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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"
Seth Dixon's insight:

An isogloss is a line that divides regions based on the words that are used to describe the same item or concept.  This series of 22 maps is a delicious way to visualize some of the lingusitic differences in the United States.  Why are these distinct vocabulary terms regionally used? 


Notice that this map shows that Rhode Island and Wisconsin are distinct in using the term "bubbler" where there rest of the country would refer to the same object as a drinking fountain (West) or a water fountain (South).


Tags: language, North America, mapping, regions.

more...
Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 12:50 PM

This series of maps shows the small regional differences across the US, highlighting small cultural differences that are often overlooked. The maps show the regional boundaries for language and how it generally follows the different cultural regions of the country instead of state by state. The majority of the west usually uses the same word, while the south and northeast of the country often have their own way of saying things. After viewing the maps it's easy to see that the south tends to be the most different, using its own word or pronunciation that is different from the rest of the country.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 6:57 PM

I chose this scoop because the title "Not All English is the Same" really stuck out at me. It made me think back to the other article I did on 107 regional slang words. This article was about accents and that everyone pronounces everything differently depending on where you are located in the world. In the main map being shown, they ask the question "What do you call a miniature lobster that one finds in lakes and streams?" A majority of the United States calls it a crawfish, represented by the color red. Another portion calls it a crayfish, represented by the color green. A few people call it a crawdad which is shown in blue and some people just have no word for something that fits this description. It was interesting to see that most of the places that called it a crawfish are located down the Eastern border of the US, with the exception of the scattered states. The people that called it a crayfish are mostly located in the middle of the US and the people who classify it as a crawdad are mostly located in the Northeast.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 12:16 AM

I chose this scoop because the title "Not All English is the Same" really stuck out at me. It made me think back to the other article I did on 107 regional slang words. This article was about accents and that everyone pronounces everything differently depending on where you are located in the world. In the main map being shown, they ask the question "What do you call a miniature lobster that one finds in lakes and streams?" A majority of the United States calls it a crawfish, represented by the color red. Another portion calls it a crayfish, represented by the color green. A few people call it a crawdad which is shown in blue and some people just have no word for something that fits this description. It was interesting to see that most of the places that called it a crawfish are located down the Eastern border of the US, with the exception of the scattered states. The people that called it a crayfish are mostly located in the middle of the US and the people who classify it as a crawdad are mostly located in the Northeast.

Geography Education
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Curated by Seth Dixon