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What is halal meat?

What is halal meat? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There have been calls for clearer labelling of halal products in shops, restaurants and takeaways. But what is halal food? And why are campaigners so concerned?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

I know just enough Arabic to read the word Halal (حلال) and know that it means permissible, the opposite of Haram (حَرَام‎) which means forbidden or illegal.  In the context of meat, it means meat that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people).  Today, Halal is becoming an important issue within the European Union for two main reasons: 1) more Muslims are migrating to Europe and 2) Europeans are searching for less artificial food products.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe.  If you want to see the inner workings of a Halal slaughterhouse in New York, this video will show you what it is like.   

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 17, 2014 7:14 AM

Halal means permissible, the opposite of Haram  which means forbidden or illegal. 


Halal meat means that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people). 


Within the European Union more Muslims are migrating to Europe.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe. - From Seth Dixon

Kendra King's curator insight, February 27, 2015 12:07 AM

 

I am not surprised some European governments aren’t taking a stronger stance, but I think the market might sort itself out in this instance. This issue is another battle of a minority group trying to keep their culture in a different country. Muslims, who are typically discriminated against in Europe, would like there to be more clear labeling, along with Jews (another minority). As mentioned in the article, most countries (excluding Denmark) allow suppliers to kill without stunning for religious purposes, but  buyers are having trouble identifying the meat they can eat provided by these suppliers since most Europeans don't need to know this information. The author pointed out that the economic trend is showing that Muslims have enough of a "spending power" that the slaughterhouses will want to respond to their needs in order to profit. It would be nice for the government to step in, but I really doubt that will happen given how this group is typically marginalized. So in this instance, the Muslims are lucky that money motivates.  

 

Overall, I sympathize with the Muslim's desire to want more labeling even though I don't agree with it. The reason I am against eating meat rests largely with how the animals are treated from their time on the farm being raised to the time they are slaughtered. I myself wish their was more information in regards to this so I could eat meat in good conscious. Killing without stunning isn’t the most humane, but that is what  these people's conscience need due to their religion. So denying or harshly judging this desire would just be plain hypocritical of me. Therefore, I hope the economy can actually take care of itself.  

 

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World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think

World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are about 1.6 billion Muslims, or 23% of the world's population, making Islam the second-largest religion.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you think that most of the world's Muslim population lived in the Middle East and North Africa?  If so you are not alone, but the Middle East and North Africa account for only 19.8% of the global Muslim population.  In fact there are more Muslims in India and Pakistan than the Middle East and North Africa.   


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, Middle East.

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Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 3:55 PM

Showing the distribution of Islam around the world. Outside of the middle east, Indonesia has the most Muslims. This religion is one of the fastest growing in the world. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:46 PM

This article was good to look at because the majority of people assume Muslims are only in the Middle East. There are 1.6 billion Muslims around the world. Two-thirds of the Muslim population live in the Asia-Pacific region than in the middle east. More Muslims actually live in India and Pakistan. Muslims make up the majority of the population in 49 countries around the world. Islam has become the world's second largest religious tradition after Christianity. I would love to know some reasons behind why certain Muslims live in other areas. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:33 PM

This interesting map/infographic shows where Muslims are concentrated around the world. What I found most interesting and a little bit counterintuitive was that the highest number of Muslims is found in the Asia- Pacific region rather than in Northern Africa or the Middle East. When you consider how large Indonesia's population is, however, and the fact that more than three-quarters of it identify as Muslim, it makes a bit more sense. What is really staggering is the fact that there are an estimated 1.6 billion Muslims around the world, making nearly a quarter of the global population Muslim. 

 

What this map shows is the ability of religion to transcend political, economic, and cultural borders. Though Islam is a religion with its origins in the Middle East, it has grown and spread across the world to now have adherents on every continent. Of course, Islam is not the only major religion to have accomplished this feat, but it is particularly important to keep in mind considering the fear and criticism with which Islam has been met in recent years. People tend to think of Muslims as uniformly extremist advocates of violence who wage holy wars no matter the cost. This is, of course, untrue and characterizes the kind of dangerous stereotyping that occurs in regards to many different religions. While this map seeks to show numbers and percentages, it also shows that there are many, many more Muslims in the world than the extremists highlighted in the news and that Islam is not defined by these radicals. 

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Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great photo gallery, but I wanted to make a special note of this image.  The caption for this picture says, "Egyptians watch as Muslims march on the street to mark the birthday of the Prophet Muhammed in Cairo, Jan 13, 2014."  Is this a representative group of Egyptians?  What demographic group would we expect to see in the second story balcony?  What does the architecture tell us about the cultural norms of the society?

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 2:50 PM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:53 PM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2014 1:52 PM

Women and Men in some Islamic countries live entirely different lives in regards to their geographic spheres. The women dominate the private sphere, they are sheltered from the public sphere. Their architecture reflects that fact. Windows and balconies are constructed so people can see out but not see in from the street. Homes are built so the houses across from one another are not lined up with the front doors directly across from one another. Streets are winding and made so the homes are extremely private. This reflects society in regards to how people view gender. Females are kept out of the public sphere and when they do venture out into the streets, they are encouraged to have a male escorting them. This image above shows the balcony as a barrier keeping females "protected" from the public sphere.

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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 2010 New York Times video shows in a poignant way how the past and the present, the global and the local comibine to create underground cultural practices among the wealthy in Pakistan. 


Tags: Pakistan, popular culture, SouthAsiaglobalization, culture, Islam.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:48 PM

Alcohol bootleggers have been getting shutdown by the police force. Without this service, the bootleggers would be out of business and probably in jail. This is like prohibition in the U.S. and those who sold alcohol were fined and also arrested. The same thing is happening here where the bootleggers are trying to make huge money by selling something thats outlawed.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:36 PM

Interesting to see this happening in other areas of the world besides the United States during the times of prohibition.  If there is a will there is a way.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:57 AM

this makes sense. even in regions controlled by Muslim extremest people are people and they want their booze. this is a perfect example of the reason why you cannot punish all people of a certain group for the actions of a few.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).

Seth Dixon's insight:

Religious traditions are interconnected and often share common roots and ancestries.  This stunning infographic is an attempt to visually reconcile these disparate strands of faith into one cohesive whole (the image above is far too small to do it justice, but I tried to show the image at various scales).


Tags: perspectiveculture, religion, culture, infographic, diffusion.

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Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 2015 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:16 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and perspectives

Although the article relating to this diagram is in Russian, the diagram is not, and I found it to be a very interesting visual to not only show world religions developing on a time scale, but also because it does a very good job of showing just how many little divisions of each religion they are, and how they are all intertwined. Zooming in on the diagram, you are able to see each divide, each new branch, and each date for hundreds of sets of information.

 

This illustrates the theme of identification of major world religions because it simply shows the mass amounts of tiny divisions that occur in the major world religions in a simple format. This is very helpful because this would be pages of writing if you tried to write it all out. 

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Using Humor to Learn

Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani takes to the TEDxSummit stage in Doha, Qatar to take on serious issues in the Middle East -- like how many kisses to give when saying “Hi,” and what not to say on an American airplane.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This comedian doesn't just get laughs; he uses stand-up as a platform for discussing important social issues and to foster greater cultural understanding.  His big goal is to break stereotypical perspectives of Muslims and show that "there are good people everywhere."  Here is another of his entertaining and educational TED talks.  


Tags: Middle East, TEDglobalization, culture, Islam.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:56 PM

This video was great to watch. I watched this in class and had to write about it. Humor is a great way to shed light on certain topics that can be really heavy. This comedian is middle eastern himself which makes it better for him to talk about these topics. Many individuals don't know the lighter side to middle eastern people just because all they see is negative aspects of the culture. I enjoyed that he could talk about serious topics and have a room full of people not only laughing at it but being educated at the same time. People don't feel like they're being strictly taught because they're watching a comedian give a show. Being middle eastern myself, i found this video great because raising awareness and allowing more insight about the middle east is a powerful thing when it has always has a negative context. 

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:42 PM

"I never knew these people laughed." This is perhaps one of the most sad things that could be said. It dehumanizes the middle east in a very cruel way. It implies that people in the middle east do not have any sense of humor and are always serious about everything. Like the United States, there are times to be serious, but there are also times to laugh. The media and even the film industry in the US portrays the middle east as Sodom and Gomorra and the people from the area as misogynistic religious fanatics. It is truly sad that we live in a world where prejudices trump openness and acceptance.      

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:17 PM

its interesting because this video make the middle east seem more european with the differences in culture. people tend to clump these countries together but they are very different and should be seen that way

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The Struggle for Jihad

The Struggle for Jihad | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two opposing groups battle to define the word jihad on public buses and subways.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This New York Times video highlights two current media campaigns that are in their own struggle to shape the meaning(s) of the word jihad for the American public.  While the definition of "Holy War" is often quoted, it also means a struggle.  When you hear the word jihad, who's jihad do you think of first?  The cultural context within which a word is used might not be the same context in which the message is received and interpreted.  This disconnect can be a part of cultural conflicts and misunderstandings.   

 

Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, USA.

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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 30, 2013 8:07 AM
It is sad that these people are feeling the negative connotations of people who commit crimes under their own definition of the word jihad. When in actuality the word means to Islamic followers a personal struggle.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:27 AM
Islamic cultural has been isolated and generalized in American society after September 11th, 2001. Because of this, the Islamic religion is often misunderstood or misrepresented. There are extremist factions of every religion, even Christian, though sometimes our culture forgets that. This video is about a Muslim organization that is trying to take back the definition of “jihad” in American society. Since 9/11, the world has been synonymous with violence, though many Muslims do not believe their struggle for a better life with God is a violent struggle.
Cultures are multilayer. While some Muslim’s believe jihad is a holy war, others see it as a personal struggle. American culture has a lot to learn about the Muslim cultures through out the world, including the differences between the extremist and non-extremist factions. Extremist factions tend to get the most press coverage and attention from outsiders because they are by name extreme. It would be interesting to see how this relationship with jihad would differ if September 11th never happened.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:31 PM
Before seeing this video I had always thought of a Jihad as a religious war started by radical Muslims. After watching I felt bad personally that I had confused this word with something that many people hold as just a goal or a personal struggle for them. I do not know if it is because post-9/11 there was much anti-Islam and anti-muslim sentiment in the US (still are today) and that the word became a radical term in the United States, I don’t know. I agree with Conor and saying that the reason many people know Jihad as a religious war is because of the media attention that radical Islamists receive when they bomb/hurt/kill and that is hurting the image of Muslims and Jihad in America.
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The Great Mosque of Djenné

The Great Mosque of Djenné | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Great Mosque of Djenné, Mali, is a magnet for tourists, but it is increasingly difficult for locals to live a normal life around it.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This New York Times short video is an intriguing glimpse into some of the cultural pressures behind having the designation of being an official world heritage site.  The grerat mosque combined with the traditional mud-brick feel to the whole city draws in tourists and is a source of communal pride, but many homeowners want to modernize and feel locked into traditional architecture by outside organizations that want them to preserve an 'authentic' cultural legacy.


Tags: Islam, tourism, place, religion, culture, historical, community, Mali, Africa.

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?


The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.

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Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 2014 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

Kendra King's curator insight, March 28, 2015 8:45 PM

It would make sense for the immediate well-being of the girls for the family to just leave Pakistan. As the article mentioned, the economy is horrible for graduates (especially women) and the country lives in a dangerous military state. Yet, the family (excluding the father) continues to stay in Pakistan. I wonder, since their father is a doctor and can afford private schooling, if they stay because of the wealth advantage. As the author alluded to, girls can be more than teachers if they have the resources like Prime Minster Buhtto did. Still though, with the danger so high and better jobs available I really think there is more to the story. The explanation that makes most sense to me came from Mahrukh’s statement regarding Prime Minster Buhtto when she said, “Everyone has to go from this world, why not be famous? Why not make a name and leave your name on people’s lips.” This quote shows just how dedicated Mahrukh is to her country. It is so high that she is willing to die doing something important (provided it makes her famous).  In some ways, I find that misguided. I think the attention girls like her and Malala can bring to people who are donating to the politically broken school is of immense value. This attention wakes more people up to the issues of Pakistan and the issues of the Taliban to one day put more pressure on the nation. Yet, I know Malala doesn’t want to continue to raise awareness among the Western world her whole life. Her autobiography ends with her dreaming of returning to Pakistan. Like Mahrukh, she will die for her country too (308-311). A part deep down can see though, that for a revolution to happen the girls need to actually stay within the country. For one, the west can only interfere with the politics of another country for so long. Furthermore, I am still a legitimate believe in sovereignty despite the increasing globalization. By this I mean that it is the countries issue and it is through the pressure and convictions of the people against the government and the Taliban that will have the most impact. I hope that by staying these girls will one day have an immense impact on the social culture in Pakistan. 

 

*Yousafzai, Malala, and Christina Lamb. I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban. First ed. New York: Little, Brown, 2013. 308-311. Print.
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An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World'

An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World' | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The violent backlash against the American film is taking place in Muslim societies, but it doesn't seem to correlate with Islam's reach.


This is a good reminder that the generalizing about "all Muslims" is as inaccurate as generalization about "all Christians" or any other group.  The world and people are much more nuanced than that. 


Tags: MiddleEast, Islam, conflict.

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Martin Daumiller's comment, September 16, 2012 2:53 AM
The map is slightly poor. 100% and more world muslim population? There is a great mix-up between muslims living in a country and percentage of muslims living in a country, therefore turning the U.S., Russia, etc. also into the discussion.
Also there is a distinction between not-protesting and not supporting the protests, which should influence the authers comparision of different mentalities.
The main idea against stereotypes and generalization is a very worthy one, but the way is article shows it is flawed.
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Ramadan 2012 begins

Ramadan 2012 begins | Geography Education | Scoop.it
All over the world Muslims have begun their holiest month of the year by fasting from dawn until dusk each day, broken each evening by large, communal meals.

 

This photoessay is a visual and cultural delight.  Pictured above is a Pakistani boy who prays next to plates of fruits donated to worshippers to break their fast (Karachi, July 21, 2012).  On the first day of the holy fasting month of Ramadan, we see the communal ethos of Ramadan.

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Valentia Pollard's comment, September 4, 2012 7:15 PM
The fact that over 1 billion Muslims take part in Ramadan is incredible. My dad is apart of Ramadan and was telling me all about it. Its amazing how dedicated they are to their religion.
David Sanchez's comment, September 5, 2012 8:08 PM
It's amazing that so many people can be so dedicated to their religion, even if it means fasting for such a long period of time.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:32 PM

Ramadan is such a sacred holy month for Muslims. It is a crucial time for holiness and togetherness. Muslims fast, pray, and eat at evening breaking the fasts. It is a celebration that is taken very seriously, but can still incorporate in some fun with fireworks.

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Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study

Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a nation of 230 million people, 700 languages and some 300 ethnicities, ethnic Chinese are one of Indonesia’s historic minorities.

 

Religion and ethnicity are often connected, but not always.  This case study of such a group, the Chinese Muslims of Indonesia, provide an interesting glimpse into the economic, historic and political patterns of these cultural groups that are parts of communal identities.  

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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:40 AM

Pie charts to display ethnicity, religion, and population across the world,

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:26 PM

This is a very unusual circumstance.  The Chinese were originally immigrants to Indonesia.  Then they were regarded as higher on the social status than native Indonesians under Dutch rule.  And eventually when Indonesia got its independence, assimilation was forced on the Chinese.  This is a clear case of racism and religion-forcing at its finest.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 7:17 AM

Indonesia is often identified as the largest Muslim nation in the world. That identification, is only telling a portion of the true Indonesian story. Indonesia is one of the most diverse nations on the planet. The nation has over 700 languages, and has some 300 different ethnicities. Among those may ethnicities, are ethnic Chinese Muslims. Each ethnicity possesses its own cultural identity. In the years following the Second World War, a vast program of persecution was directed at the ethnic Chinese. Many felt, that it was impossible for ethnic Chinese and Indonesians to coexist. After a long struggle, by 2000 ethnic Chinese rights were reinstated.  

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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Diana Markosian spent the last year and half covering Russia's volatile North Caucasus region.

 

These 33 photos are arranged to tell the cultural story of life in Chechnya, especially the life of young women coming of age in the aftermath of the war.  As the architecture of this mosque suggests, the influence of traditional Islamic values and Russian political authority have greatly shaped the lives of the Chechen people.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:28 PM

These photos show the culture of Chechnya. I found them very effective at mixing the environmental and cultural aspects of the area in these pictures. The one where two young people are on a date in a barren snow covered park sitting on opposites sides of the bench because close physical contact is forbidden before marriage. Although the school gym shows how women have to be dressed modestly even when they are exercising. 

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 10, 2015 7:33 PM

A picture says a thousand words.  I saw and learned more through these photos than I could of in any article, because you can really see what it's like there.  Authors and journalists can write and write about the facts and the people and the places, but they'll never really be able to show you, not the way pictures like these can.  The pictures of all these people show you what it's like to be there, how they live, what they do, their culture, beliefs, and ways of life. It's one thing to read about how strict rules for women are, but it's another to see those rules in action, like in gym class, and on dates.  We hear these ideas about countries who are strict with women, but can't really see what it would be like because we don't have that in the U.S., but these pictures make you feel it, not just think it.

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For the Muslims of CAR, it's 'leave or die'

For the Muslims of CAR, it's 'leave or die' | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thousands of Muslims in the Central African Republic have fled as UN chief warns of 'ethno-religious cleansing'.


Leave or die.  It's come down to this for the Muslims of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic.  Muslims here once lived freely among the Christian majority, running businesses and praying in mosques. Now, many of the city's Muslims have fled, and on Sunday about 1,300 Muslims from Bangui's PK12 neighbourhood were evacuated to safety by peacekeeping forces.

Already one of the world's poorest countries, CAR has seen a wave of upheaval and violence in the past 15 months. The 10-month reign of the Muslim-dominated Seleka rebel group inflamed intercommunal tensions in the country, and spurred the rise of Christian militias called the anti-Balaka.  Once the Seleka was forced out of power in January, the anti-Balaka rampaged, targeting Muslims across the country for their perceived support of the Seleka and its bloody excesses.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Also this interactive feature is worth your time...it won't make you feel all sunshine and rainbows, but the hard truth rarely does. 

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David Lizotte's curator insight, April 5, 2015 11:24 AM

This article does a good job discussing the ongoing issues in the Central African Republic. Its horrible to see a religious cleansing taking place at this point in time. One would think religious cleansing by the sword has diminished (perhaps it has in historical terms) but it is still very much alive throughout the world. What's interesting is how once religion is mixed with politics it seems bloodshed always ensues. The changing of presidents reflects the changing of "what group" controls the country/region... 

CAR is located within the struggling Sahel region. Yes, there are ecological/environmental issues that plague the Sahel region and the people whom inhabit it but the region also proposes an intense societal issue. This is the region where Arab Africa meets Black Africa, thus two distinct groups of people with two different faiths. Due to conflicts in neighboring countries, as exemplified in the article through Chad, disruption has led to Arab peoples fleeing South. The displacement of these people has led to a growing muslim population in Christian dominated Central African Republic. Once political order is involved there is always one group of people in charge. The changing of societal leaders has now led to a 15 month disruption which has now evolved into a religious ethnic cleansing. 

The Sahel region is only going to get worse. There is an issue with the climate which is affecting both the people and landscape. There is now a clash of cultures/religions. These two issues are ultimately going to clash. Not only will Christians and Arabs kill each other due to political structure and treatment of each others people but perhaps disputes over fertile land, clean water, droughts, etc... will also lead to conflict. This region of the world is in a tough predicament. The clashing of peoples is not going to improve the situation. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:36 PM

The picture is ironic because the one guy in the white tank top is holding up a peace sign and the other is threatening to slit your throat.  Oxymoronic?  I guess you could see it as a V for victory.  Not really sure.  This comes down to an eye for an eye.  The Christians and Muslims will kill each other till one group comes out on top.  I guess historically we learned nothing from the Reformation.  At one point you couldn't be Protestant, then you couldn't be Catholic.  Religious persecution should not be occurring today.  What a waste of human life.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:14 PM

Though the Central African Republic is a country that not many people have heard of, it seems that it suffers from some of the same problems that any other country does. CAR is home to a large Christian population, though there is a Muslim minority present within the country. The past two years have seen a Muslim rebel group called Seleka perpetrate a violent reign throughout the country, which in turn has given rise to opposition Christian groups called the anti-Balaka. After the Seleka were toppled from power, the anti-Balaka took out their fear and frustration on the country's Muslim population for perceived support of the Seleka. The anti-Balaka murdered Muslims brutally and indiscriminately, causing many Muslims in CAR to either flee or come together in enclaves for protection and support. 

 

This kind of religious persecution is unfortunately nothing new. The Jews have experienced religious persecution for thousands of years and Muslims were on the receiving end of some particularly brutal persecution during the Crusades. It seems that regardless of the time or place, religious tensions are always present and one religion or another is always ready to persecute the other for their differences, real or perceived. This is a global pattern, not unique to any one country, region, or culture. It is an unfortunate but telling one, as it highlights the tendency of human beings to be at odds with one another over any differences. The situation in CAR is representative of a larger problem of intolerance that may never seen an end. 

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Muslim Woman Discovers Friendly New World When a Winter Scarf Covers Her Hijab

Muslim Woman Discovers Friendly New World When a Winter Scarf Covers Her Hijab | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Chicago's bitter cold temps led to an impromptu social experiment when Leena Suleiman bundled up in a knit scarf and cap.
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Scott Langston's curator insight, February 19, 2014 6:55 PM

Knowledge Questions: Under what circumstances is it acceptable to deliberately deceive others? To what extent are stereotypes justifiable? Is cultural integration ever possible?

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 2014 3:25 PM

Interesting article about a social experiment...

Joy Kinley's curator insight, February 26, 2014 1:11 PM

One slight difference in dress - hijab or cap - and a world of difference in how she is treated.  What makes us "be" part of a group?  A hijab clearly marks a woman is Muslim and for some people that is scary, while others welcome you.

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Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Gapminder is a tremendous resource that I've shared in the past and total fertility rates is an ideal metric to see in this data visualization tool.  As Hans Rosling said in one of his TED talks using Gapminder, religion and total fertility rates are not as connected as previously thought.  In this particular mode, you can see how three predominantly Catholic countries (Philippines, Argentina and Mexico) compare in Total Fertility Rates to three predominantly Muslim countries (Indonesia, Turkey and Iran).  


Questions to Ponder: Historically many have assumed that Catholic and Muslim populations would have higher birth rates; why is this changing?  How important a factor is religion in changing fertility rates?  What are other factors impact a society's fertility rate?


Tags: population, demographicsvisualization, religion.

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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 3:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 5:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.

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Hijab: Veiled in Controversy

Hijab: Veiled in Controversy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hijab is an Islamic concept of modesty and privacy, most notably expressed in women’s clothing that covers most of the body.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is the geography of hijab?  Covering one's head pre-dates Islam in the Middle East but many associate this practice strictly with Islam and only for women--read this article (with teaching tips and supplemental resources) for more context on this cultural and religious practice.  


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, National Geographic.

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Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:27 AM

 understanding difference

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 2:39 PM
The hijab has become a very controversial issue on the global scale. For example, Saudi Arabian and Iran women are required to wear it where as other countries (most recently France) have banned the wearing of such religious garments. Under the U.S. constitutions first amendment of freedom of speech and freedom of religion allows the women to wear them. For many women it is a choice of modesty or a way to show her devotion to her religion. Many people today still are uneducated about the topic and see it as a way these women are being oppressed. Ultimately it is that woman's choice, but it is a shame that in some places it may come with a price.
Mary Rack's comment, September 19, 2013 3:20 PM
Thank you, Shelby!!
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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I first learned of the Pakistan's new animated TV series the Burka Avenger last week from an NPR podcast and eagerly wanted to know more.  Some are hailing the Burka Avenger to be Pakistan's answer to Wonder Woman, fighting for the rights of the oppressed.  There has also been a lot of criticism concerning the role of the burka juxtaposed with this heroine.  For many, they see the burka solely as a symbol of female oppression and feel that a heroine shouldn't be donning the clothing of the oppressed (my opinion?--C'mon, it's the logical masked outfit for a female superhero trying to be incognito in the tribal villages of Pakistan).  I find this pairing of traditional gender norms and clothing coupled with pop culture's superhero motifs to be a fantastic demonstration of how cultures mesh together.  Globalization doesn't mean all cultures are the same; we often see highly localized and distinct regional twists on global themes.


Tags: Pakistangender, popular culture, SouthAsiaglobalization, culture, Islam.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 2015 4:25 PM

A modern day Batman/Superman, Burka Avenger, with great graphics and an in-depth plot. The television shows the Pakistanis children watch are the same type of shows that I watched growing up, and the shows that the modern day children of today’s youth are watching. The cross-cultural relationship seems so different, but at the roots it is the same. The kids in this show have friends, pets, enemies, a hero, a conflict; everything that an American television show would feature.  Whether the kids are facing a bully, a school closure from a villain, or a life peril from another villain, there undercover school teacher is there ready and willing to save the day. Everybody needs a hero to look up to, so this show is great for the Pakistani youth. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:06 AM

I think this is wonderful.  It also reemphasizes the reality that all children are born without preconceived notions of what is right, what is wrong, what is good, or what is evil.  An American child might look at this and automatically think that the lady in the Burka is a "villain", due to American media and propaganda.  I can't help but think of the backlash that would surround this cartoon if they ever tried to put it on American airwaves.  

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This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now

This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When Anum Hussain heard about the Boston Marathon bombing, she immediately panicked, worried that the culprits would be like her. The 22-year-old Muslim was in the offices of Hubspot, the Cambridge marketing-software company she works for.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting article; place and context mediate cultural interactions.  I can only imagine how incredibly difficult it would be to be a Muslim in the Boston area right now.  This geographer wishes that everyone could feel safe everywhere.    


Tags: terrorism, religion, Boston, Islam.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:33 PM

Being from around the area and listening and watching the tv during the boston bombings all I really thought about was how the city and families were effected by the tragic event. However I never really thought about how it impacted muslim people in the area. For people to put a blame on all muslim people is not right. We are not all the same, which means not all muslims are the same. Some muslims have lived their whole lives in the US and for people to catogorize them all as terrorists isn't right. All people should be treated them same way. It is sad to read the article and think that some muslims in Boston walk around in fear of being beat up or killed just because of their culture. The bombings effected an entire city and muslim people people should be able to mourn with the rest of the city. They grew up there just like we did. So what makes them so different from me and you? Not all muslims are killers like the two boys from the bombings. It is really sad to me that they have to live their lives in fear everyday in a place that they call home, just because of their culture. No one deserves to live like that. I can't even imagine how difficult it is for muslim people in Boston. 

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:38 AM

Terrorism is a huge problem in our Country today. I'm not trying to racist saying this but I feel like they do it to themselves. Coming into our country and terrorizing our nation thats okay? Yes not every Muslim is a terrorist im not saying that but you never know if they are or not. Since 911 we cant trust anyone, and theres a reason for that. I understand that they should not have to feel any different then the average American but the past is what we all dwell on.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:19 AM

Some are saying that racism doesnt exist anymore but it does. Muslims still live in fear that they are being judged everyday because some Americans generalize Muslims with terrorism

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Pop culture in the Arab world

TED Talks At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED talk cleverly discusses the cultural processes of globalization by examining two examples from the Islamic world.  The examples of the TV station 4Shbab and the comic book series The 99 show that all global cultural interactions don’t have to result in a homogenous “melting pot.”  Local cultural forces can tap into the powers of globalized culture that can create dynamic local cultures that are both intensely local and global. 


Questions to Ponder: What does the speaker mean when she by refers to cultural interactions as a mesh (as a opposed to a clash or mash) of civilizations?  What other examples of cultural meshes can you see that show these processes? 


Tags: TED, religion, culture, Islam, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:23 AM

I don't think popular culture and folk culture interact very well. They believe in completely different things and live different types of lives according to their values. The speaker means that the cultural interaction is intertwined together because of the islamic people who have borrowed cultural ideas from other ancient and modern civilizations and adapted it to their own. That's why it's meshed as a opposed to clashing or mash. For example, the music video channel that's like MTV. I think it's kind of funny how they made the people in that music video, that's from the USA, look like we also worship Allah. Also, the comic books show religious values in it, especially since the characters come from it. They want young people to not get sucked in to the outside world or modern culture from different societies, so instead they want to incorporate their religion with our ideas of culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:22 PM

unit 3

Jamey Kahl's curator insight, March 27, 11:09 PM

This TED talk cleverly discusses the cultural processes of globalization by examining two examples from the Islamic world.  The examples of the TV station 4Shbab and the comic book series The 99 show that all global cultural interactions don’t have to result in a homogenous “melting pot.”  Local cultural forces can tap into the powers of globalized culture that can create dynamic local cultures that are both intensely local and global. 


Questions to Ponder: What does the speaker mean when she by refers to cultural interactions as a mesh (as a opposed to a clash or mash) of civilizations?  What other examples of cultural meshes can you see that show these processes? 


Tags: TED, religion, culture, Islam, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

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The Next Step in the Islamic Wave

The Next Step in the Islamic Wave | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Muslim Brotherhood has been gaining power in several countries since the Arab Spring. The rise of Islamist power in the Middle East is culturally and politically complex.  This interactive lets the user click on selected countries to see how groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood or Hamas are impacting them politically. 


Tags: Middle East, religion, Islam, political.

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Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 4, 2014 3:03 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
www.qurancoaching.com

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 12, 2014 2:13 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 27, 2014 1:34 PM
The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes. http://goo.gl/st4aLZ Like/Share/Comment. #quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed
Suggested by Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Attacks on Mosques in U.S. on the Rise

Attacks on Mosques in U.S. on the Rise | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Acts of violence against Muslim Americans and their houses of worship have increased, especially in the weeks since Ramadan began this year.


Tags: religion, Islam, culture, conflict, terrorism, unit 3 culture.

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Anger Over Film Fuels Anti-American Attacks in Libya and Egypt

Anger Over Film Fuels Anti-American Attacks in Libya and Egypt | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Protesters upset over an American-made video denouncing Islam attacked the United States Consulate in Libya, while Egyptian demonstrators stormed over the walls of the United States Embassy in Cairo.


The idea of anti-U.S. protests in the Middle East and Northa Africa on the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 was initially quite shocking. As always, a greater understanding of the cultural context and timing helps explain (not necessarily justify) the situation. The video produced by "Sam Bacile" that has sparked the controversy is truly reprehensible and as cultural insensitive as it gets. Still, the protests, by blindly lashing out at the United States embassy, only exacerbate the cultural problems. 

UPDATE: This public gathering of Libyan's in Benghazi to apologize for the death of Chris Stevens is quite poignant.  


Questions to Ponder: How does one single YouTube video impact geopolitics?  Culturally speaking, what makes this such a powerfully charged issue?  Will this issue become fodder for the election? 


Tags: MiddleEast, political, culture, Islam, religion.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 17, 2013 5:03 PM

Protestors were upset over an American made video denouncing Islam and attacked the United States Consulate in Libya and demonstrators stromed over walls of the United States Embassy in Cario. The video was insensitive and sparked anger throughout many. With the way the internet reaches and how social media works many more people in far reach areas are able to view these videos and create problems like this.

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 31, 2013 10:31 AM

On the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11th in the United States, anti-U.S. protestors attacked Benghazi due to their anger toward an American-made YouTube video that denounced Islam.  It is amazing to see the impact that one single Internet creation can have.  It shows the power that particular media and social outlets such as YouTube and Facebook have.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 2:18 PM

I remember reading about this, and I had hoped at the time that tensions between the US and much of the Islamic world might have improved by now. However, that has sadly not been the case; violence in Iraq and Syria have continued to breed bad blood between the West and North Africa. The attack in Benghazi helped to give conservative groups the necessary ammunition to continue their attacks on Islam and certainly did not help public perception of the faith, breeding further hatred within our own country. Although many Libyans congregated to apologize for the violence, the region has not stabilized and anti-US sentiments are still rampant in pockets, much like they are throughout the region. The legacy of this attack has had serious ramifications for US-Muslim relations, and I can only hope that the situation does indeed change in the next 3 years, much like I had hoped they would within the previous 3.

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In Iran, They Want Fun, Fun, Fun

In Iran, They Want Fun, Fun, Fun | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Young Iranians are tuning out. Of those encountered on a visit, many seemed less interested in religious fanaticism than in sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll.

 

Often we fall into the trap of assuming that the political rhetoric of the governmental regime is is culturally representative of the people of that country (such as this picture above.  Listen to this podcast on the  Iranian nuclear program for an example of the religous/political rhetoric: http://www.scoop.it/t/regional-geography/p/2016189455/iran-s-nuclear-fatwa-a-policy-or-a-ploy ).  And yet, people are still people, and kids are just kids, even in a conservative theocratic government.

"One of the most pernicious misunderstandings in the West about Iranians is that they are dour religious fanatics...In the 1970s, disgruntled young Iranians rebelled against a corrupt secular regime by embracing an ascetic form of Islam. Now they’re rebelling against a corrupt religious regime by embracing personal freedom — in some cases, even sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll." 

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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:26 AM

The rebellious nature of young adults seems to be a unifying human factor regardless of the country or regime. They may not rebel in the same ways we'd expect, but they rebel regardless. The thing I especially find interesting across all countries is the upcoming of this new generation. The older people of all nations spend a lot of time holding onto their power and beliefs, but time will only tell how drastically the world will change once they naturally die out and this new generation, raised by video games and the unifying power of the internet, takes over.

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

 

One of the free response questions in the 2012 AP Human Geography test focused on increasing Muslim population in many European countries.  The Muslim community has (in the view of most Europeans polled) has not adequately assimilated into European society, and with many Europeans feeling a cultural threat, have created a politically charged situation.  Has Europe failed to integrate Muslims or have Muslims failed to integrate in Europe?  Is this a problem?  Why or why not?  To see the APHG test question, click here:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap_frq_human_geo_2012.pdf

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Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:58 PM

I feel that the rejection of any attempt to integrate Islam into European society is, at least in part, a reaction to the declining native population of most of the major Western European nations. They are attempting to keep anyone they cant assimilate out, while insuring that any Muslims that they can assimilate are dressing and acting close enough to the existing culture so as to blend into their native population.