Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Archeology from Space

TED Talks In this short talk, TED Fellow Sarah Parcak introduces the field of "space archeology" -- using satellite images to search for clues to the lost sites of past civilizations.


The uses of geospatial technologies is NOT limited to studying geography, but it is the bedrock of many research projects that involve spatial thinking (as demonstrated in this TED talk).  Geographic principles and geographers can be very important  members of interdisciplinary teams.


Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, TED, MiddleEast, historical

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Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, January 15, 2014 11:13 PM

This sounds really intruging to me; I have heard of astroarchiology before in the aplication of finding undiscovered large objects (cities, towns sttlements) by using satellites to map deviations in teh earths surface accurately enough to distingush structures like a building foundation. I just find this sort of thing fascinating. I am still in awe that this dort of thing is possible.

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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.

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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation

The Role of Place in Discovery and Innovation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Kauffman Foundation's Samuel Arbesman on his new book, The Half-Life of Facts.


This is an interview, Samuel Arbesman,the author of The Half-Life of Facts explains how population density and place matter in forming a creative economic workforce. Urban centers act as drivers of innovation and advancements and attract the more ambitious and daring workers. Additionally, this map on the expansion of the printing press (discussed in the interview) is also a great map to show how technological innovations can spur cultural diffusion.


Tags: technology, diffusion, urban, labor, migration, book review.

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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | Geography Education | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.


The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.

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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 PM

This article was great in that it left me with some great visuals and details on each of the models. For me, it's hard to remember each one of the models but this article really allowed me to compare each one and read about each one all in one place. The layout of the article was also nice and I think that it was just a great overall reminder of the models.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:56 PM

This article teaches you mainly about the Burgess and Hoyt Model. It compares the two, and it gives you detailed information on lots of the urbanization terms.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about how geographers drew up cities and made models of how cities were drawn up. It teaches you how they thought back then, and how urbanization has evolved from then to now.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 5:26 PM
unit 7
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AIDS/HIV

AIDS/HIV | Geography Education | Scoop.it

AIDS is a global issue, but clearly this impacts Sub-Saharan Africa far more than any other region. 


Tags: Africa, medical, infographic, development.

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 11, 2014 2:59 PM

If AIDS is obviously a bigger problem in SUb-Saharan Africa i would hope that, that is where we would send the most help and further educate people about safe sex and how to prevent from spreading AIDS.

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Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.

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jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

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Remind 101

Remind 101 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A safe way for teachers to text message students and keep in touch with parents.


I've tried numerous methods including Facebook groups and Twitter hashtags as ways to digitally connect with my students through emerging social media platforms.  Every method seems to have a few privacy or accessibility issues and this is no expection.  However, for this one, I think that the benefits outweigh the negatives and it has much greater privacy control than most.  I haven't tried this out yet, but next semester I hope to use this free way to text message all my students (and/or parents) without the privacy issues of sharing cell phone numbers or getting them to sign up for a new social media platform.  


Tags: training, edtech, socialmedia, GeographyEducation.

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mkauls's comment, October 14, 2012 1:03 PM
I use this with all my classes and I would recommend it! It's simple and very easy to use and teach parents/students to sign up.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:47 PM

Great way to maintain communication. 

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 2, 2013 9:25 AM

This is an interesting possible way to connect with students or organizational members.

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Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border

Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This lesson plan was specifically designed with Arizona examples and aligned to the Arizona state standards, but it be easily adapted.  I saw a presentation based on this lesson at the NCGE conference as was incredibly impressed.  Also, you'll note that like this one, there are many other lesson plans freely available on the Arizona Geographic Alliance website.  


Tags: K12, borders, political, landscape, migration, unit 4 political.

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oyndrila's comment, October 14, 2012 11:40 AM
I found very useful resources on the website. Thank you for sharing it.
Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an important lesson, especially for those who actually live in Arizona/Mexico and have seen the border itself. Learning about the Arizona/Mexican border is important and shouldn't be left solely to teaching it only in those areas. The maps included in the lesson plan are efficient and could be used in the high school setting.

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Map as Art

Map as Art | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are many amazing examples of artists who turn to cartography and geography for inspiration. Whether through the lens of a camera, paint, ...


This series of cartographically-inspired art works changes how we look at maps.  Some of these artists also make us think of places that are on the Earth as explicitly "mappable" features.  I think the Google Maps push-pin in the city center is my favorite.  Which do you prefer? 


Tags: art, mapping, place, cartography

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GeoMapGames's curator insight, March 4, 2014 12:47 AM

Amazing map art! I like Google Maps push-pin in the city center :)
Which do you prefer?  #geomapgames

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Obama's Secret Weapon In South

Obama's Secret Weapon In South | Geography Education | Scoop.it
States in the Deep South traditionally vote Republican in every presidential election. However, a string of "blue" counties curve through Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia.


Question to ponder: How does the physical geography of a region impact the human geography of a place?  Using this example, does the environment completely determine the cultural outcomes of the region?  To what extent does one impact the other?


Tags: physical, political, environment, unit 4 political.

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.

 

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today.   

2013 update: The paper plant is now officially closed  

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:31 PM

This mill on Lake Biakal was created in the soviet era. This was created and made a increasing well place to work with the promise of a bright future for its workers. Instead when it comes to the post soviet era its a failing community. Not because of the workers but because of the era that they live in. The age of environmentalists. because of this the mill and its workers are suffering. Many of the people that had moved there to work in the mill in the 60's with a promise of a bright future. However today the people who originally moved there and the descendents are paying the price for the soviet promise. If the mill were to forever close then the people of the area would basically have no life and future. They wouldnt even have enough money to move out of look for jobs.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:28 PM

Seeing this video and the lack of human development in this small town is astounding. They are destroying a lake and the environment about them, they do not care though. Unfortunately, they have to not care about the environment, they are so desperate for work to make money to live and support themselves and family, that they are willing to do what it takes to keep their jobs at the mill. The workers and citizens of the area know about the consequences of the pollution, they know it needs to be taken care of, but with the depravity they have, they have to. They are faced with a situation no one want to be in... work and destroy the environment so they have money to live, or be without life necessities. 

Louis Helyes's curator insight, October 10, 2016 2:12 PM

This video talks about a paper mill in Russia. It is saying that environmentalists are pressuring the mill to close down due to the environmental impact that the paper mill is doing to the surrounding area, such as killing the crops, trees and plants. It also talks about them losing their jobs because they may be unable to find other jobs in their area.

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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.


I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."


Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.

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Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 1:29 PM
The request video is not available ...
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Digital Topographic Maps

Digital Topographic Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Home page of USGS Topographic Maps...

Seth Dixon's insight:

The last paper editions of USGS topographic maps came out in 1973 and 1992.  If you are waiting for the next print edition, you'll be waiting a long time.  Like so many other agencies with information distribution, the USGS topo maps have gone digital.  In 2001 the USGS announced the production of a current, seamless digital National Map.  You can still quadrangle chunks of the National map and download them for free as PDFs (with geospatial extensions for measuring).   You can search for aerial imagery here.


Tags: mapping, cartography, geospatial.

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UN High Commissioner for Refugees

UN High Commissioner for Refugees | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.


Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 


Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, January 22, 2013 12:20 AM

Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.

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Spanish Crisis Revives Calls For Catalan Secession

Spain's dismal economy has residents of the country's richest region, Catalonia, wondering if they'd be better off going it alone. With their own language and distinct culture, Catalans have long pushed for independence from Spain.


This podcast merges several geographic strands together as economic turmoil in the southern portion of the Euro Zone has fanned the flames of cultural resentment and put discussions for Catalonian independence on the agenda for local politicians. 


Questions to ponder: Will this internal devolution cause greater disintegration in the European Union or Spain?  Would an independent Catalan be a wise move for the Catalonians?  How would their independence impact Spain?    


Tags: political, autonomy, economic, Europe, devolution, sovereignty, unit 4 political.

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United States MapMaker Kit

United States MapMaker Kit | Geography Education | Scoop.it
MapMaker Kit. Download, print, and assemble maps of the United States in a variety of sizes. The mega map occupies a large wall, or can be used on the floor.


Have you every wanted to create a giant map but aren't sure if you can logistically pull it off?  The National Geographic's MapMaker kit is just that, a kit for you to create wall maps from a standard printer and tile them together.  The assembly itself is a great spatial thinking and fun exercise for students (and there are large world maps as well). 


Tags: NationalGeographic, cartography, mapping, K12.

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Arezza Network's comment, October 19, 2012 9:20 AM
#Geography is key to shaping the #culture of a community
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World Tattoo

World Tattoo | Geography Education | Scoop.it

I'm not a "tattoo guy," but this is amazing.  On this map, you've got to earn the ink by traveling to the country. 


Tags: images, art, cartography.

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Daily Life in Afghanistan

Daily Life in Afghanistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We tend to look at Afghanistan through the lens of conflict, with good reason. Deaths of American forces recently reached 2000 in the 11 years since US involvement in the country began.


Yes, Afghanistan is a war-ravaged country; but it is also a place that families call home and where children play.  This photo essay is a nice glimpse into ordinary lives in Central Asia.


Tags: Afghanistan, images, culture, Central Asia

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:04 PM

In this photo essay you will see many pictures of the normal lives of afghan people. There is one of two young boys riding a donkey and one about a boxing wearing his best suit after hi won a fight the last night. He wanted to show his friends how happy he felt.

 

Good post.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 3, 2015 1:09 PM

It appears that Afghanistan has a poor economy. It's lifestyle is definitely different from the way we live in the United States. The buildings are not as well-developed as the buildings in New York City and Chicago. Also, Afghanistan seems to lack cleanliness which allows diseases to spread throughout the country, and perhaps throughout small parts of other countries that border it.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:06 PM

Daily life in Kabul is a daily struggle as one of the most impoverished places in the world. They suffer from a lack of infrastructure to the lack of medicine in the hospitals. Many of the invasions that have occued have weakened a already weak country. That has led to many deaths and much fighting on the area. These images show many of the struggles that pepople go through on a daily basis. This was not just the people being in poverty but with the wars and stuff that have happened there has to led them to be even more worse off. 

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Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial

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Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 9:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 3:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.

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Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | Geography Education | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:04 PM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, September 30, 2014 4:04 PM

Remember this is based on a % of the total population, and not total #. Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list? 

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Geo-Literacy

Geo-Literacy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance seeks to promote geo-literacy here in the Ocean State.  So what is geo-literacy? The National Geographic Society’s Educational team...


As the Alliance Coordinator for the state of Rhode Island, I organized  these three videos (two from National Geographic) and some pictures to provide a basis for understanding what geo-literacy is and why it is important for society and within the workforce.  In the spirit of sharing, I thought I'd share these links beyond the borders of Rhode Island. 

 

Tags: GeographyEducation, NationalGeographic, geo-inspiration, RhodeIsland.

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Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade

Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade | Geography Education | Scoop.it
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — South American engineers are trying to tackle one of the continent's greatest natural challenges: the towering Andes mountain chain that creates a costly physical barrier for...


At the NCGE conference, noted author Harm De Blij mentioned a daring project that would link Eastern South America with the Pacific as engineers were planning to tunnel under the Andes mountains.  Here is a link to an article on this intermodal transportation project that would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic.  Government officials in both Argentina and Brazil have described the  project as a matter of "national interest."  


Tags: transportation, LatinAmerica, globalization, industry, economic, development, unit 6 industry.

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Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 12:54 PM

This is a great idea for a region that has the need to travel so much through such a tough area. Even if it will cost a lot of money to accomplish, in the long run it will save more than it costs to build.  This could change so much, and really boost their economies. Not only would it speed up shipping time and lower shipping costs, but it would allow more shipping to be done which means more business throughout the entire year as opposed to the situation now with snow getting in the way. Not only would it effect that aspect of the economy but it would also produce jobs for the time of the work being done, which is never a bad thing.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:19 AM

If this project can be accomplished, it would truly be one of the greatest engineering feats in human history. To build a railroad tunnel through the Andes mountains seems impossible, but in all likelihood with the right amount of funding, it can be done. The tunnel would have great economic benefits for both Brazil and Argentina. Goods from both countries could be shipped in both directions with out any issues. The larger world would also benefit from the train tunnel. It is estimated that the tunnel would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic. The entire global trading market would benefit from this development.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:44 PM
Doing something such as this is a brilliant move in engineering. Making a tunnel through the Andes will connect countries together, make shipping much easier and doing so may cut the cost of goods being shipped and received. Just like the Panama Canal increased the cargo freight lining industry for shipping, this will also increase an industry for railways,.
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Russians are leaving the country in droves

Russians are leaving the country in droves | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over a bottle of vodka and a traditional Russian salad of pickles, sausage and potatoes tossed in mayonnaise, a group of friends raised their glasses and wished Igor Irtenyev and his family a happy journey to Israel.


My regional class has been learning about Russia this week and when I first started teaching a few years ago, I would teach that Russia had a population of 145 million.  Today it is 141 million and part of that is due to migrants leaving a country that they see as lacking in economic opportunities and political freedoms (another part of the story is that birth rates plummeted after the collapse of the Soviet Union in what demographers have called the "Russian Cross").  In the last few years the population appears to have stabilized, but there are still many who do not see a vibrant future from themselves within Russia.  


Tags: Russia, migration, Demographics, immigration, unit 2 population.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:44 PM

In the last 10 years about 1.25 million russians have emigrated out of Russia, but the way they do it is interesting. When they leave they dont sell their houses, or aparments, or cars they simply lock their doors and quietly slip away to the airports at night. The reasons for leaving are different thought, some are leaving because the prime minister is expected to return while some are leaving because of the awful econonmy. Either way the massive amounts of emigration is leading to a higher death rate then birth rate overall. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:23 AM

This article from a couple years ago is about Russian emigration. A large number of Russians were leaving the country for better economic opportunity. Some cite the overbearing rule of Putin, but the pay in other countries is just better than what Russia can offer. This was particularly the case for the more educated, another instance of "brain drain" hurting a nation which is already in trouble.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:00 PM

Migration occurs for many reasons. People move from country to country every day. Leaving Russia was this families choice and moving to Israel can have an impact on them greater than if they were to stay in Russia.

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Selecting a Map Projection

Selecting a Map Projection | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Video. Cartographers at National Geographic discuss how they select an appropriate map projection for the September 2012 magazine map supplement.


There is no one perfect map projection that fits all circumstances and situations. Think of a situation in which this map projection would be an ideal way to represent the Earth and in another situation that same projection would give you an incredibly limited perspective. 


Tags: cartography, K12, geospatial, NationalGeographic, water

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The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A professor criticizes the "culture of quantification," (in the journal cultural geographies) arguing that we don't do enough with the data we collect.  If all we do is count (or attempt to count the homeless), does that help them in any way or change the realities that lead to homelessness?  Are we counting them just to give us the numbers to receive credit that may help other programs but not help the homeless?  Is data for data's sake of any value?


UPDATE: Another geographer noted some other issues of homelessness on the website facebook page, specifically in regard to this map of homelessness: "A problem associated with this map is that while the numbers get smaller, it raises the question: where did they go? (answer: Hollywood, after an emphasis on policing pushed them out)...this could be tied in to a discussion about map scale."


Tags: statistics, class, census, socioeconomic, housing, poverty.


Via Allison Anthony
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