Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Drought and Famine

In which John Green teaches you a little bit about drought, which is a natural weather phenomenon, and famine, which is almost always the result of human activity. Throughout human history, when food shortages strike humanity, there was food around. There was just a failure to connect those people with the food that would keep them alive. There are a lot of reasons that food distribution breaks down, and John is going to teach you about them in the context of the late-19th century famines that struck British India.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Famine is exacerbated by natural factors such as drought, but those only stress the system, they rarely cause the actual starvation.  The real failure is that the political/economic systems created by governments and how they handle stains in the food production/distribution systems.  Widespread famines are very rare in democracies and are much more prevalent in authoritarian regimes.  Many of the recent examples have come from collectivation strategies that governments have implemented (currently Venezuela, but historically the Soviet Union and China).  The Choices program has some good resources about teaching current events with the famines today.

 

Tags: food, povertyhistoricalcolonialism, economic, political, governance, agriculture, crash course

 

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Battle Cry for the Bodega

Battle Cry for the Bodega | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Why the chainification of the corner store is a bigger deal than losing book stores and record stores combined.

 

The term Bodega originally referred to a neighborhood grocery in a mostly Spanish-speaking part of town, it has come to be used (in my experience) to cover just about any independently owned small grocer in the city. The fear is that the corporate behemoth (7-Eleven) will destroy the neighborhood bodega, a New York institution of long standing. The quintessential bodega is a beloved part of the fabric of the city.  The outcry has been loudest in the East Village, a neighborhood that despite gentrification still prides itself on its countercultural attitude and grimy authenticity.

Seth Dixon's insight:

When we discuss food deserts, we typically think about places that lack supermarkets.  In an urban context, the places that often fill this void are the bodegas.  In some major cities, these are going away as chains like 7-Eleven want to expand their reach and squeeze out these independent grocers. However you view this issue, “There’s no denying that the texture of the city would be flattened if the idiosyncratic bodega became an endangered species.”

 

Tags: food, urban, povertyplace, socioeconomic, food desert.

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'Crimetown' podcasts on Providence No. 1 on iTunes charts

'Crimetown' podcasts on Providence No. 1 on iTunes charts | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Providence, once the heart of the New England mafia, was chosen for the first season. The approximately 17 to 20 episodes will follow the patterns of corruption in Rhode Island up through the banking crisis of RISDIC, the impeachment of a Supreme Court justice, and City Hall corruption in Operation Plunder Dome."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is not just a fascinating local story of my new hometown; this is a riveting portrayal of the urban social geographies of organized crime, corruption, and the cosa nostra.  With only three episode to date, they with entertain and inform listeners with delving into the inner working of the mob (and just a heads up--the language will be crass and actual crimes will be discussed--don't say I didn't warn you).  To be honest, of course season one of Crimetown dad to been about Providence, and it is all the more compelling knowing the neighborhoods that are being shaped in this historical portrayal of Rhode Island.    

 

Tagsurban, crime, Rhode Island, neighborhood, socioeconomic, poverty, podcast.

 

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Alexander peters's curator insight, December 13, 2016 12:24 PM
This was about the tv show that is about the new england mafia. I have watched the show
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India’s campaign to change cultural practices

India’s campaign to change cultural practices | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Television commercials and billboards now carry a message that strike at the heart of the Indian contradiction of being the world’s fastest-growing major economy and also where relieving oneself in the open is the norm in most villages. Research shows that one of the reasons for the stubborn social practice is the centuries-old caste system, in which cleaning human waste was a job reserved only for the lowest caste. Having a toilet at home is still considered unclean by many villagers. They regard it cleaner to go to the open farms, which can cause water-borne diseases, the second leading cause of death of Indian children younger than 5."

Seth Dixon's insight:

An aggressive new campaign is ridiculing those who are no longer poor but continue to defecate in the open--even this UNICEF campaign (some language and low-brow humor, so use your own discretion) is working hard to change the cultural patterns and practices surrounding defecation and sanitation.  There are more cellphones than toilets in India and the lack of adequate sanitation and toilets is serious enough that that Prime Minister Narendra Modi has made building toilets a national priority.  Comics are using their platform to bring this issue of uneven development to light. 54% of people in India do not have regular access to toilets and these comedians are using their platform to not only get some laughs, but to advocate for social change. 

 

Tagsdevelopment, poverty, India.

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Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying.

Africa’s Charcoal Economy Is Cooking. The Trees Are Paying. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Madagascar, the booming charcoal business is contributing to deforestation and may exacerbate the effects of global warming.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Deforestation does not happen in a vacuum--it occurs in an economic, political, and historical context.  Rural Africans have less access to high value commodities and converting forests into charcoal is one of the few options (similar to the issue in Haiti).  The short-term economic gain for a few individuals leads to long-term environmental problems such as soil erosion, flooding, and habitat destruction for many species.  

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, poverty, development, economic, labor, Madagascar, erosionAfrica, resourcespolitical ecology.

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Launceston College Geography's curator insight, February 1, 10:44 PM

deforestation

Launceston College Geography's curator insight, June 13, 9:51 PM

Deforestation drivers

Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 9, 9:41 AM
If we know that furthering education and economic opportunities will help alleviate the problems present here, why aren't we as a planet seeing that they are implemented? 
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How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks

How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see one every day and never give give it a second thought. But in Yangon, Myanmar in 2013, an ATM was a small miracle. For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one from the U.S. or Europe did business there."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We often assume that one form of technology, a system, institute should work equally well where ever it is.  But the nuances of cultural geography mediate how societies interact with technological innovations, and as demonstrated in this Planet Money podcast, "People in Myanmar (Burma) were reluctant to use ATMs because they didn't trust the banks. They weren't sure that the machines would actually give them their money."  

 

Tags: Burma, Southeast Asia, poverty, development, economicpodcast.

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Haiti: From Recovery to Sustainable Development

"Since the 2010 earthquake, Haiti has successfully pulled through the humanitarian recovery phase and seen significant socioeconomic gains. Yet as Haiti moves toward long-term, sustainable development, the country faces significant challenges. The political system remains fragile, sustainable jobs are scarce, and the environment is still as vulnerable now as it was then."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this is primarily a promotional campaign for the UNDP's efforts in Haiti, it nicely contextualizes the problems that Haiti faces before discussing how to improve the situation.  Some keys for the future include: 

  • Governance and Rule of Law
  • Recovery and Poverty Reduction
  • Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Environmental Management
  • Medical Outbreak Management  

 

Tagsdisasters, Haiti, NGOspoverty, development, video.

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Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 2016 10:19 PM
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The Ever-Expanding Slums

"Slums lack:

  • Permanent housing
  • Sufficient space
  • Clean water
  • Sanitation
  • Personal safety
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is a slum?  Why do so many people around the world live in slums?  What are the largest slums in the world?  These are the questions that this video seeks to answer as the TestTube team tackles one of the more pressing issues of confronting urban areas in the developing world.   

 

Tagspoverty, squatter settlements, development.

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Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 2016 6:29 AM
Another GREAT resource to show to Geography students! 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 2, 2016 12:29 AM

The liveability of urban slums in the developing world makes an interesting study linking access to services and facilities, community identity, social connectedness, environmental quality and safety. 

 

Follow an introduction to slums using this video clip and 8.11 with the following resources that investigate the impact of rapid urbanisation on the liveability of cities.

 

Slums are a consequence of urbanisation studied in more depth  in Changing Places (Stage 9) - consequences of urbanisation. Limit the study of slums to liveability issues in stage 4 or an introduction to factors influencing liveability. 

 

GeoWorld 7 NSW

Chapter 7: Liveability:Measurement and environmental factors 

7.6 Access to shelter

Chapter 8 Urban, rural and remote places

8.6 An urban world

8.7 Why go to town?

8.8 Large cities attract people

8.10 Skyscrapers and slums

8.11 Kibera slums and flying toilets

Geothink people live in cities - Figure 8.14.3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 13, 11:07 AM
unit 7
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The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools

The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The crop failure in Ireland affected only the potato—during the worst famine years, other food production was robust. Michael Pollan notes in The Botany of Desire, 'Ireland’s was surely the biggest experiment in monoculture ever attempted and surely the most convincing proof of its folly.' But if only this one variety of potato, the Lumper, failed, and other crops thrived, why did people starve?  Thomas Gallagher points out in Paddy’s Lament, that during the first winter of famine, 1846-47, as perhaps 400,000 Irish peasants starved, landlords exported 17 million pounds sterling worth of grain, cattle, pigs, flour, eggs, and poultry—food that could have prevented those deaths. Throughout the famine, as Gallagher notes, there was an abundance of food produced in Ireland, yet the landlords exported it to markets abroad."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

TagsIreland, foodeconomiccolonialism, poverty.

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Brien Shanahan's curator insight, March 24, 2016 10:04 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 2016 7:32 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

Bob Zavitz's curator insight, March 28, 2016 7:05 PM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

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National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans | Geography Education | Scoop.it

DEMOGRAPHICS OF HOMELESS VETERANS

12% of the homeless adult population are veterans
20% of the male homeless population are veterans
68% reside in principal cities
51% of individual homeless veterans have disabilities
50% have serious mental illness
70% have substance abuse problems

Seth Dixon's insight:

Things to remember on Veteran's Day...homelessness is a major problem for the urban geography of most American cities and veterans are disproportionately affected (including Providence, RI).  Let's remember them on the 364 other days of the year too. 


Tags: urban, poverty, military.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 2015 8:58 PM

Things to remember on Veteran's Day...homelessness is a major problem for the urban geography of most American cities and veterans are disproportionately affected (including Providence, RI).  Let's remember them on the 364 other days of the year too. 


Tags: urban, poverty, military.

God Is.'s curator insight, November 15, 2015 11:30 AM

How about taking care of our own FIRST?

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 16, 2015 1:27 PM

Being a Marine myself I think of it everyday already. Its sad that at  a young age of 17 with parent consent and a high school diploma or 18 on up a person male or female can enlist into the military and put their life on the line regardless of wartime or not and somehow or someway find themselves homeless or worse homeless with substance abuse and mental illness all at the same time. Keep in mind this was not the issue before enlisting. This, if I am not mistaken as always been a problem for all the years we had a military. Marine Corp birthday 10 November 1776.

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10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project

10 Poverty in Africa Facts - The Borgen Project | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Here are 10 facts about poverty in Africa that demonstrate the widespread consequences of poverty that affect education, health, food consumption and more.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Poverty happens all over the world, in the United States, in Africa, South America, you name a region and there is poverty in that area.  There are many myths about poverty though, and myths about regions where poverty defines the region in many people's eyes.   African economies are on the rise, but there is still many struggles ahead.  


TagsAfrica, development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:48 PM

Poverty happens all over the world, in the United States, in Africa, South America, you name a region and there is poverty in that area.  There are many myths about poverty though, and myths about regions where poverty defines the region in many people's eyes.   African economies are on the rise, but there is still many struggles ahead.  

 

Tags: Africa, development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:15 PM

The issues outlined by Western media concerning Africa are serious problems that the continent will continue to face over the course of the next century. However, Western media has a tendency to focus only on the troubles faced by Africa rather than its successes. We grow up hearing of starving children in Ethiopia, government instability, and the need for the West to donate and help their "less fortunate" kin. Africa has, in fact, made serious strives in terms of economic development, with serious foreign investment- particularly from the Chinese- and the growth of Africa's own industrial base contributing to rapid improvements in standards of living and infrastructure. The West continues to paint the picture of Africa that fits the narrative it has painted for the past century- an underdeveloped continent reliant on Western aid. However, despite the issues outlined in this article remaining serious issues, it cannot be denied that Africa has enjoyed serious progress over the past two decades. The political instability that plagued the continent for much of the second half of the 20th century has diminished, and will only continue to improve. Africa is turning into a major economic force on the world stage, no matter what the media is telling us- it will be interesting to see how much longer this false image of Africa can continue to be portrayed to the public.

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Poverty (1964): Cincinnati Slums

TELEVISION DOCUMENTARY: Examines the slum areas of Cincinnati, Ohio, and provides extensive views of substandard housing in various parts of the city. Describes the problems of the uneducated and unemployed who cannot escape from poverty, but finds a "ray of hope" in a young school child. Offers no solution for eliminating urban poverty, but states that everyone "must try."
Seth Dixon's insight:

While some of the technological presentation and the intellectual framework are certainly outdated, it is a glimpse into how America thought about poverty during the LBJ administration and the famous "War on Poverty."


Tagsurban, economic, Cincinnati, historical, poverty, socioeconomic.

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Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It

Giving the Poor Easy Access to Healthy Food Doesn’t Mean They’ll Buy It | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Those living in areas without fresh produce tend not to eat well. But just putting in a supermarket is not a panacea, it turns out.


Tags: food distributionfoodeconomic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 10, 2015 9:27 AM

Stigmergy at work.

Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, May 10, 2015 3:55 PM

It is difficult to change the junk food and convenience food culture in one generation. 

Robert Slone's curator insight, May 19, 2015 9:04 AM

This was really surprising , it is amazing how education effects every area of our lives .

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Venezuela Is Starving

Venezuela Is Starving | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Once Latin America’s richest country, Venezuela can no longer feed its people, hobbled by the nationalization of farms as well as price and currency controls. The resulting hunger and malnutrition are an unfolding tragedy.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Widespread famines are very rare in democracies and are much more prevalent in authoritarian regimes.  This is because food production is but a small part of a larger picture; the system of food production and distribution in Venezuela has been decimated by the nationalization of private farms.  Individual farmers can’t make a profit in the new political economy and consequently are going to stop producing for the market.  This vicious cycle is political in nature more so than in is agricultural. 

 

Tags: food, poverty, Venezuela, South America, economic, political, governance, agriculture, food production.

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Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 1:27 PM
Seth Dixon's insight: Widespread famines are very rare in democracies and are much more prevalent in authoritarian regimes. This is because food production is but a small part of a larger picture; the system of food production and distribution in Venezuela has been decimated by the nationalization of private farms. Individual farmers can’t make a profit in the new political economy and consequently are going to stop producing for the market. This vicious cycle is political in nature more so than in is agricultural.
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Death toll doubles in Ethiopia garbage dump collapse

Death toll doubles in Ethiopia garbage dump collapse | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The death toll from a collapse at a landfill outside Ethiopia’s capital has risen sharply to 113, an Addis Ababa city official said Wednesday, as the country began three days of mourning for victims who were mostly women and children. Saturday’s collapse of a mountain of garbage buried makeshift mud-and-stick homes inside the Koshe landfill on the outskirts of the capital."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some geographies are uncomfortable to discuss because they expose some of the social and spatial inequalities that we wish weren't part of economic geographies.

 

Questions to Ponder: Why did this happen?  Why were so many people in the landfill?  

 

Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, development, urbanpoverty, squatter.

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11 Facts About Food Deserts

11 Facts About Food Deserts | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Food insecurity has a high correlation with increased diabetes rates. In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of areas with access to grocery stores."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Food deserts are places where residents have limited access to healthy food.  Here is a great map from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture that shows low-income census tract that are more than one mile from supermarkets and rural areas that are more than 10 miles from the nearest supermarket.  Esri has also produced a food desert map that shows where unserved people (farther than 1 mile in urban/10 miles in rural) live in poverty.  For a household with a private automobile, distance to a supermarket isn’t that crucial an issue, but without an automobile, this lack of healthy food available becomes a significant challenge for residents that live in this neighborhood.  

 

Tags: food, urban, povertyplace, socioeconomic, food desert.

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Harley Bass's curator insight, January 10, 3:11 PM

This article is connected to human geography by agriculture. We talk and learn about agriculture every day in the class room. I feel like this article is a eye opener to the naive mind of people who do not live in or around food desert areas.

Hailey Austin's curator insight, January 10, 3:22 PM
This is connected to my class because its dealing with agriculture and how they have limited crops. So most of there food is manufactured and unhealthy. I think that food deserts should either be shut down or given better food options.In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of an area with access to a grocery store.
Mitchell Tasso's curator insight, January 11, 8:57 PM

This article/scoop is very intriguing and cool to read. It goes along with the topic of agriculture and describes the 11 facts that it bares about food deserts whether those facts are good or bad. Overall, I liked this scoop because of the 11 facts and the detail that was provided with them.

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The Best News You Don’t Know

The Best News You Don’t Know | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I’ve covered massacres in South Sudan, concentration camps in Myanmar and widespread stunting in India, but it’s also important to acknowledge the backdrop of global progress. Otherwise, the public may perceive poverty as hopeless and see no point in carrying on the fight — at just the point when we’re making the most rapid gains ever recorded.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world is winning the war on extreme poverty, but most Americans think that poverty is getting worse. Doom and gloom can dominate media coverage because a horrific tragedy gets better rating than slow incremental improvements.  The general public is often ignorant of the measurable improvements going on in the world today.  No, the world isn’t perfect, but it is getting better. 

 

Tags: mediapoverty, development, economic, perspective.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 6, 2016 9:36 PM
This article provides a positive look at the advances made in global development measures.
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The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile

The Subtle Design Features That Make Cities Feel More Hostile | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Think your city doesn’t like you? You’re right.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Geography explores more than just what countries control a certain territory and what landforms are there.  Geography explores the spatial manifestations of power and how place is crafted to fit a particular vision.  Homeless people are essentially always 'out of place.'  These articles from the Society Pages, Atlas Obscura, the Atlantic and this one from the Guardian share similar things: that urban planners actively design places that will discourage loitering, skate boarding, and homelessness, which are all undesirable to local businesses.  This gallery shows various defensive architectural tactics to make certain people feel 'out of place.'  Just to show that not all urban designs are anti-homeless, this bench is one that is designed to help the homeless (and here is an ingenious plan to curb public urination).  

    

Tags: urbanplanning, architecture, landscape, place, poverty.

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Cutting Haiti's Forests

The major environmental problem facing Haiti's biodiversity is explained, including video of tree-cutting within a national park.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Deforestation does not happen in a vacuum--it occurs in an economic, political, and historical context.  Having successfully staged a slave revolution against France in 1806, they were ostracized from the global community (since the powers that be did not want to see slave rebellions or colonial uprising elsewhere) and were forced to look within for their own energy resources.  The nation's forests were (and still are) converted into charcoal, leading to long-term environmental problems such as soil erosion, flooding, and habitat destruction for many species.  All of this increased  increased Haiti's disaster vulnerability in the earthquake of 2010.     

 

Tags: Haiti, biogeography, environmentecology, video, poverty, development, economic, labor.

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chao pan's curator insight, June 15, 6:50 PM

a good video to show how human activity negatively impacts the ecosystem. I will use this video in phase three

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Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything

In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease
Seth Dixon's insight:

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal on these ships, but they aren't designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.

 

Tags: BangladeshNational Geographic, South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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I Have Been to the Mountaintop

Audio http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkivebeentothemountaintop.htm
Seth Dixon's insight:

On April 4, 1968 Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.   Shared above is his last speech given the day before he died in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

Tags: historical, race, poverty

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 4, 2016 8:59 PM

On April 4, 1968 Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.   Shared above is his last speech given the day before he died in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

Tags: historical, race, poverty. 

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:31 AM

On April 4, 1968 Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.   Shared above is his last speech given the day before he died in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

Tags: historical, race, poverty. 

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Why don't black and white Americans live together?

Why don't black and white Americans live together? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In many parts of the US, Americans of different races aren't neighbours - they don't go to the same schools, they don't always have access to the same services.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is filled with good geography (and more specifically AP Human Geography) vocabulary.  Redlining, blockbusting, and racial covenants are all discussed as spatial process that have shaped socioeconomic and racial characteristics in American cities. 

 

Tags: neighborhood, urban, socioeconomic, racepoverty, spatialhousing.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, February 2, 2016 9:30 AM

We have the same separation in DC. East of the River...

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 4, 2016 10:01 AM

unit 7

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 2016 6:22 AM

Segregatie in beeld

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Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor

Cities with the widest gap between rich, poor | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Based on the Gini coefficient, a measure that captures the level of income distribution in a given area, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the 20 metropolitan areas with the most uneven income distribution, or the highest Gini coefficients. A Gini coefficient of 1 means all income belongs to a single individual, while a coefficient of 0 reflects a perfectly even distribution. The Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Connecticut, metro area leads the nation with the worst income distribution.With only a few exceptions, the metro areas with the widest gaps between rich and poor residents tend to have lower median household incomes. The majority of the 20 metro areas with the highest Gini coefficients have median household incomes more than $10,000 below the national median of $52,250.Average incomes, however, tell a different story. Because of the uneven income distribution, the average income is much higher in most of these metro areas.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit in 2013).  This article explains the value of the Gini coefficient without delving much into the statistics.  


Tagsstatistics, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic, development, economic.

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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, August 29, 2015 2:21 PM

The article discusses the gaps between high income families and low income families in cities. This is mesured by what is called Gini coefficient and look so at a city's amount of poverty and wealthy people. The average income of a city is different and does not tell the imbalance between the high and low income families. It makes a city with a big divider in the two extremes not noticeable because ito makes the city look all around wealthy because of the weight of the higher income people. The Gini coefficient is different and shows that either there is a large majority of families that are wealthy in a city or of low income. Statistics for this have risen over the past decade dramatically since 2007. 

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Why Some Countries Are Poor and Others Rich

"The reason why some countries are rich and others poor depends on the quality of their institutions, the culture they have, the natural resources they find and what latitude they're on."


Tags: development, statistics, economic, globalization, poverty.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I can't say I agree with all the arguments put forward in this video, it can still be a nice starting point to get students to critically analyze the ideas put forth and assess the merits of the claims being made.

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Rob Duke's comment, July 30, 2015 3:34 PM
...certainly privilege from times past when there were no international watchdogs comes into play, but even when we control for colonialism, certain countries do much better than others. I'm inclined to think like Jared Diamond (The World Until Yesterday) and David Landes (The Wealth and Poverty of Nations. 1998) that institutions matter. If we protect property, provide vertical institutional support while also making room in the shadow of the law for ad hoc cooperation (see Elinor Ostrom's work), and protect intellectual property rights, we tend to have more wealth developed.
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:49 PM

I can't say I agree with all the arguments put forward in this video, it can still be a nice starting point to get students to critically analyze the ideas put forth and assess the merits of the claims being made.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 13, 11:15 AM
unit 6
Scooped by Seth Dixon
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Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"We have a myth today that the ghettos in metropolitan areas around the country are what the Supreme Court calls 'de-facto' — just the accident of the fact that people have not enough income to move into middle class neighborhoods or because real estate agents steered black and white families to different neighborhoods or because there was white flight.  It was not the unintended effect of benign policies, it was an explicit, racially purposeful policy that was pursued at all levels of government, and that's the reason we have these ghettos today and we are reaping the fruits of those policies."


Tags: economicrace, racism, historical, neighborhoodpodcast, urban, place, poverty, socioeconomic.

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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 3:57 PM

Ghettos were created because of many factors; one of these being in the 20th century real estate agents "blockbusting" basically meaning scaring white folks into thinking their neighborhood was becoming a slum causing them to quickly sell their house to real estate agents for an extremely low price and then turning around to sell the same house to black folks for much more because of limited homes for them to live in.

The ethnic neighborhoods and ghettos that still exist now are the result of people not having enough income to move to middle class neighborhoods and because real estate agents steered black and white families apart.