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Exit polls show Crimea votes for secession

Exit polls show Crimea votes for secession | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Russian media says exit polls show 93 percent of voters elected to join Russia, in a move the West deems illegal.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The vote wasn't a surprise, but it now means there are more questions than answers about the political future of Crimea,  both regionally and internationally (this is the U.S. State Dept's rejection of the referendum).  Also is interest is how this impacts Turkey, which feels kinship with the Crimean Tatar population.  Historically they've been Black Sea rivals and Turkey was a key NATO ally during the Cold War.  However since the fall of the the Soviet Union they've improved diplomatic relations and Turkey is reluctant to damage relations with Russia.  We all know by now that the majority of Crimean residents speak Russian as their native language, but what's the linguistic geography of Crimea look like at a at a different scale?    

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Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, March 17, 2014 2:30 PM

Seth Dixon's insight:
The vote wasn't a surprise, but it now means there are more questions than answers about the political future of Crimea, both regionally and internationally. Also is interest is how this impacts Turkey, which feels kinship with the Crimean Tatar population. Historically they've been Black Sea rivals and Turkey was a key NATO ally during the Cold War. However since the fall of the the Soviet Union they've improved diplomatic relations and Turkey is reluctant to damage relations with Russia. We all know by now that the majority of Crimean residents speak Russian as their native language, but what's the linguistic geography of Crimea look like at a at a different scale?

Aimee Knight's curator insight, March 19, 2014 9:52 AM

While everybody argues over whether or not the referendum complies with international laws and peace treaties, we have to ask, is it right? Does one country have the right to take control of another? We teach our children not to bully one another, and then Russia goes and bullies the people of Crimea into agreeing to secede. What are we teaching people? What messages are we sending to young people by saying that this is okay?  We are spreading the word that it is okay to threaten others into cooperation. If we allow for acts such as this to go unpunished, how can we guarantee that something much worse will not be in our foreseeable future? 

BandKids13-14's curator insight, April 3, 2014 9:56 AM

Russia is just a big bully. If Crimea joins Russia will Russia want to take over other places in the Ukraine? Will they have enough power then? Why do they even want Crimea? How will they benefit if Crimea goes over to Russian power? Will the Ukraine allow Crimea to ever join Russia?

~Jessica 

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