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World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Author of Mapping the Nation, Susan Schulten explains how historical events created a huge demands for maps, revolutionizing the industry and leading to many new ways of visualizing the world.  


Tags: historical, mapping, war.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 2014 10:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:59 PM

APHG-U1

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:06 PM

Whenever there is war, Americans want maps.  They want to know about where conflict is, how far away from home it is, and why people are being sent to the places they are being sent.  With the new map ideas in World War II from Harrison maps were made to better display distance and direction to people.  He used different projections in areas.  He also drew maps from different places, for example what does Japan look like when you are in Siberia.  Transforming flat maps back to having some sort of global shape was exactly what we needed to get away from the old outdated unreliable style of maps.

Geography Education
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Curated by Seth Dixon