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A 250-mile show of support for Catalonia independence

A 250-mile show of support for Catalonia independence | Geography Education | Scoop.it
More than 1 million flag-draped and face-painted Catalans held hands and formed a 250-mile human chain across the northeastern Spanish region Wednesday in a demonstration of their desires for independence.
Seth Dixon's insight:

September 11th means different things is different places.  While many Americans were remembering the terrorist attacks of 2001, it was Catalonian National Day.  In addition to the festivities, they organized a massive public demonstration to support independence and to garner international attention.  They created a 'human border' that sretched across the region to apply pressure on the Spanish government to allow a vote that would let Catalonia break away and form their own country.  While this energy and enthusiasm swept Barcelona, the Spanish government stopped the protest from spreading into neighboring Valencia (many Valencians speak Catalan).

  

Questions to Ponder: How do events such as this in public places impact the political process?  Is it significant that the link about the Spanish government stopping Valencia comes from a Scottish newspaper?  Why?  How can social media and technology (such as the hastags #CatalanWay #ViaCatalana) impact social movements?  


Tags: Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomyEurope, culture.

more...
MIquel Ribas's comment, September 16, 2013 8:59 AM
Some people argue that these desires for independence (we are talking about a region covering 30.000 Km2) are obsolete in a global world that tends to eliminate borders. There are some questions to ponder about it: 1) Does this criticism come from countries with recognized state structures and no fear about the maintenance of their culture?, or instead of this, come from places never recognized as countries, such as Catalonia? 2) May the independence feeling be a search of regeneration of the political life, in order to achieve greater people’s participation in the collective decisions (we mustn’t forget here the internal problems of Spanish democracy, crippled by corruption, crisis and scandals)? Could be this increasing independence feeling another way to question lacks of the system, in a similar way that many other types of protest have arisen out around the world? Then, the point would be more than simple nationalism....
Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 1:15 AM

Catalonia struggles for it's independence from Spain. The wealthy region of Spain angers for becoming it's own country, with sentiments of not getting what they deserve from Spain, such as government services. Spain urges Catalonia to not make such a fuss and head Spain into another civil war. But Catalonia wants to be autonomous at least. Their independence parade is to show Spain they won't back down.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 1:36 PM

These peaceful collections of people working toward a single goal is nice to see. Catalans have an immense amount of national pride even though they are not technically separate from Spain.

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