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Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style

Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At a new restaurant, expats find a taste of home and locals try foreign treats like fortune cookies.


Imagine living in China and missing Chinese food. It happens. American expatriates who grew up with popular takeout dishes like General Tso's chicken can't find it in China because it essentially doesn't exist here. Much of the Chinese food we grew up with isn't really Chinese. It's an American version of Chinese food. Chinese immigrants created it over time, adapting recipes with U.S. ingredients to appeal to American palates.  Now, Americans living in Shanghai can get a fix of their beloved Chinatown cuisine at a new restaurant.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The is just one more delicious example of how globalization impacts cultural products.  Globalization flows in many unexpected directions.  For more, see this TED talk on the search for the origins of General Tso's chicken.    


Tags: foodglobalization, culture, China, East Asia, podcast.

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Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 4:59 PM
This story is awesome! the differences between Chinese and Chinese American food show how globalization and immigration fuses cultures together. The owners of Fortune Cookie are able to share the American Chinese food only because of globalization. If they could not receive American products and brands such as skippy peanut butter and heinz ketchup, the restaurant simply would not function for its purpose.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:53 AM

This story is awesome! the differences between Chinese and Chinese American food show how globalization and immigration fuses cultures together. The owners of Fortune Cookie are able to share the American Chinese food only because of globalization. If they could not receive American products and brands such as skippy peanut butter and heinz ketchup, the restaurant simply would not function for its purpose.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 8:53 AM
Most people in the United States do not question cultural authenticity in regards to ethnic food. It is safe to say that most ethnic foods in the US could be considered fusion. What is incredibly interesting, is that globalization has allowed for different cultural communities to thrive in foreign countries. The substantial American population in Shanghai has allowed for the blossoming of a new American-Chinese restaurant. It would not be surprising if this theme of American fusion restaurants spreads to other places with high ex-pat populations.
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Curated by Seth Dixon