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Should we be worried?

Seth Dixon's insight:

Overpopulation is a term that is often used and many assume that global population growth is a 'population bomb' to will be one of the major problems in the next 50 years.  Some researchers argue that the problem is overstated; in this 20 minute lecture geographer Danny Dorling says that overconsumption is the real issue, not population growth per se.  In this New York Times article, geographer Earle Ellis discusses how the world's carrying capacity expands with technological advances and that demographic statistics show that growth won't continue forever.  Others fear that humanity will outstrip the world's carrying capacity, including the letters to the editor responding to the original NY Times article.


Questions to Ponder: Do you see population growth as a looming problem that will negatively impact humanity?  If so how much should we be concerned? 


Tags: population, demographics.

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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 4:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Hongsheng Li's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:18 PM

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:49 PM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population. As the population increases so does need for food, which increases global agriculture and pollution

Geography Education
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