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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London

An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The extent of the campaign is shocking.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This map is just overwhelming when you consider that each data point represents a bomb dropped on the city. 

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:30 AM

It was called the Blitz for a reason. For months, nobody in London was safe.  As seen on the map, nearly every inch of London was affected by Nazi bombs. Not only were there bombs falling, but also planes and other war machines involved.  The modern version of London is surely a rebuilt version of its 1940's counterpart.

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:46 PM

This is one of my favorite maps that I have seen. How devastating it must have been to live in London at the time, never knowing where the next one would land to destroy the city.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 4:50 AM

This map shows the locations for the nearly 2000 bombs which were dropped on London during the Blitz in WWII. The bombs were dropped entirely inside the ring of M25 London Orbital Motorway which encircles London. The bombs are most concentrated in the center of the ring, likely to do the most damage, to either infrastructure or the people.

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A Barrier to Peace

A Barrier to Peace | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Why would they want to pull down these walls?” asks William Boyd mildly as he offers me a cup of tea in his home at Cluan Place, a predominantly Loyalist area of east Belfast.


These walls, orginally installed in the late 60s to protect Belfast residents during "the Troubles."  Today, some argue that these walls are now barriers to the peace process as they continue defacto segregation.  Walls, as barriers to diffusion, stifle communication, cooperation and interaction.  Still, these walls are symbols of communal identity and icons in the cultural landscape.  For more academic work on this, see Peter Shirlow's Belfast: Segregation, Violence and the City.

 

Questions to Consider: How would a wall through an already culturally and politically divided city impact both sides of the wall?  Today, are the walls beneficial to peace in Northern Ireland?       


Tags: Ireland, states, borders, political

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 4:38 PM

The walls in Belfast Ireland were put in the 60's to protect the residents and today many people argue they need to come down. My grandmother just returned from a trip to Ireland and Belfast was one of the areas they went. She said it was very sad, Christians had to walk on one side of the street and Protestans on the other in one area and the tour bus driver was being voice monitered by the police the whole time. There is so much seperation in Befast because of that wall and more people dont want it taken down then want it down for anything to be done. 

Marissa Roy's curator insight, October 30, 2013 9:14 AM

The barrier in Belfast, Ireland is an impressive one. It has been there since the 1960s and having it there has become a security for the residence on both sides. Neither side wants it taken down, however, they have extremely different political/religious views. It seems strange to me that these people would prefer living in prison-like conditions just because that is the way it has been for so long. So long as the physical walls stay up, so will the cultural walls between these people.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 5:13 AM

This article is about large walls which were constructed fifty years ago to separate a part Belfast, Northern Ireland to protect citizens from conflicts between loyalists and separatists. Q wall separating people could temporarily protect people from violent conflict, but it would undoubtedly ensure continued conflict and intensify the feeling of "Us vs. Them." Though the people interviewed from both sides of the wall in the article like the wall since it gives them a feeling of security, the wall is likely damaging to a peace process in Northern Ireland.

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Eurozone unemployment hits record high

Eurozone unemployment hits record high | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The 17-nation bloc had a jobless rate of 11.6 per cent in September, while inflation eased slightly in the last month.


Although some countries in the Eurozone have lower unemployment rates like Austria (4.4%) and Germany (5.4%), more are in the worst collective tailspin since the creation of the common currency.  Spain has the worst unemplyment rate at 25.8% of the adult population out of work.  It has taken a nasty cultural and political turn as resentments and frustrations are boiling over in the Eurozone.  Some are derisively referring to the struggling southern European countries as P.I.G.S. (Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain). 


Tags: Europe, supranationalism, currency, labor, economic

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 9, 2013 9:20 AM

A big problem in the EU.  There are countries feeling the pinch becasue of the problems of other countries.  They feel why do we have to foot the bill of so many other countries that are just failing in their own economies through their own fault.  Sounds about the same as in the US when people say why do I have to pay for others mistakes and pay more in taxes.  One is on a macro scale, one is on a micro scale. 

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Why leave the West for India?

Why leave the West for India? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rising numbers of people of Indian origin born in the West are moving to the country their parents left decades ago in search of opportunity and a cultural connection, reports the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan.


Since 2005, the Indian government has been encouraging people of Indian descent and former Indian nationals to return to India.  For many Indians living in the UK, there are more and better economic opportunities for them within India.   Migrants have many reasons for moving (including cultural factors), but the primary pull factor is most certainly India's ascendant importance in the global economy and rising IT industries. 

 

Tags: India, South Asia, migration, immigration, Europe, colonialism, unit 2 population

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 8, 2013 2:13 PM

There is a rising number of Indian origin born in the west that are moving back to India. One reason would be India's economy is growing faster then the US and England's. India has many more opportunities for new wealth and it is attracting the young entrepreneurs as well. Another reason they are moving back is for cultural connection that they are not recieving where they are now. Many have said that they are looked at as different and not accepted and that is why they want to go back to India, so that they feel that acceptance. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 10:43 AM

This article demonstrates the need to leave and create a better life for not only this family but for other families that feel as if their life and societial views are putting their future in jeapody. There is a rising number of people from India that are moving to the West; where their parents were born and restaring their lives there. They are in a sense coming home to what they had left behind.

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Spanish Crisis Revives Calls For Catalan Secession

Spain's dismal economy has residents of the country's richest region, Catalonia, wondering if they'd be better off going it alone. With their own language and distinct culture, Catalans have long pushed for independence from Spain.


This podcast merges several geographic strands together as economic turmoil in the southern portion of the Euro Zone has fanned the flames of cultural resentment and put discussions for Catalonian independence on the agenda for local politicians. 


Questions to ponder: Will this internal devolution cause greater disintegration in the European Union or Spain?  Would an independent Catalan be a wise move for the Catalonians?  How would their independence impact Spain?    


Tags: political, autonomy, economic, Europe, devolution, sovereignty, unit 4 political.

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Iceland's Volcanic Rivers

Iceland's Volcanic Rivers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Time and time again, we're reminded of nature's beauty. It's hard to believe, but these photos of real landscapes, not abstract paintings.


Andre Ermolaev, through his photography has captured the beauty of Iceland's geomorphology.  Being on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland has abundant volcanic ash which adds rich color to the fluvial systems.  

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.

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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 6:30 AM

This is a picture of the volcanic ash that is under Iceland's Mid-Attlantic Ridge. This shows us that nature by itself can create beauty. It is also fascinating to see because you would never think Iceland would still have the presence of volcanic ash due to it's climate.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 8:20 AM

Iceland is one of my favorite countries, and the place I most want to visit and would most likely move to if I had to leave the United States. The landscape is insanely beautiful and the population is extremely small, something I enjoy as I dislike cities and a high population density. Even the capital of Iceland looks akin to a relatively average fishing town in the Northern US or Canada, and the entire country has less people in it than any given state in the US.

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La Tomatina 2012

La Tomatina 2012 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
La Tomatina is a festival that is held in the Valencian town of Bunol, located inland from the Mediterranean Sea, that brings together thousands of people for one big tomato fight – purely for fun!


La Tomatina is a cultural festival in Spain that is world renowned for it's exuberance and playfulness.  This gallery of 26 images shows some of the dynamism and appeal to this extraordinary event where more than 40,000 people engage in the world's largest foof fight using upwards of 100 tons of tomatoes in the yearly food fight known as 'La Tomatina.'


Notice the signs for storing backpacks and luggage that are now pastered with tomatoes on the store in the background of the image.  These hastily-composed, informal signs are written in three languages (Spanish, English and Japanese).  What does this tell us about the festival?  Also, notice how the comments section revolves around the concepts of waste, poverty and consumption. 


Tags: Europe, foodtourism, seasonal, culture, unit 3 culture, consumption.

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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 12, 2012 12:03 PM

I find myself caught between respecting the practices of other cultures as I can’t not help but acknowledge that this is still very extravagant and wasteful although we in America are no better. This use of food can be seen globally as just another example of the widening depravation as undeveloped countries may view food solely for consumption while developed countries grow food for commerce with the notion that once you pay for it, it does not matter how you use it.
Nicholas Rose's comment, September 13, 2012 6:59 AM
This article is very interesting to say the least. The reason why is because culturally even this is the largest food fight in the world involving only tomatoes but it has been a critical cultural tradition in Spain for many years and will still become a tradition to Spain.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 10:02 AM

Spaghetti anyone? La Tomatina is a large tomatoe fight held in Bunol. It is a cultural festival in Spain purely for fun. Thousands meet in the streets to throw tomatoes and through the pictures shown, one can only imagine how many tomatoes get thrown at this festival. The streets are flooded red!

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Can Europe Survive the Rise of the Rest?

Can Europe Survive the Rise of the Rest? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The European Union will never manage to compete with China and other rising powers unless it unites politically, scales up and becomes a genuine giant.


This author argues that the main driving forces that led towards European unification in the decades after WWII are now gone or are diminished in importance.  As many of the economies of Europe, especially southern Europe are struggling, it is time for the European Union to rediscover and restructure it's raison d'être--it's reason for being--if it wants to continue to compete on a global level.   


Tags: Supranationalism, Europe, political, unit 4 political and economic.

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Amy Marques's curator insight, July 29, 2013 6:05 AM

This is a great overview of what is truely happening in the world. How Europe is still seen as a travel destination and perhaps turism is one of its strengths in terms of keeping the economies going in European countries, but its true that much of the economic activity is starting to shift over to Asian countries and its something the "big three", China, the US, and Europe are going to have to look at. These three primarily relied on eachother, but maybe its time to start looking at buisness affairs with other nations like Singnapore and Japan.

Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 30, 2013 8:41 AM

In reviewing this change in economic power in the world would show how business in moving to other parts the world due to how cheaply they can be produced.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 8:10 AM

Many of Europe's initial reasons for uniting have disappeared, but there lies another reason to continue doing so, that being the ability to compete with the US and China as a major superpower. Of course Europe isn't united in the same way that those countries are, and are still individual countries, but a strong economic union might be in their best interest economically. This doesn't mean it would be a good thing though, as consolidating the many countries and identities into one governing body is potentially dangerous, both for the freedom of the people, and for the stability of the region. One could imagine a scenario in the future where former Croatians are being dictated to by a government based out of France or Germany, that have no local or ethnic connection to them.

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Using Google Earth to Map Your Trips

Using Google Earth to Map Your Trips | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Download KML FILE to BEST view this interactive map within Google Earth. My wife and I took a fabulous trip to the United Kingdom and Greece that was primarily for a writing project that she is wor...

 

I usually redirect readers to articles, lessons, materials and resources that other people have created.  I would like to deviate from that model and share something original that I have created in Google Earth to share photos, give tour guide commentary and give a geography lesson.  The sample is from a trip I was on about a month ago.  I envision my introductory mapping students to create one of these next semester. 

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ORBIS-Historical Geography of Transportation

ORBIS-Historical Geography of Transportation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a tremendous resources for understanding the historical geography of the Ancient Roman Empire and the transportation network.  Using ORBIS you can simulate travel logistics in the pre-modern era.  The differences between the fastest, cheapest and shortest routes between any two given locations can be very telling about the geographic factors impacting transportation.   

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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.

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chris tobin's curator insight, March 22, 2013 1:23 PM

Here is an article March 2013 updating the latest in Wales

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-politics-21683771

 

"Silk Commission:  Mixed Reaction Over Devolution Power" 3/16/2013 BBC

 

     Since 1997 there have been many changes in the devolution processes Westminster still holds the most governing decisions but it seems that the UK taxpayers do not want their money to go to other countries for public services. 

Railing is a big issue since there have been alot of plans for improving infrastructure in transportation to build up the economy.  This will be particularly interesting to follow in the news.

     Liberal Democrat Leader Kirsty Williams stated a need for a new model of devolution  with clear definitions and the Conservative Lib. Dem. coalition's 114 page document to the Silk Commission states policing, broadcasting, and energy projects should remain under Westminster but to devolve teachers pay and rail franchises.

 

 

 

    

    

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 6:51 PM

The devolution of the United Kingdom is taking place at a legistlative level right now- if/when will Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland vote to actually secede? The article made mention that people in Britain are starting to get angry that they are subsidizing programs in Scotland that the English pay for themselves. What are the benefits to being a part of the United Kingdom? What's the best balance of power for all involved?

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:21 PM

This shift can reshape the countries in many ways, financially, and the over all quality of life. A place will do better with connections than standing alone. This may help with international relation issues and build new relationships. When places depend on one another it can reshape the Country. It can also help with investment and jobs. 

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Erosion: The White Cliffs of Dover

Erosion: The White Cliffs of Dover | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thousands of tons of chalk from the famous White Cliffs of Dover have collapsed into the sea following a huge rockfall.

 

An excellent example of erosion and the processes that have shaped an iconic landscape.  The accompanying article has numerous pictures from a variety of angles that truly tell the story.   

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Europe according to Estonians

This video is not very educational, filled with bad stereotypes and some truly inaccurate (and potentially offensive) statements.  Still, I show it every semester as the rationale for why we need to study more about Europe (but mainly because my students LOVE watching it).    

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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 10, 2012 7:35 AM
Hilarious yet annoying in a way, very stereotypical but also educational. I liked this video.
Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 6:25 PM

while this realy wasnt geographicaly accurate, it was a very funny video.  it showed that possibly people from Estonia really do view the rest of Europe that way.  

chris tobin's comment, March 22, 2013 11:05 AM
Thanks for sharing this video......pretty funny
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More than a club: FC Barcelona and Catalonia's road to independence

"As Catalonia goes to the polls, Sid Lowe looks at one of the region's great cultural sporting icons and its role in Catalan identity..."


Seth Dixon's insight:

Sports and cultural identity of a region are often intertwined. As Catalonia is poised to break from Spain, this video shows how the local teams (especially FC Barcelona) are at the center of political identity and part of the very fabric of the political movement that is pushing for independence.  For more, see this recent Geography in the News article.


Tags: sport, Spain, Europe, devolution, autonomy.

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Jessica Martel's curator insight, April 28, 2013 1:37 PM

its understood that catalonie has a completely different country from the rest of spain. In fact many people associate catalonia as a seperate country. It would be cool to see spain let them have thier independence. However that would mean spain would lose land and money. For the most part, atleast the catalonia poeple are expressing thier feelings and wishes in a humane manor, rather than with vilolence

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Old-School Library

Old-School Library | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This would be the perfect place to study.  Next time I'm at L'Istituto delle Scienze, Palazzo Poggi, Bologna, I will definitely find this spot.  

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Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves?

Little England: What's Left If Scotland Leaves? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What is more likely to happen first: Greece will leave the eurozone, or Scotland will leave the UK?


Although there is currently only about 30% of Scotland that would support independence, this is something that will be gaining importance.  The United Kingdom is a complex political entity, with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland connected with England.  The "divorce referendum" will be help on October 2014 to see if Scotland wishes to dissolve this union and many of the political and economic events throughout Europe will be seen through this prism, especially the Euro Zone crisis in southern European countries (e.g.-Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal).  The possibility that this might happen are small, but as the article stated, "not zero." 


Tags: devolution, supranationalism, political, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:27 PM

Good for Scotland... as anyone that has watched Braveheart knows, all they need is Mel Gibson to fight for their independence, and they will surely win!  I know some people that play the bagpies, and I like the Scottish music better than much English music.  I don't know much about the UK, so I have little to guide me in favor or against Scotland declaring independence, but aw heck, why not...  The US declared independence, and it seemed to work out for them until... whenever...? forever? it depends on what you use as criteria to look at it...  But live and let live, let people do what they want, the only advice to that is not to let people harm others.  That way, true peace can be achieved.  Harmony, instead of harm.  So I would advocate for Scotland to wear women's clothing with turtle shells in their crotches and dance to celebrate their independence if that's what they want, as long as there are no epic battle sequences that precede or follow their dancing.  Don't be an elitist, open your eyes, the governments own your brothers and their lives... We must work to change this.

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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.


In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   


Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 30, 2013 12:02 PM

Incredible to see this kind of work.  I really hope this helps people remember what happened and what was given up in World War II.  As we lost more vets every day, we really need to make sure their scarifice is not forgotten.  Incredible piece of work here.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 9:56 AM

Historian Jo Teeuwisse creates dramatic imagery by overlaying negative images onto current images. These World War II photos show how different things were at the time and how people walk these streets everyday and may not even think twice about the streets history. Art is the best way to show emotion, and Jo Teeuwisse's art imposes a creative take on this.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 8:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

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Hiking Preikestolen in Norway

Hiking to the top of Preikestolen (the Pulpit Rock) near Stavanger, Norway. An amazing and wondrous hike.


Seth Dixon's insight:


For the inner explorer in all of us, this is a geographic dream. Click here to read more about this fantastic climb from a National Geographic explorer


Tags: Europe, landforms, NationalGeographic, Norway.

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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 6:28 AM

This video shows us people hiking on a massive landform. Preikestolen is located in Norway and is nick named "the Pulpit Rock" int the video you get to see up close what this extraordinary mountain looks like.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 8:23 AM

This is added to my To-do list for visiting Norway for sure. As I've said before, hiking is one of my favorite activities as it allows you to see some really striking places in the world. Natural environments are usually more interesting to me than man made structures. So these types of things are my favorite destinations.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2:28 PM

Hiking the Preikestolen is another natural wonder. Beauty can be seen from all angles of this hike. From its clear blue waters, to its green trees. Hiking this land is a great way to get some fresh air and enjoy all that Norway has to offer. The topic of the rock has spectacular views that excite hikers.

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Tiny Capital

Created by Eirik Evjen.  The production of this video was made out of 76,940 single photos.


"Norway has recently reached 5 million inhabitants and the capital is growing rapidly. The city scene in Oslo is steadily thickening with taller buildings, more people and the never-ending construction sites. Being by far the most populated city in Norway with 613 000 inhabitants, most Norwegians look to Oslo as a major capital. However, if one compares Oslo to other international capitals, Oslo only ranks as the 112th largest. Oslo is indeed a major capital, just a small one…"


Tags: art, urban, Europe, landscape, unit 7 cities.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2:39 PM

Oslo may be small in size, but it is quickly growing and advancing. Norway's capital is now a place of constant travel and exploration. The 76,940 photos used to create this video embrace Oslo's city rush and functionality. 

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England, Britain and the UK

England, Britain and the UK | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is the short version of the differences between these interrelated places and terms; the long version is much more complicated than this. 


Tags: Europe, political, unit 4 political, states, toponyms.

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Ally Clark/Mayse Thao's curator insight, February 7, 8:09 AM

This is kinda like the video we watched where that guy who talks fast explained the uk. Oh and this is political

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Pere Lachaise: Cemetery's virtual tour

Pere Lachaise: Cemetery's virtual tour | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Looking for Jim Morrison's grave?  There are countless famous people buried in Paris' most famous cemetery.  This virtual tour is as close as most of us will get to exploring it this school year.

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

 

One of the free response questions in the 2012 AP Human Geography test focused on increasing Muslim population in many European countries.  The Muslim community has (in the view of most Europeans polled) has not adequately assimilated into European society, and with many Europeans feeling a cultural threat, have created a politically charged situation.  Has Europe failed to integrate Muslims or have Muslims failed to integrate in Europe?  Is this a problem?  Why or why not?  To see the APHG test question, click here:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap_frq_human_geo_2012.pdf

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, October 3, 2012 5:49 PM
As we leearned in class, Europe has a declining population. If Europe continues to ban certain religions and culture, then obviously its population will continue to decline. It seems as though religion and poitics clash, just as they do elsewhere around the world. If women want to wear headscarves, let them. They are proud of their religion just as many of us are. Seems to me that the world is becoming more secular, restricitve and intrusive than religious.
Shayna and Kayla's curator insight, February 6, 9:29 AM

This represents the religion section because Europe is restricting islamic symbols causing controversy .

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 10:18 AM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

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Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still Divided

Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still Divided | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Twenty years ago this week, the Bosnian war began with the siege of Sarajevo, the longest in the history of modern warfare. The siege ended more than three years later, leaving 100,000 dead — the worst atrocities in Europe since World War II.

 

Ethnic and political conflict led to the disintegration of Yugoslavia in the 1990s.  This NPR podcast is a good recap that shows the devolutionary forces of ethnic, religious, cultural and political differences that led to tragic violence and ethnic cleansing. 

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Derek Ethier's comment, October 10, 2012 10:59 PM
It's unbelievable that ethnic crimes continue to be committed in the world today, even after the atrocities performed by Hitler. When Yugoslavia collapsed, the power vacuum left behind caused hundreds of thousands to lose their lives. In Africa even in the present day, these kinds of things continue. It makes you wonder what kind of a world we are really living in.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:54 PM

These stories are never pleasant.  It seems Europe after World War II and the fall of the Soviet Union were left in a strange middle ground.  With so many cultures, religions, languages all on one continent, its not hard to believe that Europe has been the stage of so much conflict all throughout history.  People are and always have been intermingling between countries.  Many of the countries in Europe are easy to travel throughout, such as a car or bus ride which may only take a few hours in some cases.  This gives easy access for immigration in which history shows that people try to flock to opportunity or to where there are people similar to them.  These patterns can sometimes be unwelcoming to current citizens and lead to violence and cleansing in extreme cases, all because of disagreements based on beliefs and traditions.

After all the wars fought, looking at Europe as a whole is tricky.  Though the countries all have political boundaries and jurisdictions, the lifestyle and what goes on within the borders can be very segregated.  Even in the 21st century, the divisions of people in the same country, holding the same citizenship, shows that things aren't always as good as they seem.

Devon marzo's curator insight, February 6, 9:37 AM

This article show political because the population is protesting against the government 

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Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

Urban ecology: what economic forces created the rationale for building Venice?  What environmental factors are currently threatening it?  Will economic or environmental forces win out? Location: do the economic advantages of a location outweigh the environmental liabilities of the location?  How do these competing factors influence the development of a city?  For additional information on this story see: http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-venice-hasnt.html

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:47 PM

The famous city in Italy is sinking, and quickly.  It seems that the transient opportunities of a transient town are like that of other areas exposed to natural inclemence- such as New Orleans, and earthquake zones.  Sooner or later, places that are exposed to disaster will become inhabitable, and possibly abandoned.  When I hear of this city sinking, it makes me think of the Titanic, and how people should likely jump ship out of this situation, before the whole city 'goes under.'  I also think of marshy areas that would not be well-suited for development and inhabitance, and it seems that there is a history in the town that united people to live there in spite of the abundance of water.  Some of my ancestors were from Italy, and I wouldn't want harm to come to their homeland, but it really makes me wonder why they chose such a place to live...  It seems likely to me that the mere fact that it was sinking was not really considered much back then;  they were not as realistically concerned about the longevity of the city in the long run, than they were about the 'now' and the time at hand.  This reflects many facets of humanity and the hedonistic lifestyles that accompany many humans.  Humans that live for today and forget about tomorrow are doomed to live a life of sorry.  Humans that live for tomorrow and not today are out of touch and fail to seize the day.  Humans that live for today but remember tomorrow are the masons that build stairways to new lands for their descendents, and along with that, myriad new possibilities for positive opportunities.  I think some of the wisdom of Italy was put into its architecture and structural design, so that we might remember- we are dying in this life, just as Venice sinks, but we should live life as best as we can, and pave the way for future generations.  Like so, the dumping of wastes into the ocean seems tiny at first, but accumulates over many generations and will leave many ocean species dead, and harm the overall functionality of the Earth as a whole.  Let Venice be a reminder.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 6:27 PM

So not only is Mexico City sinking, but Venice is as well, and five times faster than we thought at that. If the heart of an urban, sprawling city becomes completely destroyed what changes will be made to the outlying areas? Will they break up into multiple, smaller districts each with a central area? Where will the rich who used to reside in the heart move to?

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

Rescooped by Seth Dixon from Regional Geography
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The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

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chris tobin's comment, March 22, 2013 1:43 PM
Very clarifying information.......narrator really speaks quickly, like he just drank 5 pots of coffee and has to catch a plane or something...The You Tube Video 'Coffee The Greatest Addiction Ever' pops up next to his video
chris tobin's comment, March 22, 2013 1:43 PM
Very clarifying information.......narrator really speaks quickly, like he just drank 5 pots of coffee and has to catch a plane or something...The You Tube Video 'Coffee The Greatest Addiction Ever' pops up next to his video
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:10 PM

A great and entertaining way to explain this part of Europe.  I know I have in the past used the terms England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom to all refer to the same thing. It was also amazing to see that people are the same everywhere in that the people in Wales do not consider themselves British, much the same way the people in Sicily consider themselves Sicilain and not Italian.