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Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty

Tropical Diseases: The New Plague of Poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Extreme poverty in the United States is giving rise to a group of infections known as the neglected tropical diseases, which we ordinarily think of as confined to developing countries.

 

Poor Americans are more likely to contract tropical diseases such as Chagas disease and dengue fever.  Question to ponder: what geographic factors (physical and human) lead poor people in the United States to be more heavily impacted by the spread to these diseases?

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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 25, 2013 3:23 PM
I think it is absurd that the pharmaceutical companies don't see it beneficial enough to produce the vaccines necessary to prevent outbreaks of the potentially harmful diseases. These people may be low-income, but they are still humans and there is no barrier stopping the spreading to middle-class higher income families.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
With the level of development in the United States and the amount of technology there is, it is a little surprising to see such a large number of people living in poverty, but at the same time it is almost expected. Minorities make up the bulk of those living in poverty, which are the biggest targets for these rapidly spreading diseases. Since these people unfortunately receive a below average salary, if any at all, they don’t get the proper health care needed and their symptoms are often overlooked or neglected. They are basically prone to get infected because either their health care provider does not have the knowledge to diagnose and treat these diseases before they spread or the patient does not have the money to pay for treatment and vaccines. These prolonged and chronic diseases are what cause them to stay in the financial situations they are in. Helping these people get better healthcare and providing the doctors with the education needed for these diseases would definitely help. I do find it absurd that some pharmacists believe it is unnecessary to make vaccines when this could easily be passed down from a pregnant woman to her offspring, creating another generation of health disasters.
Alex Weaver's curator insight, October 14, 2013 4:11 PM

NTDs creates a vicious poverty cycle, but WE can help end this

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