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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.
Seth Dixon's insight:

How we approach the educational process itself is inherently cultural.  What sociological impacts are their for either of these paradigms?  How might these differences affect other aspects of human geography?     

Tagspodcast, education, cultureEast AsiaUSA, unit 3 culture.

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E. Erny-Newton's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:46 AM

What is described here is what psychologist Carol Dweck highlights in her research : fixed mindset vs growth mindset ; some people tend to see achievements as based on innate abilities -they have a fixed mindset. Others see them as the fruit of effort and work -they have a growth mindset.Those two groups react very differently to setbacks : fixed minsets will give up, while growth mindsets will see an opportunity to improve.For more on that, see http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/february7/dweck-020707.html ou en français : http://owni.fr/2011/02/07/apprendre-est-un-etat-d%E2%80%99esprit/

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 8:06 AM

This article has a message about the view of struggling in eastern and western cultures, and how this affects learning.  As an aspiring teacher, I found this very instructive.  The examples used were good and I really find myself wanting to read more on this topic.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 11:20 AM

In this article the resources or lack there of are a huge issue for the children in these schools. It makes me think of our society and the technology and other resources that we have aviable to and dont think twice about compared to this society that has nothing. This also triggered my mind of a prospective teacher as to thinking of the differnces between learning styles in the regions.

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).
Seth Dixon's insight:

These apartments are so small that they can only be photographed from the ceiling.  Massive urbanization with limited space means that real estate is at a premium and many laborers will not be able to afford large living spaces.  Hong Kong is an extreme example of this and it brings new meaning to the term "high-density housing." 


Tagshousing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task
Seth Dixon's insight:

Cultural preferences for boys in China has led to a gender imbalance which has some unintended consequences, especially for the those seeking to have families with limited financial resources.


Tags: gender, China, population

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Cassie Frazier's comment, May 4, 2013 5:45 PM
Today in China, love has become more about wealth than romance. Because of the gender imbalance created by the one child policy, there are many more men than women, as boys are the preferred sex. This has shifted the task of choosing a spouse to the women, and they want fancy things. Therefore, they tend to choose the rich to marry. The problem is that there are at least 40-50 million poor men in China, and the majority are alone. When men reach 30 and are still unmarried, they are called "leftovers". These men are much more likely to get into trouble. This is so sad because they are so lonely. By preferring males, China has created a huge group of men who may have to live forever alone.
Taylor Anderson's comment, May 6, 2013 10:43 AM
There is a huge gender imbalance making people choose between love and money
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 8:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

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Breaking World North Korea News

Breaking World North Korea News | Geography Education | Scoop.it

World news about North Korea. Breaking news and archival information about its people, politics and economy from The New York Times.

EA: As mentioned in class, North and South Korea would be better off united. By the looks of things, that will not be happening. Scary to think that North Korea is "testing" missiles could endanger its close neighbors. But, maybe that was the intention. I thought a new, younger president would bring a modern way of thinking to North Korea, instead it sounds like they are spiralling downhill. High unemployment, high fuel and food prices. Hopefully South Korea is prepared for any wrongdoing on North Korea's part.... The Peace Dam may keep flooding away, however it is no match for nuclear weapons

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Mongolia's Nomads

Mongolia's Nomads | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Through his Vanishing Cultures Project photographer Taylor Weidman documents threatened ways of life.  About his work in Mongolia, he states: "Mongolian pastoral herders make up one of the world's largest remaining nomadic cultures. For millennia they have lived on the steppes, grazing their livestock on the lush grasslands. But today, their traditional way of life is at risk on multiple fronts. Alongside a rapidly changing economic landscape, climate change and desertification are also threatening nomadic life, killing both herds and grazing land."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In times of ecological hardships and global economic restructuring, many children of nomadic herders are seeking employment out of the rural areas and in the urban environment.  The cultural change that this represents is for Mongolia enormous and is captured wonderfully in this photo gallery.  Pictured above are the ger (yurt) camps that ring the capital city Ulaanbaatar.  Ulaanbaatar houses a permanent population of displaced nomads. During the winter, Ulaanbaatar is the second most air-polluted capital in the world due largely to coal burning.


Tags: Mongolia, images, indigenous, culture, globalization.  

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 12, 2013 3:44 PM

What factors are threatening pastoral herders way of life? Why?

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 8:45 AM

Time for more pictures, my favorite part of scooping. Mongolia is almost entirely forgotten in US education, to the point where many of the people I know aren't even sure if there's a government at all. My favorite part of these pictures comes from the fusion of technology and tradition though. We see traditional housing and boys carrying water to their homes, and then a flat screen television in the makeshift house. Motorcycles are used to herd animals, and solar polar is used to power cell phones for the nomads. What I think is important here among other things is the idea that humanity has potentially reached a point where we cannot go backwards tech-wise. The dark ages in Europe saw knowledge being lost, and there are claims that humanity will wipe out its own tech in a great war, but now that we have the knowledge and ability to use solar panels and automobiles, I don't believe we'll ever lose them as a species.

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The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.


Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 

 

Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED

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Braden Oldham's comment, May 2, 2013 6:49 PM
The workers seem to not see their work as bad as we see it. They see it as a opportunity, bette then waht they had before.
Sarah Graham's comment, May 3, 2013 10:54 AM
I think that we often overlook the fact that life and culture is very different in these places. Here, the factory workers probably don't want the I-phones that they are making. We don't think about the people and how they WANT these jobs. These people want to make their life better, just like you and me.
Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 11:55 AM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
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Alarm as China Issues "Rules" for Disputed Area

Alarm as China Issues "Rules" for Disputed Area | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New rules announced last week to allow interceptions of ships in the South China Sea are raising concerns in the region, and in Washington, that simmering disputes with Southeast Asian countries over the waters will escalate.


According to this new announcement, Chinese ships would be allowed to search and repel foreign ships if they were engaged in illegal activities (but that is open to interpretation) if the ships were within the 12-nautical-mile zone surrounding islands that China claims. This makes the disputed territorial claims of China all the more at the center of this geopolitical maneuverings.  Much of the South China Sea would then be under Chinese control if this announcement becomes the new reality. 


Questions to Ponder: Why is China making this announcement?  Is China within their rights to make this declaration?  Who might oppose this? 

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Elderly Spur Japan Stores

Elderly Spur Japan Stores | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Unicharm Corp.’s sales of adult diapers in Japan exceeded those for babies for the first time last year. At Daiei Inc. supermarkets, customers can feel Japan aging -- literally: It has made shopping carts lighter.


Japan's demographic shifts are well-chronicled: the Japanese are having fewer children and the improvements in healthcare mean that the elderly are living longer than ever.  Combined this means that Japan's population pyramid is getting "top heavy."  This population change is having huge econmic impacts as the percentage of Japanese people is now over 23%.  Retailers and industries are heavily targeting this expanding demographic with financial clout that outspends all other cohorts.


Tags: Japan, declining population, economic, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asia, consumption.

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Inside North Korea

Go undercover with National Geographic correspondent Lisa Ling as she journeys into mysterious and reclusive North Korea.


We know so little about life in North Korea since they have the world’s least free press (that is not hyperbole--Freedom House ranks countries from 0 to 99 with 0 being the most free and 99 being the least free.  North Korea has recently "improved" its rating to 97, the worst in the world). Official coverage is highly censored and filled with government propaganda. This 2009 glimpse is incredibly poignant.


Tags: East Asia, development, states, poverty.

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61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan

61 Amazing Manhole Covers from Japan | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Manhole covers are ubiquitous in the modern urban fabric; they are typically drab and purely utilitarian.  In Japan, municipalities take pride in the this ordinary piece of the landscape and convert them into extraordinary works of art that reflect the local people, place and culture. 


Tags: book review, landscape, art, urban, culture, place, EastAsia.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:00 PM

This is a great take on art and the ways of celebrating Japan with touches of personal findings and ideas. These manhole covers are cheery and reflect a piece of Japan that not only tell stories, but embrace history.

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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.


This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   


Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 3:20 PM

This interactive map discusses the current disputes between the islands and why the land is being disputed. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 11:40 AM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

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Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System?

Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"After growing by leaps and bounds for more than three decades, China’s economic growth has come to a halt, falling from around 12 percent in the second quarter of 2006 to 7.6 percent in the second quarter of 2012. Export-dependent manufacturing sector has been hard hit. The June HSBC Flash Purchasing Managers Index hit a seven-month low of 48.1, down from a final reading of 48.4 in May, the eighth consecutive month that the index has been below 50—the contraction threshold. Is this just a temporary pause, caused by a prolonged slow-down in the world economy or something more serious?"

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Graham Mulligan's comment, March 14, 2013 9:32 AM
I think the flag icon needs to be changed.
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Scientists observe 'tragic experiment' of tsunami debris

Scientists observe 'tragic experiment' of tsunami debris | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Jeff Larson has seen just about everything wash up on the shores of Santa Cruz: bottles, toys, shotgun shells, busted surfboards and fishing floats that looked like they had bobbed across the Pacific.

 

This is just another long-term 'after-shock' of the tsunami that devasted Japan over 1 year ago. 

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Terraced Rice Fields

Terraced Rice Fields | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See a photo of an aerial view of a terraced rice field in China and download free wallpaper from National Geographic.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This image shows is one of the more beautiful cultural landscapes that shows the great extent of agricultural  modifications of the environment.  National Geographic's photo of the day is a great source for images that start class discussions and can enliven class content. You may download a high resolution version of the image here

 

Tags: National Geographic, agriculture, landscape, China.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:42 PM

Rice fields are pretty neat. You need to be one meticulous person to be able to build these fields. The shapes of them and the erosion that occurs to the oldest ones form interesting patterns. These ariel shots are worthwhile looking at and seeing where exactly the rice is growing is cool.

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East Asia's maritime disputes

East Asia's maritime disputes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A race for energy resources makes unresolved territorial disputes more dangerous in both North-East and South-East Asia

Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, Japan, East Asia.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the geopolitical conflicts in the East Pacific have their roots in the territorial disputes over islands that at first glance seem as if they wouldn't be worth the trouble.  However, since the the UNCLOS agreement gives countries 200 nautical miles off their coasts to be an Exclusive Economic Zone, that greatly enhanced the strategic value of controlling these islands. 

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Catherine Shabo's curator insight, April 21, 2013 6:32 PM

There is a big lesson to be learned from this map and what it means. No territory on this earth is completely not valuable. Specifically ones with long coast lines and natural resources. This shows how Geography comes into play with economic profit. Now, if this division is not working for the East Pacific then the ideal thing would be to divide it equally. But, that never works does it..

megan b clement's curator insight, October 12, 2013 9:43 PM

" Asia is willing to go to war with small islands in order to gain full control and rights of the ocean borders. China is very assertive and aggressive. They even go to the extreme as to use boats to hit Vietnamese and Phillipino ships to show that the ocean is theirs. It is all because countries or islands with a coastline are to have rights over their land and 200 nautical miles as well. It is just becoming a problem because how do you evenly distribute or differentiate who's is who's."

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:48 PM

I couldn't view this content. Its "cookies" were unable to read my computer.

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Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister

Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Taro Aso says he would refuse end-of-life care and would 'feel bad' knowing treatment was paid for by government
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's no secret that Japan's population is aging and can not replace itself.  Since it is not a destination country for migrants, this is going to have serious economic ramifications as the percentage of the Japanese population over 60 is expected to rise above 40% over the course of this next generation.  Given the harsh statements by the new Japanese finance minister, it's a huge political concern (although a difficult one mention in campaigns).  Some have already questioned Japan's ability to survive this demographic implosion as adult diapers are now a bigger moneymaker in Japan than children's diapers.

 

Tags: Japan, declining population, economic, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asia.

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Greg Hill's curator insight, January 29, 2013 10:17 PM

Tell us how you really feel

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 7:30 AM

Its clear that Japan is overpopulating. People are living long lives in a big country like Japan and people just keep reproducing. The Japense  minister in my opion is very wrong here. A minister should never wish deaths upon his people.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 8:11 AM

As populations age and the younger generations have less children the burden of government to provide care for the elderly becomes a big issue.  In countries where the government pays for their health care this will only become a bigger issue.  When the needs of the old and the needs of the young become a conflict what is a country to do?  These issues will only increase as the birth rates of developed countries declines.  

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Korea and the Yellow Sea

Korea and the Yellow Sea | Geography Education | Scoop.it
While city lights at night serve as a good proxy for population density, North Korea provides a dark exception.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This image is appears to be a regional inset of the classic Earth at Night composite image however this nighttime remote sensing image was taken from Sept. 2012.  The Earth at Night image is typically used in classrooms to discuss what this actually means for human geography (Population density?  Development? Consumption? Where? How come?).  However, this particular portion of the global image focused on the Korean Peninsula highlights two other specific issues:

  1. the impact of a totalitarian state can actually be seen from space as South Korea has a per captia income level 17 times higher than that of North Korea. 
  2. the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) can be seen in the Yellow Sea as fishing vessels form a line approximately 200 nautical miles off the coast of South Korea.     


Tagseconomic, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, territoriality, states, unit 4 political, remote sensing.

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Dean Haakenson's curator insight, January 4, 2013 1:30 PM

Amazing photo! Population density is a good issue but also political geography and economic geography as well.

Ju Hui Judy Han's curator insight, January 6, 2013 9:22 PM

This cliché image of "North Korea in the dark" reinforces preconceived ideas about the "totalitarian" state and how terrible life must be without electricity. Well, one aspect of this political geography is the effect of US-backed sanctions against North Korea and the severe ecological and energy crisis under which it has struggled for the last two decades. Just as electricity is not simply a "natural" resource, neither is energe consumption nor shortage. 

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, January 8, 2013 10:14 AM

This image is appears to be a regional inset of the classic Earth at Night composite image however this nighttime remote sensing image was taken from Sept. 2012.  The Earth at Night image is typically used in classrooms to discuss what this actually means for human geography (Population density?  Development? Consumption? Where? How come?).  However, this particular portion of the global image focused on the Korean Peninsula highlights two other specific issues:

the impact of a totalitarian state can actually be seen from space as South Korea has a per captia income level 17 times higher than that of North Korea.  the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) can be seen in the Yellow Sea as fishing vessels form a line approximately 200 nautical miles off the coast of South Korea.     


Tags:  economic, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, territoriality, states, unit 4 political, remote sensing.

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Hong Kong and China: Growing apart?

Hong Kong and China: Growing apart? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The BBC's John Simpson reports from Hong Kong, where the former colony's increasing independent-mindedness is worrying Beijing.
Seth Dixon's insight:

When the rule of Hong Kong transferred from the UK to China in 1997, the Chinese government was careful to ease the fears of those in Hong Kong that they would not have their political and economic systems turned upside down.  "One country, two systems" was the famous slogan to sum up the policy that some felt would simply delay the inevitable.  Today, many of the youth in Hong Kong are demonstrating against what they feel are pressures to do away with their unique status and are bringing back the old colonial flag.  This is not asking for a return to British rule, but a symbolic reference to their distinct history from the rest of mainland China.  Today only 16.6% of Hong Kong residents identify themselves as Chinese, which is the lowest it's ever been since 1997.

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Steven Sutantro's curator insight, December 20, 2012 6:06 PM

Interesting facts...that's the interdependence concept of Geography..

Bill Chen's comment, December 22, 2012 6:20 AM
http://www.myairmaxpascher.com/
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China's 'Mountain-Moving' Project

A promotional video shows planned development of a state-level development zone by government of Lanzhou, a provincial capital in China's arid northwest...


The Lanzhou province is lightly populated mainly due to it's semi-arid climate and rugged topography.  The goal is make a 500 square mile area (currently with 100,000 people) into a city with over 1 million people by 2030.  To make this new metropolis, developers are planning to literally remove mountains to create a more 'ideal' urban environment.  This makes some of the most ambitious environmental modification projects seem tame.  For more read, the accompanying article from the Guardian.  


Questions to Ponder: What potential environmental impacts come from this scale of modification?  How will this massive influx of the population impact the region?  Could this type of project happen in other part of the world? 


Tags: environment, urban ecology, planning, environment modify, China.

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 11, 2012 8:51 PM
The developer is claiming this will be "protective development." I am not sure if I buy that. They are moving mountains- which means everything that comes with that, wildlife, trees, etc... And they are building an airport and an oil refinery (amongst other things).. Urbanizing can be great for the economy- but at what cost.
Elizabeth Allen's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:51 PM

The developer is claiming this will be "protective development." I am not sure if I buy that.  They are moving mountains- which means everything that comes with that, wildlife, trees, etc...  And they are building an airport and an oil refinery (amongst other things)..  Urbanizing can be great for the economy- but at what cost.   Elizabeth Allen

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Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute

Chinese passport map causes diplomatic dispute | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Experts warn that China's apparent claims to other territories could have a long-term impact on relations with its neighbours...


Seth Dixon's insight:


Many people assume oftentimes that a map merely reflects reality.  In this passport map, China is flexing it's regional muscles, trying to reinforce their territorial claims as legitimate.  Not surprisingly, their neighbors with competing claims are angered, calling this map diplomatically "unacceptable."  Some look at this map and dismiss it as a glorified watermark.  What you think the sub-text to this map is?  You can find another article on this topic in the Washington Post


Tags: cartography, China, borders.

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China profile

China profile | Geography Education | Scoop.it

China is simply to important to ignore and this profile is a good primer for students unfamiliar with the East Asian country to get caught up to speed. 

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Emily Gaulke's comment, May 3, 2013 9:23 AM
China has a huge population but is has a horrible life style. It
Emily Gaulke's comment, May 3, 2013 9:25 AM
China has a huge population but it has a horrible life style. It's really bad when people have to protest for human rights. Even though their economy has boosted their pollution problems are unexceptable.
Joel Roberts's comment, May 3, 2013 11:37 AM
China's huge population growth isn't necessarily such a good thing because most of the new population is males because parents want males so they can have more workers after they get married but its harder to get married because there is less and less girls in China's population.
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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.


I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."


Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.

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Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 10:29 AM
The request video is not available ...
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The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original.  This first video is the original, which in a few short months received well ove...


The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon. 


Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?


Tags: popular culture, video, diffusion, globalization, culture, place, technology, unit 3 culture

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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 11:27 AM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.

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Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s curator insight, August 3, 2013 1:59 PM

Various historical essays on population have captured the attention of many who may have otherwise tended to be indifferent to what had been obvious to the authors all along.

Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s comment, August 3, 2013 2:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 7:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

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Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational

Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The final 32 generators went into operation this week, making it the world's largest hydropower project, pictured, built on the Yangtze River in China."  This photo gallery has a tremendous video at the end that displays vividly the raw power that moves the turbines.  Economically, what are the benefits? Environmentally, what are the costs?    

 


Via John Foden
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