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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | Geography Education | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 

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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:05 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about how many countries in the world are experiencing a shrinking population in women. In about 83 countries women are going on marriage strikes by refusing to get married. This has caused a severe drop in the amount of women being born. There are predictions that some countries such as Hong Kong will see their last woman born in the year 2798. Many places are now trying to encourage people to have daughters in order to offset the low female composition. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it deals with population and sex composition. In man countries the female population is dramatically dropping and scientist are predicting women to die out. This also relates to government policies because some places are trying to change the outcome and encourage females. This shows what technology and visualization of populations can do to predict the future. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:25 PM

Summary:  This article provides an optimistic outlook on future population growth.  Stating that in wealthy countries and cities with no migration population may even disappear.  

 

Insight:  While this article seems very hard to believe considering what we've learned I think it represents Unit 2 very well because it still analyzes population growth over time based on female wealth.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:36 PM

This article illustrated how women are becoming more independent and educated. The article tells you that women, "... are preferring the single life, to marital yoke." This leads to the decrease of fertility rates. As women start to focus more on themselves and their career; instead of building a family, they tend to wait on having kids. This trend is occuring especially in Asian countries. Statistics from the UN conclude that if fertility rates don't increase, in 83 countries, women will not have daughters to replace them. For example Hong Kong, it is predicted that 1,000 women will only produce 547 daughters. The drop is now having reseachers predict when populations will see, "...birth of its last women". The female population in Hong will decrease from 3.75 million to 1 million in 25 generations. Researchers say Hong Kong will see the last, "...birth of its last women" in 2798!  The article used a country-year diagram to show what year the countries will see the last birth of its women.

 

This article relates to topics in Unit 2: Population and Migration. It uses a composition model to organize and efficiently show its data. The article and model shows patterns of fertility and prediction and facts of how a change in the lifestyle of women are affecting populations all over the world. Populations are greatly affected to the point where they can become eradicated. The article was really interesting and I was surprised at how short the predicted amount of time is for the last birth of a women in a population. This article also really illustrates and reveal how women play a big part in - what was- a man dominating world.

Geography Education
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Using 'Geography Education'

Using 'Geography Education' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This story map was created with ArcGIS Online to guide users on how to get the most out of the Geography Education websites on Wordpress and Scoop.it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This story map will introduce you to ways to get the most out of my Geography Education websites.  Updates are available on social media via Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, and Pinterest


I’ve organized some of more ‘evergreen’ posts by the AP Human Geography curriculum unit headings as well as ‘shortlist’ for each unit.       

  1. Geography: It’s Nature and Perspectives (shortlist)
  2. Population and Migration (shortlist)
  3. Cultural Patterns and Processes (shortlist)
  4. The Political Organization of Space (shortlist)
  5. Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use (shortlist)
  6. Industrialization and Economic Development (shortlist)
  7. Cities and Urban Land Use (shortlist)


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ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 23, 2016 2:47 AM
Using 'Geography Education'
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, December 3, 2016 9:33 PM
Just getting familiar with ArcGis and lots of ideas picked up at #ncss16
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Same again: Turkey’s emergency rule

Same again: Turkey’s emergency rule | Geography Education | Scoop.it

​The state of emergency in place since last summer’s coup attempt against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan resumes today for another three months, following a decision by the country’s security council. Emergency rule has now been extended four times. Over its course, more than 50,000 people have been arrested, and twice as many sacked from government jobs, including over 7,000 dismissals over the past week. On the anniversary of the coup Mr Erdogan said emergency rule would lapse only when “we no longer need to fight terrorism”, and vowed to reinstate the death penalty and “rip off” the coup plotters’ heads. Using the crisis as cover, the government has already locked up leading Kurdish politicians; the secular opposition may be next. Mr Erdogan accuses its leader, who recently led the biggest protest in years, of siding with Turkey’s enemies. The failed coup increasingly resembles a successful one—for the other side.

 

Tags: politicalMiddleEast, Turkey.

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How Does it Grow? Avocados

Avocados have become a super trendy food, but few of us know how they're even grown or harvested. We visit a California farm to uncover the amazing story of the avocado — and share the secrets to choosing, ripening and cutting the fruit.
Seth Dixon's insight:

My childhood house in the Los Angeles area had an avocado tree in the backyard; I now realize that the climatic demands of avocado production means this is a rarity in the United States, but as a kid I thought guacamole was as ubiquitous as peanut butter.  This 5-minute video is a good introduction to the avocado, it's production, environmental requirements, nutritional profile and diffusion.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that. WARNING: the video does mention the Nahuatl origin of the word (‘testicle-fruit’) in the video so as you manage your own classroom…just so you know. 

 

Tags: foodeconomic, agribusiness, video, agriculture.

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M Sullivan's curator insight, Today, 12:00 AM
An insight into how avocados are grown.
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Five gentrification myths debunked

'Gentrification' is a messy bogeyman of a term deserving more critical analysis. If 'gentrification' is 'exclusive economic development', what we want is INCLUSIVE economic development.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This post will need many disclaimers, but I think that it is a valuable addition to our gentrification materials since the key take-home point is that gentrification doesn’t happen the same way in all places (geographic context matters!). Some of the generalizations about gentrification around the country might not apply to some specific examples.  Are these generalizations true in some (and possibly most) contexts?  Sure, but unfortunately once people hear the word gentrification, they assume a base set of assumptions about the situation which may or may not be true.  The 5 myths outlined in this video (more detail in this Washington Post article) are:

  1. Gentrification leads to lower crime.
  2. Gentrification causes widespread displacement.
  3. Longtime residents hate gentrification.
  4. Gentrifiers are white.
  5. Gentrification happens naturally.

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic   

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Mr Mac's curator insight, July 6, 8:16 AM
Unit 7 - Gentrifications - specifically addressing "generalizations about Gentrification." 
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Pro Wrestling and Economic Restructuring

"For decades, professional wrestling in North America operated under a system of informally defined 'territories.' Each territory represented an individual promotion with its own stable of talent that drew crowds to local arenas and broadcast the product on regional television stations. In 1982, Vince McMahon purchased his father's company, the World Wrestling Federation. For almost two decades, he endured an epic conquest of the pro wrestling world that led to where he is today: standing tall as the undisputed king of the industry."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This may seem like a strange video for geography educators and students.  In one sense, the history of a wrestling entertainment business is trivial, but this provides a great example of how using economies of scale can overcome regional advantages as new technologies enter the market.  Maybe is not a 'real' sport, but the example of wrestling might pique a few students' interest as the economic principles are made manifest. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How do emerging technologies lead to economic disruption?  Why was regional systems so prevalent in the 1950s and1960s?  If Vince McMahon didn't pursue this plan, would there still be smaller, regional wrestling organizations?  Why or why not? 

 

Tags: regions, economic, diffusiontechnologysport, industry

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The real reason Amazon buying Whole Foods terrifies the competition

The real reason Amazon buying Whole Foods terrifies the competition | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Amazon’s zero-profit strategy is a disaster for anyone who goes up against it.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have more questions than definitive answers, so let's get right to it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How have technological and logistical shifts in various industries made this once unthinkable union workable?  How will a retailer like Amazon change the food industry on the production side of the equation? What are the advantages and disadvantages of creative destruction (eliminating old jobs by creating new ones)?  Who stands to benefit the most, and who are the most negatively impacted?    

 

Tagsindustry, economic, scale, agriculture, food production, agribusiness, food

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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 22, 9:35 AM
Unit 5 - Commercial Agriculture, Agribusiness, Food Distribution; Unit 6 - Services, Distribution of Services, Service and Technology
mouthpaptops's comment, June 24, 2:34 AM
good
charlytap's comment, June 30, 1:29 AM
nice
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'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before

'This is death to the family': Japan's fertility crisis is creating economic and social woes never seen before | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Shrinking GDP and a falling population are poised to turn Japan into what economists call a "demographic time bomb," and other countries could be next.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The article headline is quite click-baity, but there is some real substance to this article.  The graphs are especially useful to teach concepts such as population momentum and the age-dependency ratio. These were the key parts of the article that caught my eye:

  • An aging population will mean higher costs for the government, a shortage of pension and social security-type funds, a shortage of people to care for the very aged, slow economic growth, and a shortage of young workers.
  • Following feminism's slow build in Japan since the 1970s, today's workers strive for equality between the sexes, something Japan's pyramid-style corporate structure just isn't built for. That's because institutional knowledge is viewed as a big deal in Japan.
  • The elderly now make up 27% of Japan's population. In the US, the rate is only 15%. Experts predict the ratio in Japan could rise to 40% by 2050. With that comes rising social-security costs, which the shrinking younger generations are expected to bear.
  • To make up for an aging population and aversion toward immigrant work, Japan's tech sector has stepped up its efforts in robotics and artificial intelligence.

Tags: culture, genderlabor, populationmigration, JapanEast Asia.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 15, 10:51 AM
Unit 2 - Demographic Transition, Aging Population, Dependency Ratio, immigration policies; Unit 6 - Gender and Development, Development 
Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 16, 8:03 AM
Population unit 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 20, 10:34 PM

Preliminary HSc - Global challenges: Population

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What Rio doesn’t want the world to see

"Rio is hiding poor people. See Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BRTlHFpBU "

Seth Dixon's insight:

This isn't news, but it isn’t just about Rio de Janeiro, since the World Cup and Olympics have already come and gone. Yet the urban planning designed for the world’s gaze remains.  Some strategies used were to create economic development and stimulate the local communities, but more often than not, the poor of the city and the poor communities cities were swept under the rug without addressing the issues that creating poverty with the city.  Many of the poor communities closest to Olympic venues were demolished without real viable housing options for the displaced residents.

 

Questions to Ponder: Can you think of other ways (of other examples) that city planning is used to hide the poor or the ‘less desirable’ parts of the city?  Why does this happen?  How should urban planning approach economic redevelopment, poverty, and community?   

 

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, neighborhood, economicplanning, urbanism.

 

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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 10:03 AM
Unit 6 - Uneven Economic Development
M Sullivan's curator insight, June 14, 10:46 PM
Urban planning violating Human Rights
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2017 APHG Newsletters

2017 APHG Newsletters | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Greetings from Cincinnati, OH, home of the 2017 AP Human Geography reading.  Over 700 professionals are here to score over 200,000 exams.  I’ve been delighted in the past to share the Professional Development activities and newsletters and will continue to do so.  This post will be updated throughout the reading (June 2-8).

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How Clean is Narragansett Bay?

How Clean is Narragansett Bay? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The progress in Rhode Island toward clean water owes a lot to this federal law. Seeing urban rivers and the beaches and coves of the upper bay rediscovered as natural assets for wildlife and people to enjoy is one of the great successes of the Clean Water Act [of 1972]."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article from geographer Mary Grady shows a pleasant story in the human and environmental interaction.  The upper bay (that in-between place where the Providence River widens and becomes part of the Narragansett Bay) has been cleaned up and has ecologically been revitalized and is becoming an asset to the community again.  It is far from pristine, but it nice to read about encouraging signs on this front.  

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Massive landslide adds to ‘unprecedented’ damage along scenic Highway 1 in Big Sur area

Massive landslide adds to ‘unprecedented’ damage along scenic Highway 1 in Big Sur area | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A massive mudslide along the California coast.  Millions tons of rock/dirt, about 1/3 mile of roadway covered 35-40 feet deep.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

A steep slope, unstable ground, and changing moisture content result is this spectacular (and horrifying) example of how the Earth beneath our feet might not be as permanent as we expect it to be.

 

Questions to Ponder: Which type of mass wasting is seen in this particular example?  What conditions would lead to other types of mass wasting?  

 

Tags: physicalCalifornia, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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4 ways to make a city more walkable

4 ways to make a city more walkable | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Freedom from cars, freedom from sprawl, freedom to walk your city! City planner Jeff Speck shares his "general theory of walkability" -- four planning principles to transform sprawling cities of six-lane highways and 600-foot blocks into safe, walkable oases full of bike lanes and tree-lined streets.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As the 2017 APHG exam has ended, some people have asked for more resources on new urbanism.  This TED talk from Jeff Speck gives a good sense of what planners believe in new urbanism are trying to do (you can also watch his earlier TED talk, The Walkable City).  Here is information from New Urbanism (dot org) from it's practioners, including the Congress on New Urbanism.  Lastly, here is an academic article reviewing the critiques of new urbanism with rebuttals.  

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planningtransportation, urbanism, scaleTED, video.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, May 23, 9:21 AM
Geography Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective.
Alex Smiga's curator insight, May 31, 10:08 AM
Share your insight
Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 10:09 AM
Unit 7 - New Urbanism
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My Family’s Slave

My Family’s Slave | Geography Education | Scoop.it
She lived with us for 56 years. She raised me and my siblings without pay. I was 11, a typical American kid, before I realized who she was.

 

The Spanish Crown eventually began phasing out slavery at home and in its colonies, but parts of the Philippines were so far-flung that authorities couldn’t keep a close eye. Traditions persisted under different guises, even after the U.S. took control of the islands in 1898. Today even the poor can have utusans or katulongs (“helpers”) or kasambahays (“domestics”), as long as there are people even poorer. The pool is deep.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article created a huge stir from the moment it was published, especially within the U.S. Filipino community.  Slavery is reprehensible, but to most people today, it is incomprehensible to imagine how one human could ever enslave another.  This story of a Filipino family that brought a ‘domestic worker’ with them to the United States is a riveting tale that offers glimpses into the cultural context of modern-day slavery.  The author was born into this family and it’s a painful tale intermingled with agony, love, cruelty, tenderness, guilt, and growth.  This article is a long read, but well worth it.  You can listen to a 55-minute audio version of the article, or also listen to the NPR 5-minute version.    

 

Tags: migrationlaborPhilippines, culture.

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With only one left, iconic yellow road sign showing running immigrants now borders on the extinct

With only one left, iconic yellow road sign showing running immigrants now borders on the extinct | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Only one of the 10 iconic Caltrans caution signs emblazoned with the image of an immigrant father, mother and daughter running for their lives remains. They once dotted Interstate 5.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As a child of the border (I grew up 8 miles from the U.S.-Mexican border with family on both sides of the line), the cultural, political and economic impacts of this line were very tangible in my life, but to mention family.  This sign was a symbol of mass migration and cultural change in Southern California and I would pass one on the way to my grandmother’s house.  As a fixture of the cultural landscape, it also became a visual talking point that served as a lightning rod in the political landscape.  During the 80’s and 90’s, immigrants from Mexico were coming in to the United States is large numbers, but since the 2000, that dominant stream has dried up, rendering this sign no longer necessary near freeways crossings.  Mexican migration to and from the United States is a contentious topic where political ideology can be louder than the actual statistics.  Since 2009, more Mexicans have been leaving the United States than entering it (PEW Research Center).  Economic and demographic shifts in both countries have led to this reversal.    

 

Tags: Mexico, migration, political, landscape, California, borders.   

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In the Same Ballpark

In the Same Ballpark | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In 1992, the Baltimore Orioles opened their baseball season at a brand new stadium called Oriole Park at Camden Yards, right along the downtown harbor. The stadium was small and intimate, built with brick and iron trusses—a throwback to the classic ballparks from the early 20th century. It was popular right from the start.

These new Populous ballparks are small and old fashioned-looking but they also feature modern amenities—comfortable seats and fancy foods. And while designed to be different, they tend to follow a similar aesthetic format, featuring a lot red brick and green-painted iron. These new parks also feature asymmetrical playing fields, which are in many cases dictated by the surrounding cityscape."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This podcast is filled with important urban geographic issues: downtown revitalization, landscape aesthetics, sense of place, planning, public/private revitalization, etc.  And to boot, this podcast uses America's pasttime to discuss these topics. I typically really enjoy the thoughtful exploration of the untold stories that make up our world found in the 99 Percent Invisible podcast.

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As U.S. Life Expectancies Climb, People In A Few Places Are Dying Younger

As U.S. Life Expectancies Climb, People In A Few Places Are Dying Younger | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The wealthiest country, which spends the most money on care for the sick, has far from the best health outcomes. Babies born in eastern Kentucky, along the Mississippi Delta and on Native American reservations in the Dakotas have the lowest life expectancies in the country. If current health trends continue, they aren’t expected to live much beyond an average of 70 years. Meanwhile, a baby born along the wealthy coast of California can be expected to live as long as 85 years, the authors found."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What geographic and socioeconomic factors shape mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, developmentregions, USA, population, statistics.

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Julia May's curator insight, July 20, 1:21 PM
Very interesting article but a haunting truth! 
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Enclaves & Exclaves

Enclaves & Exclaves | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A tour of the world's engulfed and orphaned places.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This storymap is a full length article about all the intricacies about enclaves and exclaves, but the interactive format, visuals and maps really make this much more than another article on the topic.    

 

Tags: borders, political, mappingESRIStoryMap.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, July 3, 12:08 PM
Unit 1 - Mapping; Unit 3/4 - Ethnic Enclaves and Exclaves 
Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 5, 6:08 PM

Political geography 

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How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel

How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel | Geography Education | Scoop.it
THE SIX-DAY WAR increased Israel’s territory threefold. The “borders of Auschwitz” were gone; the vulnerable nine-mile narrow waist acquired a thick cuirass with the mountains of the West Bank. Israel soon annexed East Jerusalem with some surrounding land; it did the same with the Golan Heights in 1981.

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, borders, political, Middle East.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 27, 1:24 PM
Unit 4 - Borders, Wars 
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 4, 2:22 AM
How the 1967 war changed the shape of Israel
Allison Anthony's curator insight, July 5, 6:12 PM

Middle East/Southwest Asia

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A History Of Sudan's Civil Wars & Conflict

This is the story of how Sudan became two nations, and of an ongoing conflict in the Nuba Mountains that has changed the lives of millions of people. In parts 2–5 of our VR series, We Who Remain, follow the lives of four people living through the war: http://ajplus.co/nuba360. Produced in partnership with Nuba Reports and Emblematic Group.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The first video in this 5-part video is a bit slow, but provides the historical and geographic context needed to understand the developmental, ethnic, and political issues that remain so difficult to resolve.  The Subsequent four videos provide a more human, personal glimpse into facets of the conflict. 

 

Tags: Sudan, politicalethnicity, Africa, war.

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Mr Mac's curator insight, June 19, 2:30 PM
Unit 3/4 - Ethnicity, Nationality, Centrifugal Forces 
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 4, 2:59 AM
A History Of Sudan's Civil Wars & Conflict
Mr Mac's curator insight, July 11, 8:23 PM
Unit 4 - Political Geography, International Conflict, Multinational States, Centrifugal Forces
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2017 APHG Test Debrief

"All the tweets regarding the 2017 APHG exam from the official social media outlet of College Board, Trevor Packer, Vice President of Advanced Placement."

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 16, 8:05 AM
2017 APHG  exam info from CBs Trevor Packer
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2017 APHG Professional Development

2017 APHG Professional Development | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"One of the greatest aspects of the APHG reading is the professional networking, collaboration and sharing that happens with this enthusiastic set of high school and college educators.  In addition to the fun evening activities, every year we also hold several professional development activities in the evening."

 

On Tuesday evening, June 6th, we had an incredibly dynamic guest speaker with a gift for making his research relevant to his audience.  Chris McMorran talk was entitled, “Geographies of Home: producing home across scale in Japan and Singapore.”  He generously provided the digital copy of his PPTx slides with his permission to use them in your classrooms (High Resolution with multimedia-70 MB, Medium Resolution with multimedia-57 MB, Low Resolution without multimedia-15 MB). 

On Wednesday evening, June 7th we had our annual "Night of the Round Tables" event.  This event was designed to create a place to share new ideas, pick up lesson plans, discover new resources, and develop strategies for teaching geography.  Presenters had 15 minutes to present.  Below are the digital copies of the presentations and the handouts that they wanted to share:

Tags: APHG, teacher training, geography education.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 20, 10:17 AM
Excellent presentation and resources.
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America's Best Long Trails

America's Best Long Trails | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Plan your next big hike with this map of America's most-loved long trails.
Seth Dixon's insight:

My uncle hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail and as a kid the enormity of that feat was both inspirational and mind-boggling.  Recently I watched an incredible documentary about an ultra-marathoner's quest on Vermont's Long Trail (Finding Traction: free on Amazon Prime--trailer here).  While I doubt most of us could go the full length of these trails given our jobs, fitness levels, etc., I do think that getting outside to explore some of the physical environments in our local areas this summer sounds like a fantastic idea (high-res map here).  

 

Tags: transportation, landscape, place, sportphysical, environment, mappingmap.

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Bridget Barker's curator insight, June 1, 1:27 PM
Not related to fungal pathogens, but work life balance is important!
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Esri GeoInquiries™ for World History

Esri GeoInquiries™ for World History | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Esri Education Outreach team is pleased to announce the release of a sample pack from the forthcoming GeoInquiries™ collection for World History classrooms.  The sample pack includes the first four activities supporting high school World History instruction with ArcGIS Online.  Eleven additional activities will be released over the coming weeks."

Seth Dixon's insight:

ESRI has produced GeoInquires for Earth Science, US History, Environmental Science, AP Human Geography, 4th grade, and has recently released a now has a set for World History.

Tagsmappinggeospatialempire, historical, ESRI, K12, edtech.

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Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 28, 7:37 PM
Holy Moly! What a great resource.
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Drought and Famine

In which John Green teaches you a little bit about drought, which is a natural weather phenomenon, and famine, which is almost always the result of human activity. Throughout human history, when food shortages strike humanity, there was food around. There was just a failure to connect those people with the food that would keep them alive. There are a lot of reasons that food distribution breaks down, and John is going to teach you about them in the context of the late-19th century famines that struck British India.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Famine is exacerbated by natural factors such as drought, but those only stress the system, they rarely cause the actual starvation.  The real failure is that the political/economic systems created by governments and how they handle stains in the food production/distribution systems.  Widespread famines are very rare in democracies and are much more prevalent in authoritarian regimes.  Many of the recent examples have come from collectivation strategies that governments have implemented (currently Venezuela, but historically the Soviet Union and China).  The Choices program has some good resources about teaching current events with the famines today.

 

Tags: food, povertyhistoricalcolonialism, economic, political, governance, agriculture, crash course

 

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The Fallacy of Endless Economic Growth

The Fallacy of Endless Economic Growth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What economists around the world get wrong about the future.

 

The idea that economic growth can continue forever on a finite planet is the unifying faith of industrial civilization. That it is nonsensical in the extreme, a deluded fantasy, doesn't appear to bother us. We hear the holy truth in the decrees of elected officials, in the laments of economists about flagging GDP, in the authoritative pages of opinion, in the whirligig of advertising, at the World Bank and on Wall Street, in the prospectuses of globe-spanning corporations and in the halls of the smallest small-town chambers of commerce. Growth is sacrosanct. Growth will bring jobs and income, which allow us entry into the state of grace known as affluence, which permits us to consume more, providing more jobs for more people producing more goods and services so that the all-mighty economy can continue to grow. "Growth is our idol, our golden calf," Herman Daly, an economist known for his anti-growth heresies, told me recently.

 

Tagsop-ed, economicindustry, sustainability, development, consumption, climate change, environment, resources.

 

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Human Settlement Predictive Model

"Simulating climate conditions over the last 125,000 years and predicting how those changes would have allowed humans to spread around the globe, this video models human migration patterns." Read more: http://ow.ly/lWIp304qZEo

Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Economic Forum noted that some spatial research that was originally published in Nature, shows how geneticists took DNA samples from people of different cultures in different parts of the world to track their dispersal throughout the globe.  The video uses climatic data, combined with the genetic data, to create a model showing how the human race spread across the globe over a 125,000 year period.

 

Tagsdiffusiondemographicsmappingmigration, populationhistorical, video, visualization.

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, May 18, 12:11 AM
Some interesting modelling based on climate change. I wonder what it would look like based on something different? Cultural differences? What came first culture or climate?