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Mount Dixon Explodes!

Mount Dixon Explodes! | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An initial analysis of the Mount Dixon landslide in New Zealand on Monday
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are some great images (and a post-landslide helicopter flight video) of the massive landslide that occurred Jan 21, 2013.  The rockslide extends over 3 km, with an elevation change of approximately 800 meters.  This is an excellent example to help students visualize mass wasting, alpine glaciation and erosion in general.  While the mountain didn't explode strictly speaking, I couldn't help but love the headline "Mount Dixon explodes!"    


Tags: New Zealand, physical, geomorphology, erosion.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 4:58 PM

Just an incredible sight to see.  The helicopter video is truly an amazing must see for anyone.  Just to imagine what it would be like to be there when it happened.  The speed at whcih the landslide moved plus the sounds it must have made would have been a once and a lifetime even, but if you were that close when it happened, it might be the end of your lifetime...what a way to go!

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 10:49 AM

Mount Dixon's landslide is due to the mountain itself being unstable. The landslide pattern is normal in retrospect to other landslides that have happened over the years. The before and after pictures are a clear depiction of the landslide path from top to bottom.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 12:13 PM

There was a large landslide on Mount Dixon in New Zealand and this article not only explains what may have happened, there is also a video that you can watch to try and understand it better. This landslide had a large fall height and a long distance that it fell out from. The landslide fell on the west side of the mountain and removed a big section from the top. These photographs are miraculous to see and give you a better perspective of the fall and the direction of the landslide. The impact removed all of the snow and ice that was on the surface and the slide appeared to have ran energy by where it stopped. 

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