, roughly fifty thousand trees alone in Senegal. The point of this is to restore a failing  environment. Around five hundred million people are living in a desertification area. Both human and nature is at fault for this creation of a transition zone getting bigger and bigger, Humans are not necessarily taking care of the land like it should be taken care of and as for factors of nature such as climate change, drought and not enough rain. There are social impacts that may affect the area too, experts think that improvements in land and economy may help curb terrorism in Mali. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:59 PM

The great green wall is a way of separating the desert from the rain forest in Africa The Sahel is the area that separates the deforestation and the desert and would be a way to keep the desert in a different climatic region of the country.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:40 PM

this a great i think, the only way that countries in an area with such harsh environments can survive is by helping eachother and using their own beneficial land to help other and recieve help for their own deficiencies. 

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Using State Maps in School

Using State Maps in School | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Have you ever seen a map and marveled over all of the information that it contains? It is incredible how maps can capture so much of the real world and depict so many places. From big cities to small towns, maps use characteristics such as topography, hydrography, industry, and recreation to tell the story of a place."

Seth Dixon's insight:

National Geographic Education has just finished producing all 50 State Tabletop Mapmaker kits which focus on basic mapping skills for younger audiences.  This set of tiled 8.5 x 11 sheets really expands what you can do and to help educators know what to do with these resources, they wrote this article that shows 9 ways to use these new state maps in your classroom.  I'm looking forward to printing off the Rhode Island state map!


TagsNational Geographic, mapping, K12.

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:03 PM

Using maps in school is a concern for many educators that know the value of map skills. This article romanticizes maps and the importance of maps and studying them.

Maps are important for location as they can show absolute location to relative location and help with mental maps.

miya harris's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:10 AM

I think that it is very smart to show large scale maps in schools.Large scale maps can help students to understand their locations better because they can see them in greater detail.Roads,buildings,and water element become more clear.I think every school should have a large scale map to help students better under stand their town, county, or state.

Rachael Johns's curator insight, August 21, 2014 9:31 PM

This is a great idea because students will be able to learn more with the hands on action. Most students just write or copy down notes that they don't really pay attention to but with this the student is more likely to learn from it because they have to measure out where to put the location, name the place that they're plotting, and put the note beside it about why it's important. This will also help students learn the location of places better because they're the ones actually making the map.     ~ R.J ~

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Changing Earth

Changing Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video from National Geographic goes nicely with some of my recent posts about the dramatic changes that can be seen as some cities have exploded on the international scene.  The changes in metropolitan areas are dramatically presenting using satellite imagery in this great teaching video. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:29 PM

A great illustation of the changes to the environment as a result of increasing technology and population. Plays for 1minute 30.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:34 PM

A short but fascinating illustration of the rapid changes to areas of teh Earth, observed by astronauts since 2000. Plays for 1 minute 30.  

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 4, 2014 7:46 AM
This is a great resource for some of our science classes. It is an interesting presentation of the changes that we are making over time.
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Geography Awareness Week

Geography Awareness Week | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Launched in 1987 by presidential proclamation, Geography Awareness Week is an annual opportunity for families and schools to engage in fun, educational experiences that draw attention to geo-literacy and the importance of geographic understanding.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Geography Awareness Week is right around the corner (Nov. 18-22)!  The Theme is GEOGRAPHY AND THE NEW AGE OF EXPLORATION.  Here are some resources that we are using in Rhode Island.  What is your local Geographic Alliance doing?  If you don't know, now is a great time to join.  

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futureworks's curator insight, November 15, 2013 8:08 AM

For more detail about USA application process visit  http://www.futureworks.co.in/">&nbsp

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The Geography and Literacy Connection

The Geography and Literacy Connection | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What do you think of when you hear the word literacy? Depending on what you teach, chances are geography is not the first thought that comes to mind. But believe it or not, geography and literacy naturally share many similarities. And you can deepen students’ learning in both geography and literacy when they are integrated in the curriculum."

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Ana Melo's curator insight, November 4, 2013 9:41 AM

Geography provides a lot of fundamental knowledge and gives you also a sense of place, which I find very relevant in times of globalization where you belong everywhere and nowhere simultaneously.

Chris Cividino's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:06 AM

Understanding key terminology in geography is paramount to demonstrating deep knowledge of geographical concepts.

Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:45 PM

In this report, a researcher describes the relationship between geography and literacy on educational terms. When combined, these two very similar topics would provide major benefits to a child curriculum in school giving them a better insight on geography through literary concepts. These certain concepts help kids better recognize relationships within graphs and charts that give valuable geographic information. This article helps prove geography as a field of inquiry based on its relations with other subjects that help enhance the knowledge among the children in any school curriculum. 

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The Great Nature Project

The Great Nature Project | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Join me and National Geographic's Great Nature Project in exploring the great nature all around us!
Seth Dixon's insight:

Join National Geographic in celebrating the great nature all around us! Go outside and snap a photo of plants and animals you find. Upload photos with #GreatNature. Add #animal to animal photos. View photos from around the world at greatnatureproject.org.


Tags: biogeography, National Geographic. images.

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Tracy Klug's curator insight, September 30, 2013 3:07 PM

Join me in submitting pictures to National Geographic's Great Nature Project!  You could submit them to me personally so that I can show the images to my Human Geography students!

Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:52 PM

I am requesting you do this and send me a copy of your pictures as well!

 

Janet Price's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:41 PM

Something for that class set of cameras!

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National Geographic Found

National Geographic Found | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.  We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location."

Seth Dixon's insight:

How have I not found National Geographic FOUND until now?  The curators post approximately 2 pictures a day that generally have never been published before; the result is an archive that is a wonderfully eclectic treasure trove.  There are simply too many great teaching images to share them individually.  Pictured above is the Sutherland Falls which thunders down a 1,904-foot drop from Lake Quill in New Zealand (January 1972, Photo by James L. Amos).  I consider National Geographic FOUND as a must see and will include it in my list of best scoops (filed under the tag zbestofzbest). 


Tags: perspective, National Geographic. images, zbestofzbest.

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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:27 AM

I think that is a manigficient photo i can't believe that these phoos nev been published and also missing their original location.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:31 AM

These pictures are awesome. It would be nice to know the locations of some of the pictures to compare them to images now.

 

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:05 PM

this is amazing!

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Geography/Common Core Webinar

Geography/Common Core Webinar | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If you're concerned about Common Core and how geography fits in then don't miss this informative event. We'll dive into resources that were designed to expand the definition of text, show the alignment between the ELA common core standards and Geography for Life along with suggesting teaching ideas. This presentation will focus on the ELA and Geography Interconnections document that was created to support educators. The session will also highlight the National Geographic Common Core website and the resources available. Join us for a look into Common Core Standards and Geography Education!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

NCGE and National Geographic Education have partnered to bring you the first free partnership webinar of the 2013-2014 NCGE Webinar Series!  This webinar is tomorrow evening (Wednesday August 28th, 9:00pm EDT) so register ASAP!  I've posted some resources in the past about how geography and the Common Core can be aligned; this webinar will pull together years of work to ensure that geography does not get squeezed out of the curriculum.  


Tags: common coreEnglishNCGE, National Geographic, geography education, teacher training.

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leon portman's curator insight, August 27, 2013 2:28 PM

!

Kelsea Messina's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:18 PM

professional development!

ParentPreppers's curator insight, August 31, 2013 7:28 AM

Looks interesting...

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What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps?

What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The common-core standards present an ambiguous message on how to draw information from maps and charts, Phil Gersmehl says.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Written by Phil Gersmehl, the author of Teaching Geography, this article shows how teachers can read maps to gather contextual information about places in a way that fosters deeper learning.  The Common Core ELA standards emphasize a "close reading," but the examples of reading of maps and charts are often rather superficial.  The National Geographic has recently produced Connections to be a guide for teachers of both geography and English to see how the two are interrelated and to promote geo-literacy for a more profound appreciation for spatial analysis and place-based knowledge.    


TagsEnglish, National Geographic, geography education, spatial, teacher training, mapping.

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mufidmmn's comment, July 24, 2013 4:08 AM
ngapain itu ya
Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:38 PM

This is a resource i feel would be relevant to those students who struggle to be egaged in their reading

This can be used on readers on many different level

the reading maps foccus on language arts, Its description is communicated through charts, graphs, and maps intead of normal paragraphs and text

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 11:19 AM
I feel the skill of reading a map is very important, but it becoming less prevalent in classrooms. Teachers may find it more difficult to teach and therefore are not going in depth with it. I remember as a child in grade school we would color maps or have to find where the states are. We never were taught how to fully understand the uses of a map and all the different ways they are used and how to read them. It is becoming a lost skill in a world that needs to be more appreciative of geography.
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Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D

Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New geologic map helps scientists understand ancient volcano’s roots and contemporary rock falls.
Seth Dixon's insight:

On a personal note, my very first globe and National Geographic magazines were given to me by my grandparents who noticed I had an affinity for all things geographic.  They lived just outside Yosemite Park and they made sure I explored it frequently while I was growing up so I have a soft spot for this particular national park.  My grandmother informed me that El Capitan was the largest single piece of granite on Earth and my skeptical 3rd grade mind replied, "Is that a fact or an opinion?"  Informal geographic education had a greater impact on my educational path than the formal K-12 curriculum.  Without those simple nudges, I doubt I would be a geographer today.  


Tags: Californiaphysical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Geography of Thanksgiving

Geography of Thanksgiving | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I am very pleased to be blogging for National Geographic Education.  Here is the link to my first post on the geography of Thanksgiving. 

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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:34 PM

Dr. Seth Dixon also has geographyeducation.org, one of the finest sites of its kind...

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."


Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.

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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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Revolutionary War Battles

Revolutionary War Battles | Geography Education | Scoop.it
America's war for indpendence began on April 19, 1775, when the first shots were fired at Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts.


Tags: USA, historicalmapping, National Geographic.

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Feeding 9 Billion

Feeding 9 Billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.    


Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture

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Sally Egan's curator insight, April 30, 2014 11:09 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.   

 

This article relates well to the Population topic in Global Challenges and issues that arise from the present growth patterns.  

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:59 PM

As population continues to grow and agricultural lands dissappear, the issue of feeding the world is becoming a growing concern.

The environmental places of the world are becoming arid and the agrarian places are dwindling affecting the human/environment interaction by introducing agricultural issues.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:52 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.    

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture. 

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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a beauty and magnificent in nature, both is the microscopic and delicate as well as the grand and powerful.  The biosphere's diversity is a great part of it's allure that keeps geographers exploring for to understand the mysteries on our planet.  The incredible image at the end of this project really is truly stunning.  


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, California.

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Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 17, 2014 2:55 AM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 2014 4:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

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Geo-Educator Community

"Join Us at http://Geo-Education.org"

The Geo-Educator Community will bring together educators and thought-leaders from different disciplines, age groups, and educational settings, who share a commitment to preparing young people to be successful and responsible citizens of an interconnected world.
If you are passionate about helping your students understand our interconnected world, then you are a geo-educator. National Geographic is currently working alongside other geo-educators to create the Geo-Educator Community.

Join the conversation online: The Geo-Educator Community currently lives on Edmodo. Edmodo is a free and secure educator website which hosts over 28 million teachers and students worldwide.


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Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If all the ice in the world melted, we wouldn't have a post-apocalytic scenario like Kevin Costner's "waterworld," but  it still would have an enormous global impact.  This interactive feature highlights the locations of places that would be submerged in the most extreme example of hypothetical sea level changes.  What would some of these changes be?  

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Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:15 PM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This magazine feature is filled with resources for teaching urban geography and development.  In this feature you'll find 8 videos, articles, maps and images discuss some of the geographic factors that have created megacities and the difficulties that they pose for future development.


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities, National Geographic.

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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:38 PM

I thought this article was good as it gave information on how the world as we know it is growing and cities are popping up everywhere. Developing countries are seeing a large increase in growth and with that comes the growth of cities. With this, more megacities will be born and hopefully the quality of life increases with life in cities.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:09 AM

mega cities

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MOOC on Water

"Water is an essential theme in social studies, science, and geography. Whether teaching about natural or human systems, water is part of the story. This course, framed around California's Education and the Environment Initiative (EEI), focuses on ocean and freshwater topics and strategies for teaching environmental topics in Grades 4-8. Resources and support are provided for how to use EEI to implement Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This new MOOC on water resources in California is project supported by National Geographic Education and Annenberg Learner.  This is a course is designed to span the disciplines and create an awareness in students about environmental issues that impact them. 


Tags: consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment depend.

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Top Free Classes's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:45 AM

Starts in October.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:53 PM

I find this video very informative because I didn’t know, that they have this type of course. I feel this course should be teach in every classroom around the United States, because is not only the adult that needs to learn how to protect the environment. We also need to educate our children because they are the future of America.  I think that by taking this class people will learn which places have the more environmental problem, and by becoming more aware of the issue , we all together will find the solution.

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Hijab: Veiled in Controversy

Hijab: Veiled in Controversy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hijab is an Islamic concept of modesty and privacy, most notably expressed in women’s clothing that covers most of the body.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is the geography of hijab?  Covering one's head pre-dates Islam in the Middle East but many associate this practice strictly with Islam and only for women--read this article (with teaching tips and supplemental resources) for more context on this cultural and religious practice.  


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, National Geographic.

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Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:27 AM

 understanding difference

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 2:39 PM
The hijab has become a very controversial issue on the global scale. For example, Saudi Arabian and Iran women are required to wear it where as other countries (most recently France) have banned the wearing of such religious garments. Under the U.S. constitutions first amendment of freedom of speech and freedom of religion allows the women to wear them. For many women it is a choice of modesty or a way to show her devotion to her religion. Many people today still are uneducated about the topic and see it as a way these women are being oppressed. Ultimately it is that woman's choice, but it is a shame that in some places it may come with a price.
Mary Rack's comment, September 19, 2013 3:20 PM
Thank you, Shelby!!
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Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool

Maps as a Common Core Reading Tool | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"Did you know know that there are some excellent reading opportunities in Story Maps? This map serves as a table of contents for using Story Maps with Common Core Reading Standards.  Reinventing the wheel isn't necessary with so many great maps and data sources that will help us teaching reading, writing and thinking with engaging content and little effort."
Seth Dixon's insight:

The recently revised Geography for Life standards have been aligned to show how geographic skills can be taught within the Common Core framework.  The National Geographic Society, in cooperation with the National Council for Geographic Education and the Network of Alliances for Geographic Education created Connections to be that link (for grade specific Common Core/Geography resources click here). 


So how is this to be done? This storymap shows ten great examples of maps that can be used as reading documents, one for each of the 10 ELA Reading Standards. 


TagsmappingEnglish, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:40 PM

Common core ideas

 

Duke No Limit's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:53 PM

wow very interesting

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 13, 2013 5:39 PM

Very important way of communication!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As displayed in this fabulous video, NOAA has produced in-depth information about the Earth's dynamic vegetation layers.  This is a great example of how remote sensing data can enhance our understanding of the planet; additionally it is packaged in a very user-friendly format for a wide ranges of audiences.  For great static images of this data layer, National Geographic has produced this great gallery


Tags: physical, remote sensing, geospatial, biogeography.

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.