Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Learn about your Food

Learn about your Food | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Many consumers don't know much about the production of their food.  Is your food Genetically modified?  Organically produced?  Learn how to know.   

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Evolution of DC's Metrorail

Evolution of DC's Metrorail | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Metro is debuting its "Rush Plus" service today. In honor of this, the latest step in Metro's 34-year growth and evo­lution, here is an updated version of our popular animation showing the history of Metrorail service. 

 

This is a nice, simple interactive feature showing the expansion of the transportation network in the Washington D.C. area. 

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Unexpected Consequences

Unexpected Consequences | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Climate change has numerous casualities: the melting of the Arctic Sea ice is one such environment nightmare that's a result of global warming (don't worry Texans, you can just call it a "freak heat wave" or an "inexplicable anomaly").   But like all global processes, not all places are impacted equally.  Even in an economic recession, some find fortune while the majority flounder.  Same is true with the melting of the Artic; the melting might potentially opening up the fabled Northwest Passage and create new, seasonal shipping lanes.  Who would benefit from this?  Who would suffer?  To see a short video on this, see: http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/09/melting-arctic-sea-ice-and-shipping-routes  

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The Geographic Impacts of Fathers

The Geographic Impacts of Fathers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The social-science evidence is in: though it may benefit the adults involved, the dissolution of intact two-parent families is harmful to large numbers of children."

 

On this Father's Day, I'm thinking about the sociological importance of fathers and my gratitude for my father (an educator who instilled in me the desire to teach).  Although this article is quite dated and was politically charged with a controversial title at the time, "Dan Quayle was Right," many of the main points still hold today.  The article points to solid social science evidence as to the importance of fathers within society.  Conversely, fatherlessness also has major (negative) impacts society as well.  

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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 13, 2012 9:51 PM
Culture and location may play a greater role in this issue than the article suggest as urbanized societies tend to high a higher divorce rate than rural ones. Education, living standard and opportunity are not distributed equally in this country (or anywhere else) and to make the argument that increased broken families and the loaded “lack of values” theory is the main cause behind raising social problems can be a bit misleading, as it excludes environmental factors. However, I do agree that fathers can have a positive impact on their childs development.
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California's Deadlocked Delta

California's Deadlocked Delta | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What did the Delta look like 200 years ago? See an interactive map of the historical habitat and present day landscape, as well as the old photos, maps and journals used by historical ecologists to answer that question.

 

This interactive module has over 20 different maps and perspectives to show both the physical and human geography of a particular environment.  As the delta's ecosystem has been failing, the importance of understanding the interconnections between people, places and our environment becomes all the more critical.

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:02 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the concept of human geography vs physical geography in that its maps and interactive models provide a basis for the difference between the two subfields of geography.

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Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations

Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations | Geography Education | Scoop.it
With the country also known as Burma taking steps toward democracy and respect for human rights, Coke is returning after a 60-year absence. What are the two nations where it still won't be doing business?

 

Globalization has made many companies and products ubiquitious throughout the world.  We take their presence as a matter of course, a sign that the largest brands are in essentially every country in the world--but not all.  Until recently Coca Cola was not in three markets, all for political reasons.  Now that Burma is becoming more democratic, Coca-Cola will bring their product to all countries of South East Asia.  Any guesses on the 2 countries that still don't have Coke?

 

UPDATED CORRECTION: Thanks to the great people at About.com 's geography page, I was informed that there are more than just the initially listed two countries (North Korea and Cuba) not within the Coke universe (such as Somalia and East Timor to name a few).  For more on this see: http://geography.about.com/b/2012/06/15/coca-cola-in-every-country-but-three-no.htm

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:03 AM

Coke is another product that is a worldwide phenomenon. People love their soda (even if its terrible for you). People that migrate from country to country bring with them unique items such as Coke, that the foreigners don't know about. This is how different countries come to pick up on other countries foods and customs.

Cyrena & Chloe's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:43 PM

GEOGRAPHY: North Korea, although one of the smallest nations in the world, is still arguably the most defiant. They're completely cut-off from the outside world, and they've displayed this once again by not selling Coke in their borders. Being a classic American drink, Coca-Cola is likely viewed as an enemy to North Korea, judging by their hatred of America and its citizens. They're one of only two countries in the world not to sell Coke, and this just goes to show that even though they're physically connected to us, they are isolated from the world.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 7:06 AM

Coca Colas return to Myanmar signals a change in the history of that country. The recent democratic reforms in the nation have made it a nation that can be attractive to major international cooperation's.  Coke will likely be the first of many international cooperation's that seeks to return to this market. Often, democratic reforms are initiated  in the hope that it will make the nation attractive to outside businesses.

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Scientists Tackle The Geography Of Nature Vs. Nurture In Maps Of U.K.

Scientists Tackle The Geography Of Nature Vs. Nurture In Maps Of U.K. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Genes and the environment both shape health and development. But their effects are not always equal. Researchers in the U.K. say they've mapped hotspots where nature has a stronger influence, and others where nurture dominates.

 

All people are a combination of their genes as well as the environment (a mix of 'nature' and 'nurture').  A recent study of over 5,000 twins throughout the UK saw regional concentrations where it appears that environmental factors had a greater than normal influence (centered around London).  I'm still scratching my head wondering what to make of this data, but this is a compelling project.     

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The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst

The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hint: India is last among the G20 and the United States didn't crack the top five in the latest survey to reflect poorly on the situation of American women.

 

A poll of 370 gender experts yielded some interesting results that reflect the local cultural, economic, political and developmental geographies.  Beyond using the lists of best and worst countries (since the rankings are still based on rather subjective criteria), students can come up with their most important factors in evaluating gender equity and evaluate the countries based on their own evaluations. 

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Container City

Channel 5 - Behind closed Doors Series on Container City at Trinity Buoy Wharf...

 

On my daily commute, I drive by a colorful container building in Providence, RI.  In terms of it's spatial configuration and aesthetic statement within the urban landscape, I found it fascinating.  After doing some more research, I began to appreciate this as a form of sustainable housing that 1) costs less than traditional structures, 2) can be built MUCH quicker that standard buildings and 3) has the potential to be an effective recycling method.  For more on 'Container Cities,' see: http://sustainablecitiescollective.com/kaidbenfield/40875/shipping-container-cities-bring-creative-funky-approach-green-construction

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Spatial Analysis of the NBA Finals

Spatial Analysis of the NBA Finals | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Navigate court maps and view analysis of every shot taken over the ’11-'12 season for the Miami Heat and Oklahoma City Thunder.

 

Who said geography has nothing to do with sports?!?  While there are many cultural and economic impacts on sport preference and prevalence, let's discuss the geography of the hardwood and a spatial analysis of the shot selections between the two teams.  Clearly 'place matters' to many NBA players as their success on the court depends on finding their preferred spots within the flow of offense.     

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AP Human Geography test results

On Twitter, College Board’s Head of AP testing Trevor Packer discussed some preliminary results about the AP Human Geography test.  Packer also noted in other tweets that: "AP Human Geography students showed stronger learning this year than in the past--smaller percentage of 1s, higher percentages of 4s/5s."

"College professors say: AP Human Geo students who score 1s need more critical interpretation of maps and cause/effect focus in essays." 

"In terms of really distinguishing which AP Human Geo students deserve college credit, Question 3 was the most effective."

 

2012 AP Human Geography scores:

(These may shift slightly as late exams are scored)

 

12.6%=5

19.5%=4

20.4%=3

17.9%=2

29.6%=1

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Evolution in a Big City

Using newts, coyotes and mice, Jason Munshi-South shows how animals develop genetic differences in evolution, even within an urban city. "Evolution in a Big ...

 

Humanity has obviously had an enormous impact on the environment and our sprawling metropolitan areas are the primary example.  However, we often fail to think about how urbanization is impacting other species inhabiting the planet.  Our cities have essentially created 'islands' of livable habitat for many species and the same evolutionary processes of divergence and extinction are now seen in our urban areas.  Island biogeography is becoming increasingly important as we continue to fracture and fragment the environment within which other species can live.  This incredible Ted Talk can be seen (and flipped) on the new TED-ED site at: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/evolution-in-a-big-city

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Earth As Art : Pick Your Favorites!

Earth As Art : Pick Your Favorites! | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The USGS is celebrating 40 years of the LANDSAT

Program by having a competition to select the top 5 "Earth as Art" images from the more than 120 scenes from their curated collection.  All readers can select 5 images on the USGS website and the poll closes on July 6, 2012 (The image above is from Coahuila, Mexico).

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 6, 2012 8:11 PM
Really shows the natural beauty of the world through our technology.
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The Geography of Obesity: Global Patterns

A great geography teacher worth following on twitter!  This particular tweet is a great example of the collaborative exchange of resources possible on social media. 

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The World is all about Money

The World is all about Money | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A world map used by Erik Penser Bankaktiebolag to visualize economic markets. The map contains approximately 3,000 coins and every continent is built out of its countries’ currencies. Used in various medias during 2009."  If you look closely you will notice that the coins are from the region that they are cartographically representing.  To see more by this artist, visit: http://www.penser.se/

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Climate Change is Simple

David Roberts is staff writer at Grist.org. In "Climate Change is Simple" he describes the causes and effects of climate change in blunt, plain terms. On Apr...

 

This is video is designed to explain climate change in 15 minutes.  If you would like see the slides presented, you can see them at: http://grist.org/climate-change/climate-change-is-simple-we-do-something-or-were-screwed/

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Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality

Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Wealthy cities seem to have it all. Expansive, well-manicured parks. Fine dining. Renowned orchestras and theaters. More trees. Wait, trees?

 

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (for a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning, see: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204607002174 ). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? For more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees (and to share your own), see: http://persquaremile.com/2012/05/24/income-inequality-seen-from-space/

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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:00 AM
this short article explains the evidence supporting tree to rich cities ratio. it goes to show that if I'm going to pay big bucks for location I would want the scenery to be beautiful hands down. they mention the per capita increase to tree ratio and how its only a dollar that influences such a high quantity of trees in city. bottom line is that it makes sense for the more trees in wealthier neighborhoods of the city because when your in the heart of the city you tend to see quantity of quality of homes and being jammed packed into small square footage doesn't leave much room for nature. but go just outside the city where the real estate is high and more spacious and you will find more trees the further and further from the center.
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:04 AM
Like a previous article it explains how if viewing a neighborhood with lush grass and huge yards with landscaped grounds it is associated with big money. People pay top dollar for houses that have huge back yards and privacy of trees. You would not see yards like this is the city though so these neighborhoods on the outskirts of the citylines.
Shaun Scallan's curator insight, January 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Interesting the value, in the broadest sense, that trees can bring in an urban setting

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Real World Math

Real World Math | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Real World Math: Using Google Earth in the Math Curriculum."   Back to my interdisciplinary approach to strengthening geographic education, image hearing that there is a Math teacher at your school using this, wouldn't you want to be a part of it?  Too often knowledge is taught within disciplinary silos; students need opportunities to make real world connections between the disciplines to breath life into how they are taught.  This site reminds me of http://www.googlelittrips.org/ which allows real world geography to be a part of literature/English classes.    

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The Politics of Culture

An NPR team begins a series of reports from North Africa, where last year's revolutions have Tunisia, Libya and Egypt writing new rules for their changing societies.

 

The Arab Spring has reworked the political landscape in Tunisia; this podcast looks at the cultural changes that have also taken place because of the political shifts.  How are culture and politics interconnected?   

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Africa Takes Off

Africa Takes Off | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Ask this question: Which region of the world currently is the home to 6 of the 10 fastest growing economies?  Most people (myself included) would be surprised to hear that the region is sub-Saharan Africa.  While Sub-Saharan Africa is still the least economically developed region with some very significant challenges, too often Africa is only taught as a region of problems and negative patterns.  

 

Trade between Africa and the rest of the world has tripled in the last decade.  Since 2005, Africa is officially receiving more private foreign investment than official aid.  With many counties "skipping the landline phase" and going straight to cell phone technologies, the rapid acceleration of technology means that they Africa's economic infrastructure has the potential to increase quickly.      

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Landscapes of Oil

Landscapes of Oil | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Socks is a online magazine about Media, Art, Architecture, Cities, Design, Technology.

 

Our society is obviously heavily dependent on oil.  Yet we often don't see the environmental impacts of our collective oil consumption on the landscape because the negative impacts have been spatially separated away from oil consumers.  This is an excellent compilation of photos by Edward Burtynsky that makes the connection between oil consumption and changes to both the physical and cultural landscapes explicit.  For more images by this artist, see: http://www.edwardburtynsky.com/ ;

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Early World Maps

Early World Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

I typically would not link to a Wikipedia article, but this one is not only well crafted, and represents an academic collaborative work in its own right.  This a fabulous cartographic gallery that explores the history of geographical thought through the ages (as archived in the earliest maps).  Enjoy the maps, and even more, the intellectual context that this article provides for each of these images.      

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Scientists observe 'tragic experiment' of tsunami debris

Scientists observe 'tragic experiment' of tsunami debris | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Jeff Larson has seen just about everything wash up on the shores of Santa Cruz: bottles, toys, shotgun shells, busted surfboards and fishing floats that looked like they had bobbed across the Pacific.

 

This is just another long-term 'after-shock' of the tsunami that devasted Japan over 1 year ago. 

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Vector-Based Maps in iOS 6

Vector-Based Maps in iOS 6 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Apple announced today that it's revamping the Maps application on iOS devices—iPhone, iPad, iPod touch—introducing a lot of showy new features like...

 

Earlier this week I posted an article that was skeptical about Apple's foray into online mapping that essentially said that Apple could not replace Google.  This article focuses on the differences in Apples mapping strategy--primarily shifting digital mapping for raster based data to vector data.  This is a perfect example to show GIS students the relevance of how data is stored. 

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Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study

Ethnicity and Religion: A Case Study | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a nation of 230 million people, 700 languages and some 300 ethnicities, ethnic Chinese are one of Indonesia’s historic minorities.

 

Religion and ethnicity are often connected, but not always.  This case study of such a group, the Chinese Muslims of Indonesia, provide an interesting glimpse into the economic, historic and political patterns of these cultural groups that are parts of communal identities.  

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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:40 AM

Pie charts to display ethnicity, religion, and population across the world,

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:26 PM

This is a very unusual circumstance.  The Chinese were originally immigrants to Indonesia.  Then they were regarded as higher on the social status than native Indonesians under Dutch rule.  And eventually when Indonesia got its independence, assimilation was forced on the Chinese.  This is a clear case of racism and religion-forcing at its finest.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 7:17 AM

Indonesia is often identified as the largest Muslim nation in the world. That identification, is only telling a portion of the true Indonesian story. Indonesia is one of the most diverse nations on the planet. The nation has over 700 languages, and has some 300 different ethnicities. Among those may ethnicities, are ethnic Chinese Muslims. Each ethnicity possesses its own cultural identity. In the years following the Second World War, a vast program of persecution was directed at the ethnic Chinese. Many felt, that it was impossible for ethnic Chinese and Indonesians to coexist. After a long struggle, by 2000 ethnic Chinese rights were reinstated.