Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Geography Poster

Geography Poster | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you remember the elements of geo-literacy as defined by National Geographic, all the themes are at the bottom of this chart...hmmmm.

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, November 9, 2013 7:17 AM

Poster sobre la enseñanza de la geografía

Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:14 PM

Really wished I had created this. Thanks Durman District school board and Charles E Gritzner. (Apologies is surname is incorrect - difficult to read on the poster.)

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:39 AM

can be used for the inquiry process

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Remembering Wilbur Zelinksy

Remembering Wilbur Zelinksy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Later this week, there will be a memorial service on the Penn State campus (Oct 26th-see details here)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This summer I unexpectedly found myself at the estate sale of the great cultural geographer, Wilbur Zelinsky.  I heard earlier through the Penn State geography department that he had passed away, but was startled to find myself discussing his legacy with his children.  This picture (that was being held up by the most amazing magnet ever) on his filing cabinet seems like a perfect tribute to his intellectual legacy.  Read the full article with additional pictures here.

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Gilbert C FAURE's comment, October 21, 2013 4:13 AM
this is a general fact: "This was when I realized that young academics always make a name for themselves by standing on the shoulders of giants; some choose then to look down on their predecessors while others acknowledge that their work is dependent on those who came before. " congratulations for this analysis of human beings attitudes...Scientists are human after all
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Just what is Geography?

Just what is Geography? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I'm a geographer. Yes, I study rocks, but I'm not a geologist. I consider weather and climate when I study people--but I know the environment doesn't determine a culture's development. Hydrology and oceanography are cool. Please don't feel threatened just because I know about economic, political, and cultural globalization. I read Darwin, Lovelock, Marx, and Tuan--all in geography classes. The newspaper calls me a local historian. My neighbors think I'm an expert on roads. I hang out in cemeteries. I've served in government--far more successfully than the self-proclaimed 'business experts.' Capitals? I really haven't memorized them, thank you. But I can think spatially and holistically. I love my planet. I'm interdisciplinary. I'm a geographer."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I you haven't 'liked' the Church of Geography on Facebook, you really should. These geo-sermons are worth the huge investment of a simple click.  

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nativemedia's comment, September 25, 2013 12:27 AM
excellent
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How Geography Explains the United States

How Geography Explains the United States | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Via Emma Lafleur
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to ponder: How much do you agree with the author's assertion that geography explains the foreign affairs of the U.S.?  Is there any environmental determinism in this argument?  

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Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, April 18, 2013 9:39 AM

There are so many facets to geography and the United States has certainly benefitted from all of them; from location to abundant natural resources to cultural histories. I think this is a good introduction to the topic.

Louis Culotta's comment, April 18, 2013 12:41 PM
I would think that the united states treats Canada a lot better at than in Mexico because of the border issues that exist because of people trying to smuggle drugs or people into America from Mexico continues to be abig problem with the US goverment.
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:48 PM

I think the very last paragraph of this article is one of the truest statements about America that I have ever read.  "There's so much good America can do in the world." This is absolutely true because as the author covered, the U.S. is very good at getting involved in foreign affairs and we are extremely lucky to have the borders that we do.  We're safe on this side of the globe, a world away from the places that have suffered religious and political turmoil for centuries.  

However, the citizens of the U.S. often remain marginally uneducated about out foreign affairs because of the portrayals by the media and the many covered up mistakes that the U.S. has made.  The author of this piece noted America's three major faults as pragmatism, idealism, arrogance and ambivalence.  The United States is ultimately the most conceited country in the world but it's not entirely the fault of its citizens.  U.S. media's job is not necessarily to report the truth but report the fractions of truth that will continue to inspire nationalism, even if that means leaving out the fact that many problems around the world have been increased due to America's participation.

The author of this piece pointed out America's habit of only joining in when it is beneficial for our country, even if it is not in the best interest of the people we are helping.  We offered assistance to the reformers in Egypt but ignored problems raging in Bahrain.  The U.S. has only limited understanding of many of the old, traditional cultures that reign in parts of the Middle East but that does not stop the country from trying to help and often, looking foolish or inciting more unrest.

We have grown to feel very safe in on our side of the planet and regardless of the few attacks that have penetrated America's defense, we still have a very limited world view because there are no threats from our neighbors and it is okay to be whomever you'd like to be (technically speaking because racism, sexism, and homophobia are still rampant in this country) without threats from people around you.  It would be in our country's best interest to educate ourselves on world events and other cultures to be well rounded and less offensive to those who suffer in other regions. The author called America's belief that the problems between Israeli's and Palestinians would resolve with a classic Hollywood happy ending a part of America's problem with idealism and not understanding what it is like to have neighbors who want to dive in during the midst of horrible wars and take whatever they can get their hands on.   Having the borders that it does, it was never a real threat that the U.S. faced. 

I think this article is spot on with the problems in U.S. foreign policy and how geography affects our culture and our ideas of how the world works.

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Thinking like a Geographer

WARNING! This video contains explicit geographical scenes that may offend the non-worldy-wise.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This music video is just for fun, but there is some solid content embedded in the lyrics...if you never want your students to laugh or smile, I do not recommend sharing this with your classes.  If your students already see you a goofy, fun-loving teacher, this might be right in your wheelhouse.   


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education.

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dilaycock's comment, March 25, 2013 10:10 PM
Love it. Thanks for this Seth. Just in time to promote Geography at parent/teacher night!
Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:34 AM

A facetious look into the world of studying Geography. These students have obviously gone to a masive effort to explore their passion for Geography. While it may not be a stereotypically academic or intellectual piece, this video is a great representation of how a Geographer thinks broadly, critically and evaluatively.

Carmen Martinez's curator insight, August 26, 2014 12:17 PM

Interesting video!

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The United States of YA

The United States of YA | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A while back, I posted in the forums asking for people to help me find a YA book for every single state in the US.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While I can't vouch for all of these books (I read more children's literature than Young Adult), I absolutely love the idea of this project.  This is a great way to make geography a cross curricular activity, especially for an English class or just for fun.  Scroll down on the right side of this image to see all the books/states on the list.  The geographic content of some of these books are minimal, but that's not the worst thing that can happen if more students are reading.  What books are at the top of your reading list?

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SchoolandUniversity's comment, February 16, 2013 2:17 AM
The United States of YA. Hey guys! This isn't an official challenge, but I really wanted to do it.
Lori Johnson's comment, February 16, 2013 9:49 AM
My favorites on the list: Under the Blood Red Sun, Deadline, The Fault in our Stars, and Dairy Queen.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 16, 2013 7:37 PM

This is for all you avid readers out there!

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GeoEd Voices Online

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the best free professional development opportunities are found online as educators develop Personal Leaning Networks (PLN).  This is a sampling of important voices from my PLN, with important links, updates and perspectives--so glad to be a part of your PLNs!

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Why Geography Matters . . . But Is So Little Learned

Why Geography Matters . . . But Is So Little Learned | Geography Education | Scoop.it

I will once again preach to the choir, but with the hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This article by Walter McDougall (2003 by Orbis) is worth reviewing and is a good reading assignment to start the school year.  The link is to a PDF version of the article. 

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Geographers Making a Difference

"Geography is a broad and diverse field, but one thing geographers have in common is using a geographic perspective to have an impact on the world. In this video, a few talk about the many ways that geography helps them to make a difference." 


This video is a great demonstration of the diverse and practical applications of geography.  This is a great answer to the oft-asked question, "but what does a geographer DO?"


Tags: geography, video, geo-inspiration, AAG, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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mapsdotcom's curator insight, February 28, 2014 11:48 AM

How can you make a difference with Geography? What does it mean to you?

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:22 PM

I. This video not only answers why geographers are important, but also what important things do they do. This video is a demonstration about the diverse and practical applications of geography, also explaining the various effects of geography. For example, geography can effect logistics, marketing, sales and government affairs. 

 

II. Although APHUG has immensely elevated my knowledge of geographers roles, this video told me things that geographers do that i was not aware of. For example, geographers doing research on coastal communities with the sea rise due to arctic melting and climate change. Geographers study the environment as well as the human-environment interaction, contrary to common belief that geographers only study land formations and urban patterns. 

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'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded

'Geography Education' posts Geo-coded | Geography Education | Scoop.it

I'm pleased to announce that for GIS Day, I created a map that has hyperlinks to regionally specific posts that I put on 'Geography Education.'  This map was created using ArcGIS Online (here's a free tutorial on how to to use ArcGIS Online tailored for K-12 educators).  This is just another way to search for materials on this site.  Feel free to embed this map on your webpage or share the link.  I'll add more tags in the future as well (just click on the icon to get a pop-up, then click on the image to see the posts).  Happy GIS Day!

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Jamie Strickland's comment, November 16, 2012 9:15 AM
How cool is this!! This will make it even easier to teach my World Regional and Global Connections courses! Thanks, Seth.
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:40 AM
Overall I think this is a good map. There are a few countries that I think could have better abbreviations, North Korea for example is labeled "N" and South Korea is labeled "SK". I went and looked for an "NK" label and there wasn't one. The map is flawed in that way because of the shortage of tools the program gives you to use. The shortage of tools also leads to many places with the same globe image or same lettering as other places. I think you did a good job with what you had available to use.
Charles Matley's comment, November 19, 2012 11:46 AM
This map is great. I The use of the national geographic map makes it more manageable and appealing to the eye. The categorization of posts into geographic locations is very clever. It could potentially be viewed as more "fun" because it is interactive.
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Pigskin Geography

Pigskin Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Pigskin Geography is a 17-week program that motivates students to learn United States geography by tracking the travels of competing professional football teams with the NFL schedule.


Pigskin Geography is an incredibly dynamic way to teach the geography of the United States. Specifically tailored for 4-6 grade students, this program gives students a series of 17 weekly activities that are adapted to the NFL schedule that week. These questions do NOT rely on football knowledge, but uses this as an opportunity to introduce vocabulary teams, and explore other places. For example: “This week the New Orleans Saints will ‘march’ over Cairo, IL, going to their game in Green Bay, WI. Locate Cairo at the southern end of the Illinois. Cairo is located at the CONFLUENCE of the _______ River and the _________________River.”


Tags: USA, sport, K12, geography, GeographyEducation, training.

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Christopher John's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:14 PM

Football Stuff for Geography

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President Obama on Geography Education

President Obama participated in this year's National Geographic Bee to to "celebrate the important role that geography plays in all our lives."  During that event he made a statement that I think geographers should use more.  Go to 0:45-1:10 in the video clip to hear this message or see the transcript below. 


"The study of geography is about more than just memorizing places on a map. It's about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exists across continents. And in the end, it's about using all that knowledge to help bridge divides and bring people together."   


-President Barack Obama


Tags: Geography, GeographyEducation, video, geo-inspiration.

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GIS student's comment, September 9, 2012 10:24 PM
This is a great step for America. Nothing better than the President of the United States pushing for Geography and Geography Education. President Obama tells us what geography really is about, "It's about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exists across continents." This is something that every student should know because without appreciating diversity and culture, how can one truly be American, a land where diversity is its heritage.
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William Pattison - 4 Traditions of Geography

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article (download here) is a classic; one of the most well-cited articles from the Journal of Geography.  

 

Tags: Geography Education, Geography.

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jfraley0032's curator insight, July 10, 2013 3:04 PM

NIce explaination of the four traditions breaks it down well on page 3

RachaelDurbin's curator insight, July 4, 2014 1:23 PM

Great for Unit 2: Part 1

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Assessing Online Sources

Assessing Online Sources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tweet from Earth Pics (screenshot preserved for when it gets taken down).  Retweeted over 1,000 times in the first hour.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a real island...well, sort of.  It is an island off the coast of Thailand (most certainly not Ireland) and there is no castle on the top.  Photoshopping and easy file sharing make it harder to assess the validity of online resources (this fantastic digital manipulation is the work of Jan Oliehoek).  Most students start their research with online sources.  This isn't to pretend that that I've never mistakenly assumed that some online content was accurate when it wasn't true; I think we all have.  I think that it's an important conversation to have with our students so they can be more critical consumers of online information and use some geographic skills to assess the quality of that information. 

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:57 AM

students need to be very careful in the type of sources that they used to glean information. People can manipulate photos and suggest things as fact when they are completetly made up. It is understandable that Wikipedia can not be used as an entireyl reliable source because people have access to add whatever they want to the content matter. Photoshop and other online tools can be used to trick people into beleiving certain things. This photo claiming to be from ireland is really from Thailand is a small island but the castle itself on the top os photoshoped and the image was retweeded like crazy within the first hor. wee must check our sources and make sure that we are getting good primary or at least good secondary services from legit websites.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 5:08 PM

This just shows that you can't believe everything you see on the internet. In this picture it is said to be of an island in Ireland but in reality it is in Thailand. People believe what they want to believe.

morgan knight's curator insight, October 8, 2014 1:00 PM

Before reading this article, I assumed that I was capable of telling fictional from factual information apart. But now, after having my eyes opened, I realize that the internet can truly play you like a puppet. From this article, I've now learned that there are more ways than one to judge the authenticity of a site. one such way is to search for an "original" copy of whatever it may be that you're researching. If none pop up, you have the true article.

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What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like?

What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Seth Dixon, a Rhode Island College geography professor and the coordinator of the RI Geography Education Alliance, gave the keynote address at the Thinking Geographically about International Issues 2013 summer institute, in a talk entitled What Does Good Geography Teaching Look Like?

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was delighted to speak at Brown University this summer as a part of the Choices Program's summer institute.  This is the video of that talk (as well as the hyperlinked slides) that is my modest attempt to tackle such a monumental question in my profession.


Tags: geography educationteacher training.

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Alejandro Restrepo's comment, August 4, 2013 12:22 AM
Great work
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:25 AM

This is a great video and sa reminder of how we should be approaching our teaching of the Australian Curriculum. 

Jarrod Dodds's curator insight, April 13, 2014 8:49 PM

In this video, Seth Dixon demonstrates a profound knowledge of geographical concepts . More importantly, it's his delivery and approach to teaching those concepts.

 

Watch this video and respond to the questions.

 

1) Highlight what methods the professor uses to engage students effectively.

 

2) Why do you think those methods are important, particularly for the subject of geography?

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Belonging to this place: A conversation with Yi-Fu Tuan

Belonging to this place: A conversation with Yi-Fu Tuan | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Humanist geography, a movement within the field of human geography (itself a sub-field of geography) arose in the 1970s as a way to counter what humanists saw as a tendency to treat places as mere sites or locations. Instead, a humanist geographer would argue, the places we inhabit have as many personalities as those whose lives have intersected with them. And the stories we tell about places often say as much about who we are, as about where our feet are planted.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Anytime a geographer uses the phrase "sense of place," they owe an intellectual debt of gratitude to Yi-Fu Tuan This article is an introduction to the man and his work that is accessible to all audiences.   


Tags: place, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Romana Quintel's curator insight, May 14, 2013 12:05 AM

An interesting way to view Aboriginal people's link to country.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:38 AM

Articulo que introduce a la obra del geógrafo humanista Yi-Fu Tuan, uno de los 21 historiadores para el siglo XXI que José Enrique Ruiz-Domènec seleccionó en su libro Rostros para la historia

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Geocube

Geocube | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Geocube is an attractive online resource about Geography. Geocube is based on the principle of the Rubik Cube with six faces and 54 topics. It is a virtual and easily accessible website which is available online for free. Move the Geocube around with your mouse and explore the faces and topics.Geocube provides an accessible way to read, see and watch what Geography is and geographers do."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive resource is worth exploring and letting students explore it at home or within a computer lab environment.  Geocube isn't just a single random link; Geocube is a portal to numerous topics, regions and themes that allows the user to explore what geography is without being constrained to do so in a linear fashion.  Having been voted by the American Association of School Librarians as one of the "Top 25 websites for Teaching and Learning," Geocube comes highly recommended, and rightfully so.  This is a must-see as it puts the world of geography at your fingertips. 


Tags: geography education. edtech, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 14, 2013 4:39 PM

Geografhy education I¡ve  recently open it

Maricarmen Husson's comment, April 14, 2013 4:41 PM
I've recentli open it, is a good resourse for students and every peoples who likes geography
Jeffrey Miller's curator insight, August 4, 2014 11:12 PM

Fantastic photography

 

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I hope that you enjoy the content and materials that you find on this website.  This represents the best news, materials and resources that I have found that can be used in geography (and other) classrooms. 

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SRINIVAS KASULLA's comment, August 31, 2013 2:19 PM
Awsome liked the map and would like to contribute ....thanks for such a nice article Peters Energy :)
SRINIVAS KASULLA's comment, August 31, 2013 2:19 PM
Awsome liked the map and would like to contribute ....thanks for such a nice article Peters Energy :)
Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, August 31, 2013 7:51 PM

Love this Geography Education site! Set up two ways: regionally and thematically so you can find lesson ideas easily.

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Digital Globes, a New Way to View the World

Digital Globes, a New Way to View the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Their expense has so far made them rare, but with prices coming down, these glowing, programmable spheres are set to become more common.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Due to the expense, only science centers and major museums can afford these digital globes that we see in futuristic movies.  However, as with all new technologies, the price will drop as it is refined and made available for larger market, even if that time is still a ways off.  If this were available in your classroom, it would be splashy, but how much added value would it bring?  What kind of lessons could you teach with this?

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Tom Perran's curator insight, January 11, 2013 6:21 PM

Very exciting development in classroom technology!

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Restoring Geography in America

Restoring Geography in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Focus (WILL) - listen online, on demand topics and episodes, location, contact, schedule and broadcast information
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is the audio archive of a 2007 radio interview with Jerome Dobson, Geography Professor at the University of Kansas and President of the American Geographical Society.  In this interview he discusses many topics including the importance of geographic education, how to define geography and showing the relevance of the disciple in solving real-world problems.  He gives historical context as to why geography became minimized within the United States.   


Tags: geography education, geo-inspiration, podcast.

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Tony King's comment, January 10, 2013 11:31 AM
This is a uniquely American phenomenon, and a very unfortunate one. The study of geography makes you much more aware of the planet and how human interactions are gradually destroying it.
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All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography

All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We have created 10 activities for teaching about geography using Times content, all related to the National Geography Standards.


This is a set of 10 activities that all use New York Times resources are all connected to the National Geography Standards and applicable to any social studies classroom.  It's great to see geography getting this publicity in the NY Times, but it's fantastic to have these easy-to-use ideas for the classroom that are rich in content.  

 

Tags: K12, Geography Education.

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Following 'Geography Education'

Following 'Geography Education' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.

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Make your own Mega Map

Make your own Mega Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I love National Geographic’s MapMaker Kit as a great way to have students produce their own oversized Mega Maps  (8 rows of 17 columns), especially if you only have access to a printer that p...


Here are 6 lessons and activities designed around National Geographic’s Mega Maps and Tabletop Maps that can be printed with ordinary 8.5 x11 sheets of paper.  This is a perfect way to celebrate and get ready for the upcoming Geography Awareness Week (Nov . 11-17). 


Tags: mapping, K12, National Geographic, Geography Education

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Geography Strikes Back

Geography Strikes Back | Geography Education | Scoop.it
To understand today's global conflicts, forget economics and technology and take a hard look at a map, writes Robert D. Kaplan.


This is a timely article that shows the importance of geography in understanding current events throughout the world.  Also included in this link are videos and pictures connected to an interactive map that highlights a few global conflicts.  Students would benefit from reading this article in preparation for completing a news article assignment.  Geographic context always matters; it might not tell the whole story but it will certainly shape it.   


Tags: Geography, GeographyEducation, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Andrew Shears, PhD's comment, September 9, 2012 12:41 PM
Really good critical reaction to this piece from Derek Gregory: http://geographicalimaginations.com/2012/09/08/geography-strikes-back/
Seth Dixon's comment, December 11, 2012 11:37 AM
Thanks for sharing that article Andy, I'm just seeing it now!
Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:05 PM

  This informative article gives us a different insight to politics, claiming that countries action in politics, war, etc. are based upon where they are located. It goes on to describe different examples containing spatial, economic and political conflict. Afterward, it describes what this has to do and how it effects people (and their governments).

 

  This gives us a great insight on how space is afflicted with the territorial dimensions of politics. It relates to why certain nations make the different decisions they do and how it is related to our everyday lives.

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What If?

What If? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This blogpost answers the (often unasked) question:  What would the world be like if the land masses were spread out the same way as now - only rotated by an angle of 90 degrees? While purely hypothetical, this is an exercise in applying real geographic thinking to different situations.  Anything that you would correct? 


Tags: weather climate, geography, GeographyEducation, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, physical

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Dania's comment, September 5, 2012 11:41 PM
well!!!
I'll tell you that it's why God created Mother Nature. maybe what we think is bad now in nature can be worse for the the Earth and human being... I think if the ground is moved 90 degree, many natural phenomena would happened in many regions of the Earth which would be harm to people, plants and animals that live in those regions. Plus, the population of poor nation would not be prepared for those climate changes.... many people would die or they have to move from those regions.
Jeff F's comment, September 6, 2012 12:50 AM
This looks like a map from the classic NES game Dragon Warrior II only flipped upside down. #nerd

Anyways, I think the most densely populated areas would be around the central ocean with New York and London being primate cities of their respected hemispheres.

Given that that the central ocean area is in an equatorial region, agriculture would likely not be very prosperous in these regions. Instead, I imagine New York becoming the center of an imperial superpower. Seeing as the most fertile regions of both South and North America are in temperate areas, agriculture would be a dominating industry.

The northern hemisphere on the other I hand I imagine would be largely undeveloped and rural. The "breadbaskets" of this hemispher are located much further inland from the central ocean.
Ian Roberts's comment, September 11, 2012 8:57 PM
First off I would like to say travel to Europe would be much easier and the Pacific Ocean grew even larger. One thing that really got me wondering was whether the world would be northern hemisphere centered or southern hemisphere centered. Currently, there are many more people in the northern hemisphere, so things like the summer olympics are held in our summer, their winter. BUt with the world turned ninety degrees, the population will be much more similar. The north will probably still have more people, but the south has America. It would be interesting to see how they would decide that conflict.