Geography Education
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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.


Why do commentators, like Chicken Little, treat this worldwide trend as a disaster, even collective suicide? It could be because declines in fertility rates stir anxieties about power: national, military and economic, as well as sexual. In reality, slower population growth creates enormous possibilities for human flourishing. In an era of irreversible climate change and the lingering threat from nuclear weapons, it is simply not the case that population equals power, as so many leaders have believed throughout history. Lower fertility isn’t entirely a function of rising prosperity and secularism; it is nearly universal.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This op-ed from the New York Times provides excellent material for discussing demographic issues, especially regarding declining populations.  Many countries do fear the demographic uncertainty and are actively encouraging pro-natalist policies (with salacious ads such as Singapore's National Night and a Travel agency's 'Do it for Denmark' campaign).  The author of this article though, seeks to quell those fears.    


Tag: declining populations, population, demographic transition model.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 11:52 AM

This op-ed from the New York Times provides excellent material for discussing demographic issues, especially regarding declining populations.  Many countries do fear the demographic uncertainty and are actively encouraging pro-natalist policies (with salacious ads such as Singapore's National Night and a Travel agency's 'Do it for Denmark' campaign).  The author of this article though, seeks to quell those fears.  

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 9, 6:44 PM

Challenges the ideas about the impacts of declining birth rates across the world. Contains interesting graphs of changing Fertility rates from 1950 for the highest and lowest GDP nations. Relevant to Population Geography. 

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European word translator

European word translator | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Translate any word from English to more than 30 other European languages, on a map
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredible resource to visualize the linguistic similarities between European languages all on one interactive map.  Just type in a word or phrase as it will translate it for you and place the results on the map.  I just found this, but I think it still belongs on my list of favorite resources.   


Questions to Ponder: Do you see any regions forming?  How does language impact the diffusion of people, ideas and goods?  Hoe do you think these languages diffused?   


Tags: language, culture, English diffusion.

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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 10:23 PM

This is a fantastic resource for seeing how words have changed according to geography. Type a word into the box and see it translated directly on to a map in more than 30 languages. Great for teaching kids about regions of language, or asking how they think a certain country came to use a certain word. 

Mick D Kirkov's curator insight, April 11, 3:43 AM

Haha, hehe, hihi, or Ho-ho-ho! Maybe even huhuhuy!

Helen Rowling's curator insight, April 17, 4:57 PM

English; Toursim; Geography

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If the Earth Stood Still

If the Earth Stood Still | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The following is not a futuristic scenario. It is not science fiction. It is a demonstration of the results of an extremely unlikely, yet intellectually fascinating query: What would happen if the earth stopped spinning?  ArcGIS was used to perform complex raster analysis and volumetric computations and generate maps that visualize these results.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love a good "what if?" question and this one (including the GIS model-based analysis) is fascinating. 

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, April 4, 4:49 PM

What a fascinating question, answered as a visualisation: What would happen if the earth stopped spinning? ArcGIS was used to perform complex raster analysis and volumetric computations and generate maps that visualise the results.

Christian Allié's curator insight, April 5, 4:40 AM

........""""""""""""""""""""""......

 

[ ... ]

 

......... 

Most scientists agree that the solar day (related to the speed of rotation) is continuously getting longer. This minimal increase of the day length is due mainly to the oceanic tidal friction. When the estimated rate of the slowdown was projected back to past geologic eons, it showed that the length of a day was several hours shorter than today.

Consequently, during the Devonian period (400 million years ago), the earth rotated about 40 more times during one revolution around the sun than it does now. Because the continents have drifted significantly since that time, it is difficult to make estimates of the land versus ocean outlines for that era. However, we can be certain that—with a faster spinning speed in the past—the equatorial bulge of oceanic water was much larger then than it is today. Similarly, the ellipsoidal flattening of the earth was also more significant.

The influence of the rate of the earth's rotation has a dominant effect on the geometry of the globe, in terms of the globe's overall shape as well as the outline of the global ocean. The earth's physical relief is only a secondary factor controlling the delineation of oceans. The slowdown of earth's rotation will continue for 4 billion years—as long as we can imagine. The slowdown infinitesimally—but steadily—changes the globe's geometry and makes it dynamic. The net result of these dynamic adjustments is that the earth is slowly becoming more and more like a sphere. However, it will take billions of years before the earth stops spinning, and the gravitational equipotential creates a mean sea level that is a perfect sphere.

 

About the Author

Witold Fraczek is a longtime employee of Esri who currently works in the Application Prototype Lab. He received his doctorate in the application of GIS in forestry from Agricultural University and master's degrees in hydrology from the University of Warsaw, Poland, and remote sensing from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 10:25 PM

How interesting! The detailed GIS is fascinating and although an unlikely scenario, is great for discussion and deeper thought. You could discuss with students how the world would cope or what sort of device could start it spinning again...?

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The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. and CNN Money's list of the worst sprawl and a discussion of it's impacts.  


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:35 PM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

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L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 6:57 PM

Urban  Dynamics

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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  

Seth Dixon's insight:

I woke up this morning to news of a large earthquake in Chile (security camera video footage).  IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night.  


Tags: visualization, disasters, physical, Chile.

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dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2:02 AM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 5, 10:52 AM

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 


View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:39 PM

Mijnbouw en aardverschuivingen, een goede combinatie ...... 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 11:48 AM

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 

 

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.

 

Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   

El Futuro deWaukesha's curator insight, April 18, 12:03 AM

Working on an Inquiry of recent natural disasters with first grader.  

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Coast to Coast: Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons

Coast to Coast:  Baseball Hall of Fame Geography Lessons | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The history of baseball reflects the story of expansion in the United States. New cities have emerged and modern stadiums have been built as a growing population fueled the popularity of our National Pastime. The result is an extensive network of baseball teams at every level - from the major leagues to the little leagues - that represent the communities and environments in which they play. Everything from jersey colors, names, and symbols to the foods served at ballparks reflects the local landscape and culture of baseball teams. A simple game that began with a bat and ball is now a comprehensive case study of how people and geography are interrelated.

 
All of the lessons and activities have been prepared to accompany "Geography: Baseball Coast to Coast." You will find that the curriculum is organized into three levels: Level 1 for elementary school students, Level 2 for middle school students, and Level 3 for high school students.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Thanks to the NCGE and the Baseball Hall of Fame for working together to bring us these great resources...play ball!!  On a local note, what baseball team is the most popular in your area?  Is there a geography to fan support? 

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The Rice Process's curator insight, March 31, 10:59 AM

Love these lessons. Reminds me of the Gridiron Geography unit I did with my junior high classes. The lessons connected geographical  regions, economy, history or culture themes to NFL football teams.  

Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 4, 10:07 PM

Thanks to the NCGE and the Baseball Hall of Fame for working together to bring us these great resources...play ball!!  On a local note, what baseball team is the most popular in your area?  Is there a geography to fan support? 

Marianne Hart's curator insight, Today, 11:28 AM

 Local teams, stadium name, mascot, Great addition to #MysterySkype

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Place and Opinions

Place and Opinions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some deeply held opinions that individuals hold are rooted in the cultural and regional influences (even if they feel that they are being purely objective).  Sports fans though, are rarely objective and are often swayed by those opinions that they hear the most, which often come for those closest to us.  While we are on the subject of basketball and geography, you've got to try Population Bracketology, which challenges your knowledge on the sizes of Metropolitan Statistic Areas and state population.     


Tags: fun, sport, place.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 31, 7:11 PM

Sports and regions

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What makes geography grads the most employable?

What makes geography grads the most employable? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We asked our experts why they thought geography and psychology graduates were found to be least likely to be unemployed
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some studies have shown that geography graduates are some of the least likely to be unemployed...what makes geography majors so employable?  The mix of skills without one career track makes geography majors able to land on their feet in a shifting economic landscape.  If you wondering about job possibilities for geography majors, here is a list designed to answer the question, "what can I do with a geography degree?"  More than you might think. 

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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 4:04 AM

Why study geography ? This is why

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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 4:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 10:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 5:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

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Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I've conducted research in Mexico City, and am endlessly fascinated but this urban amalgamation.  The city is so extensive that there are numerous morphological patterns that can be seen in the city, including the 12 listed in the article.  


Tags: Mexico, density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: Why is Australia's population so highly clustered?  What is it about the yellow (and white) areas that explain this pattern?  How does this map of rainfall add to our understanding? What other layers of information do we need to properly contextualize this information?   


Just for fun, here is a Buzzfeed list that highlights the dangerous biogeography of Australia.  Maybe this is why people aren't living in the yellow region.   


Tags: AustraliaOceania, population, density.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 30, 10:10 AM

What could explain the density of the white area? What is it about the yellow area that explains the lack of population?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 13, 7:32 AM

While the rainfall map offers a lot of explanation for why Australia's population is concentrated in areas of significant rainfall, it is not a complete picture. There could be a number of other factors contributing to the clustered population of Australia. Northern Australia receives significant rainfall, but is sparsely populated so there must be other reasons. A map with more topography would help as it could show mountainous barriers which would hinder expansion or major rivers on which civilizations thrive. Similarly, a climatic map could reveal areas which are tropical and less conducive to large populations of a more temperate climate.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 20, 10:07 PM

Few people populate most of Australia’s land, which appears yellow on this map. The 2% who live in this large area must be self-sufficient, as I am sure there are not many stores one can buy goods from. Most of the yellow area is dry land and receives small amounts rainfall. Many dangerous snakes and spiders live in the yellow area, as well. By looking at the rainfall map, one can understand why many people live on the outer edges of Australia. 

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7 Steps You Can Take To Address Street Harassment

7 Steps You Can Take To Address Street Harassment | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I used to think that street harassment was so entrenched in our culture and unchangeable. All I could do to address it was to cope - walk fast; avoid eye contact; pretend to be on the phone. But I got tired of feeling powerless and decided to respond to it and change the culture that allows it to continue.
Seth Dixon's insight:

People experience place and public spaces in very distinct ways--gender plays a crucial role in how we socially navigate in and through space.  This article about how women can address street harassment goes well with this additional article that tackles the problems with a society that normalizes street harassment


Tagsspace, gender, place.

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A tour of the British Isles in accents

Got the audio here - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01slnp5 The person doing the voice is Andrew Jack who is a dialect coach.


Tags: language, culture, English, UK.

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Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, April 6, 4:33 AM

He's really quite good, and the seamless change of dialect is quite impressive!

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 6, 11:32 AM

The diversity of the English language is amazing.  Even in the "motherland" it changes from location to location...aye bay goom.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 10:19 PM

This is a really interesting video for understanding regional dialect differences!

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Aerospace manufacturing takes off in South

Aerospace manufacturing takes off in South | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Region attracting some of the biggest names in aviation, including Boeing and Airbus.


The South is home to auto giants Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen and Nissan Motor Co. It is increasingly attracting some of the biggest names in aviation, including Boeing Co. in South Carolina, Airbus in Alabama, Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. in Georgia and GE Aviation in North Carolina.

Aerospace companies are taking a cue from the auto industry and moving their manufacturing operations to Southern states. The region's lower costs, generous state incentive packages and right-to-work laws that make it hard for unions to organize are motivating these companies to choose the South.

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Mr. Gresham's curator insight, April 10, 7:59 AM

Here is an example of what was covered last unit.  As your reading think about what forces pulled those companies to the south.

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American Makeover: SPRAWLANTA

"American Makeover is a web series on new urbanism, the antidote to sprawl."

Seth Dixon's insight:

American Makeover only produced two segments in the series, but they are excellent examples that show the planning ethos of new urbanism.  In this episode, they lay out the argument against urban sprawl.  In Episode 2, they show the ideas that guided the planning of Seaside, Florida.  For a map of some of my favorite place based videos, which will include these, click here.     


tags: suburbs, transportation, planning, sprawlurban, land use, unit 7 cities

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Cécile Chevallier-Antoni's curator insight, April 5, 5:20 AM

Atlanta:  sprawl> 90 % pop habite dans les comtés avoisinants. Actifs parcourent en moyenne 66 miles par jour. Sans limite?

2009: Forbes Atlanta is "the most toxic city in the US".

ex quartier planifié  ( écoquartier?)>1.5 miles de la ville> Glenwood, 

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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.


Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, narcotics, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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Thats stunning...
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Love 'em or hate 'em - Britain's rocky relationship with the EU

Love 'em or hate 'em - Britain's rocky relationship with the EU | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The United Kingdom's relationship with the EU - or, in political parlance, 'Europe' - has long been one of the most divisive, emotive issues in British politics."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The beginnings of the European Union are rooted in the aftermath of WW II, with Europe exhausted from war many politicians wanted to unite European countries in a way that would make war with each other impossible.  The United Kingdom, though has had a complicated with the EU, sometimes (and for certain issues) wanting greater European integration to strengthen their regional position and at other times have resisted regional collaboration for fear of losing national autonomy.  This is very over-generalized, but this BBC article gives a nice historical perspective on the rocky relationship of between the two.  


Tags: Europe, supranationalism, currency, economichistorical, sovereignty, UK.

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New York Public Library Puts 20,000 Hi-Res Maps Online

New York Public Library Puts 20,000 Hi-Res Maps Online | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When I was a kid, my father brought home from I know not where an enormous collection of National Geographic magazines spanning the years 1917 to 1985. I found, tucked in almost every issue, one of the magazine’s gorgeous maps—of the Moon, St. Petersburg, the Himalayas, Eastern Europe’s ever-shifting boundaries. I became a cartography enthusiast and geographical sponge, poring over them for years just for the sheer enjoyment of it, a pleasure that remains with me today.  Whether you’re like me and simply love the imaginative exercise of tracing a map’s lines and contours and absorbing information, or you love to do that and you get paid for it, you’ll find innumerable ways to spend your time on the new Open Access Maps project at the New York Public Library."

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Yellowstone National Park rattled by largest earthquake in 34 years

Yellowstone National Park rattled by largest earthquake in 34 years | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Yellowstone National Park, which sits atop one of the world's largest super-volcanoes, was struck on Sunday by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, the biggest recorded there since February 1980, but no damage or injuries were immediately reported."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The amazing geothermal activity in Yellowstone National park annually brings thousands of tourists to the region.  The reason why these geysers, hot springs and fumaroles are there is because of the what is just below the surface.  Watch a video (the 2 minute version or a 44 minute version) to see why this natural wonder is also a major geologic threat for earthquake and volcanic activity, which explains the reasons for this weekend's earthquake.   Not to be an alarmist, but this is why some fear another major eruption soon.

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CSINowedu's curator insight, March 31, 9:23 AM

Yellowstone National Park, which sits atop one of the world's largest super-volcanoes, was struck on Sunday by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, the biggest recorded there since February 1980, but no damage or injuries were immediately reported.

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Changing Earth

Changing Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video from National Geographic goes nicely with some of my recent posts about the dramatic changes that can be seen as some cities have exploded on the international scene.  The changes in metropolitan areas are dramatically presenting using satellite imagery in this great teaching video. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 7:29 PM

A great illustation of the changes to the environment as a result of increasing technology and population. Plays for 1minute 30.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 7:34 PM

A short but fascinating illustration of the rapid changes to areas of teh Earth, observed by astronauts since 2000. Plays for 1 minute 30.  

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 4, 7:46 AM
This is a great resource for some of our science classes. It is an interesting presentation of the changes that we are making over time.
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Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile?

Will Ethiopian dam dry up the Nile? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (known as Gerd) is now about 30% complete.  Once completed, in three years, it will be Africa's largest hydropower dam, standing some 170m (558ft) tall."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Located near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps), Ethiopia plans to dam the Blue Nile before the water heads to Sudan and eventually into Egypt.  As stated in this BBC article (with a nice 1-minute video clip), Egypt and Sudan currently get the majority of the Nile's waters because of colonial-era treaties and Egypt is opposed to Ethiopia's plan, fearing their water supply with be threatened. 


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, development. environment, water, environment modify, energy, borders, political.


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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, April 1, 12:02 PM

How will people who have survived for eons living of the abundance of the river waters survive and adjust to a loss of the source of life? They are being forced to become agrarian. The introduction of GMO growing is part of that process. This is not a solution. We need to find healthy solutions.

Those who benefit from the dams and resulting hydroelectric power should be accountable (directly or indirectly) to the people who are displaced by these project. Putting them in confined areas away from their natural habitats is NOT the answer.

Just look what happened to the American Indians. Their livelihoods, their homes, their ancestry, their heritage, their health, their souls, their pride and their sense of community were destroyed. It may take a revolution to avoid that happening here, a Food rEvolution.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 1, 3:06 PM

In an area fraught with political instability, non state actors, and rebel groups all too willing to fight for power and the wealth that comes from it - it will be interesting to see how the conflicts shift over time as this dam gets closer to completion. Will Egypt attempt to sabotage it or will they take a more diplomatic approach and try to work with the Ethiopian government diplomatically again?  Perhaps Egypt will whisper in to the ear of Sudan or the various "rebel" groups in the region, considering diplomatic means have apparently failed so far. With Sudan's use of the Blue River also going to be affected by Ethiopia's damming, it will be interesting to see if a cooperation between Egypt and Sudan occurs. Perhaps Ethiopia would like to see a deeper conflict between Sudan and South Sudan, keeping their affected neighbor off balance.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 16, 6:47 PM

It is extremely difficult to divide a river. The Ethiopians will benefit immensely from this project but the Egyptians could lose everything if the Nile dries up. This is going to be a difficult problem to solve.

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Circles of Latitude Craft

"Hands-on worksheet to play and review the circles of latitude from the Wise Nest."  

Seth Dixon's insight:

I originally found this hands-on activity on Maps 101 wanted to make my own.   This is a fun way to make latitude more meaningful and memorable.  All the documents you need to recreate this, and to have your students make their own are available here


TagsfunartK12.

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In Memoriam: Harm de Blij

Harm de Blij describes his book, "Why Geography Matters."
Seth Dixon's insight:

As many of you have heard, Harm de Blij (probably the author of one of your textbooks ) passed away early this week.  He was a tireless advocate for geography and geography education.  He understood that without geographic expertise, our foreign policy would suffer and our collective ability to thrive in an era of globalization would be curtailed.  I was always captivated by his presentations and was continually astounded by the depth and breadth of his knowledge. Here is what the NCGE and AAG said about his life work.   Rest in peace.   

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Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 27, 9:38 AM

As United States schools struggled to remain focused on the potential values of geography and GIS in education programs, de Blij was just plowing along making new pathways in this field.  

One of the most important qualities of a geographer is he/she traditionally thinks about other things that most traditional scholars never conceptualize.  

The notion of space and time as features that bear specific rules and associations with disease, disease order, the tendency for one disease to follow another but not vice versa in the evolution of populations, are features that medicine failed to get a complete grasp of throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  

We ignored the gestault of health and disease patterns, by focusing too much on the minutia, the microcosm and its bacteria or viruses and how human cells and tissues react to these when they become pathogens.

The international relationships that exist, which de Blij emphasized in many of his textbooks, are core features today as we try to better understand health as a global issue.  The isolationism initiated in the 1930s, and the notion that our understanding of science is better, no longer guides those who take the most important pathways to discovery in academia.  

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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Often we treat countries as solid areas and miss many regional patterns; in part because we view global data sets that are at that scale. 

Questions to ponder: what regional patterns do you see?  What accounts for these patterns?  What do you think other countries would look like with data at this scale?    


Tagsmapping, regions, censusdevelopment, USA.

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steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 3:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 6:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 9:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.