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8 Amazing Drowned Buildings

8 Amazing Drowned Buildings | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The majority of these 'drowned buildings' are the direct result of decisions to dam a river and create a reservoir, create hydroelectricity, etc.  How should we analyze this type of cultural landscape?  What does it 'say' about the multiple groups that have contributed to this layered, complex landscape?  Pictured here is the St. Nicolas Church in Macedonia, an 1850 building that is losing to the unrelenting 2003 reservoir that at times fully submerges the building.     

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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Using 'Geography Education'

Using 'Geography Education' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This story map was created with ArcGIS Online to guide users on how to get the most out of the Geography Education websites on Wordpress and Scoop.it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This story map will introduce you to ways to get the most out of my Geography Education websites.  Updates are available on social media via Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, and Pinterest


I’ve organized some of more ‘evergreen’ posts by the AP Human Geography curriculum unit headings as well as ‘shortlist’ for each unit.       

  1. Geography: It’s Nature and Perspectives (shortlist)
  2. Population and Migration (shortlist)
  3. Cultural Patterns and Processes (shortlist)
  4. The Political Organization of Space (shortlist)
  5. Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use (shortlist)
  6. Industrialization and Economic Development (shortlist)
  7. Cities and Urban Land Use (shortlist)


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ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 23, 2016 2:47 AM
Using 'Geography Education'
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, December 3, 2016 9:33 PM
Just getting familiar with ArcGis and lots of ideas picked up at #ncss16
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Corinth Canal

Corinth Canal | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This photograph, taken by an astronaut aboard the International Space Station, shows the straight line of the Corinth Canal as it crosses a narrow isthmus between mainland Greece (right) and the Peloponnese Peninsula. The canal cuts through the narrowest part of the isthmus of Corinth. The goal was to save ships from the dangerous 700-kilometer voyage around the ragged coastline of the peninsula."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What does the word Isthmus mean and how does this image help tell that story?  When did people start modifying Earth's physical systems?  What factors do we need to consider when evaluating the impacts of human modifications to the environment?    

 

Tags: water, coastal, landformsGreece.

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Korean Baseball 101: Way Beyond the Bat Flips

Baseball in South Korea is more than a game. It’s akin to a religion. American missionaries first brought the sport to the peninsula in 1905, and the country absolutely loved it. Today, the Korean Baseball Organization (KBO) features 10 teams and a unique sporting culture all its own. The city of Busan and its hometown Lotte Giants have a particularly passionate fan base. From the hitters’ flashy bat flips, to the team’s famous “cheermaster” and its unlikely American super fan, consider this is your crash course on the joyful madness that is Lotte Giants fandom.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If a sport (or other cultural practice) diffuses to a new place, is it going to look exactly the same as it does in the original cultural hearth? Maybe, or like baseball in South Korea, it can have a culture all its own. This is an interesting story that shows how the diffusion of cultural traits around the globe doesn't have to lead to a more bland cultural mosaic. As cultural traits are reterritorialized into new places, they add vibrancy to the cultural fabric of the institution/sub-culture that they've adopted.

 

 

Tags: sport, popular culturediffusion, culturecultural norms, South Korea, East Asia.

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Braves' New Ballpark Is An Urban Planner's Nightmare 

Braves' New Ballpark Is An Urban Planner's Nightmare  | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“The Braves chose to relocate to Cobb County from downtown Atlanta’s Turner Field after only 19 years because of a $400 million public subsidy from Cobb taxpayers. The costs are almost certain to balloon thanks to some significant fiscal buffoonery on the part of Cobb officials, including a lack of a comprehensive transportation plan and forgetting to ask the Braves to pay for traffic cops. Attached to SunTrust Park like a Cinnabon-scented goiter is the Battery Atlanta, a $550M mixed-used development that looks an awful lot like a New Urbanist project, the widely criticized school of planning that is equal parts social engineering and neoliberalism. SunTrust isn’t solely accessible by car—the Braves run a stadium shuttle bus that serves a couple of outer MARTA stations—but, compared to the team’s former home, the non-motorized options are paltry.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are many great geography angles to look at this particular issue.  The scale of governance matters in creating the political context for any given situation.  In this article, we see City vs. County vs. Metropolitan regional politics jockey for position, putting the interest of their own county above that of the larger metropolitan region.  We also see competing visions of ideal urban planning (a more sprawling, automobile-centered model vs. public transit, multi-use planning that is enclosed vs. open) all layered upon racial and socio-economic context of this particular place.   

 

Tagsarchitecture, scale, sport, urban, planning, urbanism, economic.

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Spain crisis: 'stop this radicalism and disobedience,' PM tells Catalan leaders

Spain crisis: 'stop this radicalism and disobedience,' PM tells Catalan leaders | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Spain’s prime minister has called on Catalan separatist leaders to end their 'escalation' as several thousand people took to the streets of Barcelona to protest at Madrid’s attempts to stop a banned referendum on independence. 'Stop this escalation of radicalism and disobedience once and for all.' Catalonia’s president earlier accused the Spanish government of suspending the region’s autonomy after police intensified efforts to stop a vote on independence that has sparked one of the worst political crises since Spain’s return to democracy four decades ago. Spanish Guardia Civil officers raided a dozen Catalan regional government offices and arrested 14 senior officials on Wednesday as part of an operation to stop the referendum from taking place on 1 October."

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you are looking for an example of devolution today, this is it.  This situation has escalated as Spain and Catalonia's governments cannot work together.  The referendum was (according to the Spanish government) outlawed but keep an eye on Catalonia over the next few weeks. 
UPDATE: This video from the Economist is an excellent summary of the situation.
 

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomyEurope.

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Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 1:20 PM
This situation has escalated as Spain and Catalonia's governments cannot work together. The referendum was (according to the Spanish government) outlawed but keep an eye on Catalonia over the next few weeks. UPDATE: This video from the Economist is an excellent summary of the situation.
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Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: What regions can you identify as a part of a trend?  What possible factors have led to these patterns?  What are the long-term implications of this data? 

 

Tags: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, models, migration. 

 

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HumdeBut's curator insight, September 25, 12:12 PM
Voici une carte bien intéressante,où l'on peut voir les pôles d'attraction !
M Sullivan's curator insight, September 28, 9:41 PM
Interesting looking at Europe's population change. Good reference for analysing geographical trends.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 3:04 AM

Global challenges: Population 

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Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff?

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What is life like in the country projected to have the world's fastest-shrinking population?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good case-study to show how demographic decline coupled with economic decline, with exacerbate problems with a  consistent out-migration flow.   

 

Tags: Bulgaria, declining populationpopulationmigration.

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The Rohingya in Myanmar: How Years of Strife Grew Into a Crisis

The Rohingya in Myanmar: How Years of Strife Grew Into a Crisis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Life has long been fraught for a Muslim minority in mainly Buddhist Myanmar, but the recent “ethnic cleansing” has sent Rohingya fleeing en masse.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many students have asked the question "Who are the Rohingya?" The Muslim minority group, concentrated near the Bangladeshi has a long history of marginalization. Its members lack full citizenship in Myanmar (Burma), and many in Myanmar deny that the Rohingya are a native ethnic group, claiming that they are recent Bengali immigrants. Now, fierce clashes between security forces and Rohingya militants left hundreds dead and entire villages torched to the ground. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have fled over the border into Bangladesh.

 

Tags: migration, politicalconflict, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

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M Sullivan's curator insight, September 19, 9:00 PM
Shocking reality of life for people in Myanmar to follow on from reading the novel 'Bamboo People' by Mitali Perkins.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 3:07 AM

Global challenges - Population - including Migration - refugees

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Homeland of tea

Homeland of tea | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"China is the world’s biggest tea producer, selling many varieties of tea leaves such as green tea, black tea, oolong tea, white tea and yellow tea. Different regions are famous for growing different types of tea. Hangzhou is famous for producing a type of green tea called Longjing or the Dragon Well tea. Tea tastes also vary regionally. Drinkers in Beijing tend to prefer jasmine tea while in Shanghai prefer green tea. Processing raw tea leaves for consumption is a time and labor-intensive activity and still done by hand in many areas in China. The Chinese tea industry employs around 80 million people as farmers, pickers and sales people. Tea pickers tend to be seasonal workers who migrate from all parts of the country during harvest time. In 2016, China produced 2.43 million tons of tea."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tea, the world's most popular beverage, doesn't just magically appear on kitchen tables--it's production and consumption is shaped by geographic forces, cultural preferences, and regional variations.  These 21 images show the cultural, region, and environmental, economic, and agricultural context of tea.  

 

Tagsimages, foodChina, East Asia, economic, labor, food production, agriculture.

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Disaster Mapping: Hurricane Irma, Mexico Earthquake and Bangladesh Floods

Disaster Mapping: Hurricane Irma, Mexico Earthquake and Bangladesh Floods | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This week has seen disasters and destruction on an unprecedented scale, and the HOT Community has activated to respond. Hurricane Irma is the largest Hurricane ever recorded, and has torn death and destruction through the Caribbean. Destruction on some islands is estimated at 95%, affecting the lives of 1.2 million so far, and on track to cause severe destruction across the entire Florida State, where mass evacuation is currently underway. Barbuda’s prime minister, Gaston Browne, described the damage as absolutely heart-wrenching. 'The island is literally under water and barely habitable,' Browne said. 'About 95% of properties are damaged, there is a serious threat of disease. Additionally, those already affected by Irma fear a second brutal battering by Hurricane Jose.'"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are most vulnerable to natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  My students and I join OpenStreetMap (OSM) projects, especially when there is a major humanitarian need...it's a great way to make service learning and geospatial technologies come together. The projects that are marked urgent by the Red Cross are all in Haiti right now.  Here are is a video playlist that explains the project and how you can help if you are new to OpenStreetMap (OSM).

 

Tags: disasters, mapping, edtechSTEM, weather and climate.

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Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 8:55 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are most vulnerable to natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  My students and I join OpenStreetMap (OSM) projects, especially when there is a major humanitarian need...it's a great way to make service learning and geospatial technologies come together. The projects that are marked urgent by the Red Cross are all in Haiti right now.  Here are is a video playlist that explains the project and how you can help if you are new to OpenStreetMap (OSM).

 

Tags: disasters, mapping, edtechSTEM, weather and climate.

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The Edge of the Plates

The Edge of the Plates | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tomales Bay lies about 50 kilometers (30 miles) northwest of San Francisco, along the edges of two tectonic plates that are grinding past each other. The boundary between them is the San Andreas Fault, the famous rift that partitions California for hundreds of miles. To the west of the Bay is the Pacific plate; to the east is the North American plate. The rock on the western shore of the Bay is granite, an igneous rock that formed underground when molten material slowly cooled over time. On the opposite shore, the land is a mix of several types of marine sedimentary rocks. In Assembling California, John McPhee calls that side “a boneyard of exotica,” a mixture of rock of 'such widespread provenance that it is quite literally a collection from the entire Pacific basin, or even half of the surface of the planet.'"

 

Tags: geomorphologyremote sensing, tectonics, geology, Californiacoastal, physical.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 22, 6:28 AM
Geomorphic processes
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How a Texas grocery chain kept running after Hurricane Harvey

How a Texas grocery chain kept running after Hurricane Harvey | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"One of my stores, we had 300 employees; 140 of them were displaced by the flooding. So how do you put your store back together quickly? We asked for volunteers in the rest of the company. We brought over 2,000 partners from Austin, San Antonio, the Rio Grande Valley. They hopped into cars and they just drove to Houston. They said, we're here to help. For 18 hours a day, they’re going to help us restock and then they'll go sleep on the couch at somebody's house."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Natural disasters complicate the logistics that make our modern economy run.  We take these flows for granted--until they are disrupted. This article is a excellent view into how to operate when disaster strikes. 

 

Tagseconomicindustry, laborglobalizationplace, transportation.

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Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 8:55 PM

Natural disasters complicate the logistics that make our modern economy run.  We take these flows for granted--until they are disrupted. This article is a excellent view into how to operate when disaster strikes. 

 

Tagseconomicindustry, laborglobalizationplace, transportation.

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Why geography matters now more than ever

Why geography matters now more than ever | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures."

Seth Dixon's insight:

You might have seen this article on PBS's Teacher's Lounge, but here is a link to the original (and a good reason to give a shout-out to #worldgeochat on Twitter Tuesday nights at 9pm EST).  This might be seen as another example of me preaching to the choir, but I hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This is a great article to put into my new tag of article that discuss why geography matters.   

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

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LRC's curator insight, September 4, 6:08 PM
Share your insight
Ivan Ius's curator insight, September 5, 11:38 AM
Geographic concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perpsective
Uart.com's curator insight, September 8, 5:22 AM

Geography is more important than ever to explain and understand the art market in globalization and digitization turn.

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Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages

Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This infographic has been making the rounds again this year and it is worth shaing again.  It is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.  Since this only counts one language per person, mother tongues are listed.  Consequently, lingua franca's such as English and France are smaller than you might have presumed them to be.  

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.

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Looking for Love in Small Religion

Looking for Love in Small Religion | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Think modern dating is tough? Try hunting for a husband or wife in the Druze community—adherents are forbidden from marrying outside of the faith. This desire to marry someone within the faith is not just a preference—the religion prohibits exogamy. If a Druze marries a non-Druze, it will not be a Druze wedding, nor can the couple’s children be Druze—the religion can only be passed on through birth to two Druze parents. There are no conversions into the Druze faith."

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#APHGchat--Population

This isn't a complete archive of yesterday's #APHGchat on Population resources, but I'm sharing this to give a peek to the networking that is available online.  The next #APHGchat will be Oct. 18th, 9pm EST. 

 

Tags: social media, APHG.

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Somalia: The Forgotten Story

Part I: The story of Somalia's decline from stability to chaos and the problems facing its people at home and abroad.

Part II: The ongoing civil war has caused serious damage to Somalia's infrastructure and economy. Thousands of Somalis have either left as economic migrants or fled as refugees. Within Somali, more than a million people are internally displaced.

 

Tags: devolutionpolitical, states, unit 4 politicalmigrationrefugees, Somalia, Africa.

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The last globemakers

Peter Bellerby is one of the last artisan globemakers on earth. But now, he's teaching an entirely new generation of artists the secrets of crafting entire worlds by hand.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Yes, these globes are precise archives filled with geospatial data and locational information–however, that pales in comparison to the artistic brilliance of the globes. These hand-crafted globes are truly works of art.  Marvel at the merger of mathematical precision and artistic design that makes a globe such as these a cartographic gem.  If anybody want to get me a Christmas present, you know that I love cartographic gifts.  FUTURE WATCHING: Here is the longer video of the Bellerby Globes being produced.     

 

Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, artgeo-inspiration.

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M Sullivan's curator insight, September 28, 9:38 PM
Incredible hand-crafted globes and their stories.
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The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary

The World Bank is eliminating the term “developing country” from its data vocabulary | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the 2016 edition of its World Development Indicators, the World Bank has made a big choice: It’s no longer distinguishing between 'developed' countries and “developing” ones in the presentation of its data. The change marks an evolution in thinking about the geographic distribution of poverty and prosperity. But it sounds less radical when you consider that nobody has ever agreed on a definition for these terms in the first place. The International Monetary Fund says its own distinction between advanced and emerging market economies “is not based on strict criteria, economic or otherwise.” The United Nations doesn’t have an official definition of a developing country, despite slapping the label on 159 nations. And the World Bank itself had previously simply lumped countries in the bottom two-thirds of gross national income (GNI) into the category, but even that comparatively strict cut-off wasn’t very useful."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Labels and categories are so often problematic, but they are also necessary to make sense of the vast amount of information.  Regional geography is inherently about lumping places together that have commonalities, but acknowledging that many differences from place to place makes the world infinitely varied and complex.  Since we can’t process an infinite amount of complexity, we categorize, for better or for worse.  In education, we are continually trying to show how some categorizations fail, hoping that our students will categorize the information they receive in better ways (non-racist ways for example).  The regional terms we use--Latin America, the Middle East, Europe, etc.—impacts how we think about the world.  Each of those terms highlights a few similarities and ignores some important differences.  The terms More Developed Countries (MDCs), Newly Industrialized Countries (NICs), and Less Developed (LDCs) is how many people have socioeconomically categorized the world’s countries, some preferring developing countries instead of LDCs because it less stigmatizing.  In 2015, many at the World Bank have thought that the term “Developing Countries” obscures more than it reveals.  In 2016, the World Bank removed the term from its database since there are more differences than similarities in the economic structures and trajectories of developing countries.         

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some of the major problems that you see with the term developing country?  Even with its problems, what utility is there in the term?  Will you keep using the term or will you abandon it?  How come? 

 

Tagsdevelopment, statistics, economicindustry.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 29, 3:06 AM

Global challenges: Development

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Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language?

Why Don’t We All Speak the Same Language? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are 7,000 languages spoken on Earth. What are the costs — and benefits — of our modern-day Tower of Babel?
Seth Dixon's insight:

These two podcasts are great mainstream looks at issues that filled with cultural geography content.  So many languages on Earth is clearly inefficient (the EU spends $1 billion per year on translation), and yet, linguistic diversity is such a rich part of humanity's cultural heritage.  Listen to the first episode, Why Don't We All Speak the Same Language? as well as the follow-up episode, What Would Be the Best Universal Language?

 

Tags: languagecultureworldwide, English, regions, diffusiontechnology.

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Pakistan's traditional third gender isn't happy with the trans movement

Pakistan's traditional third gender isn't happy with the trans movement | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For centuries, South Asia has had its own Khawaja Sira or third gender culture. Now, some third gender people in Pakistan say the modern transgender identity is threatening their ancient culture.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Sometimes our assumptions about a society, and how they might react to cultural issues are just that...assumptions.  I for one was very surprised to learn that Pakistan had a traditional third gender. 

 

Tags: culture, developmentpodcast, genderPakistansexuality, South Asia, religion.

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Washington Journal Tim Frazier Discusses Hurricane Irma Disaster

Washington Journal Tim Frazier Discusses Hurricane Irma Disaster | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Georgetown University's Tim Frazier talks about the federal government's management of disaster relief related to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tim Frazier is not only a fantastic geographer with an expertise in disaster management, he was also my volleyball partner on the "Bad Latitudes" team at Penn State.  Good job Tim; great geographic insight and context to understand the response efforts.

 

Tags: disasters, weather and climate.

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Mexico City 1968

Mexico City 1968 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The 1968 Olympics took place in Mexico City, Mexico. It was the first Games ever hosted in a Latin American country. And for Mexico City, the event was an opportunity to show the world that they were a metropolis as worthy as London, Berlin, Rome or Tokyo to host this huge international affair. The 1968 Olympics were decreed 'the Games of Peace.' So Wyman designed a little outline of a dove, which shop owners all over the city had been given to stick in their windows. A protest movement, led by students, was growing in the city around [the organizers and designers]. These protestors believed the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) catered to wealthy Mexicans rather than the poor, rural and working class. Although the country had been experiencing huge economic growth, millions of people had still been left behind. The 'Mexican Miracle' hadn’t reached everyone."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Few years are as powerful in the minds of Mexican identity as the year 1968.  Like so many 99 percent invisible podcasts, this blends urban design, social geography, local history in a way that deepens our understanding of place. The built environment can be molded to project an image, and can be used to subvert that same message by the opposition.    

 

Tagssport, Mexico, Middle America, urban, architecture, place, landscape.

 

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 20, 8:16 AM
How has the disparity of the economy affected the density of population in Mexico?  Did the Olympics ultimately help or hurt Mexico?
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How Does it Grow? Garlic

Telling the stories of our food from field to fork.
Episode Two: Peeling back the layers of nature's most powerful superfood.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 5-minute video is a good introduction to garlic, it's production, environmental requirements, nutritional profile and diffusion.  Historically, garlic was far more important than I ever imagined.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are many more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, industryvideo, agriculture.

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Edward Russell's curator insight, September 12, 5:15 AM
interesting little video
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Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills

Announcing a New Feature to Build Students’ Geography Skills | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As the image above shows, The Times reports from all over the globe. We have journalists in more than 30 international news bureaus worldwide, and every day we publish news, feature stories, videos, slide shows and more from dozens of countries around the world. Our new 'Country of the Week' feature celebrates this abundance to help build students’ geography skills. A weekly interactive quiz will first introduce students to a country via a recent video or photograph, then ask them to find that place on a map. Next, the quiz will focus on the demographics and culture of the country. Finally, we’ll include links to recent reporting from that place in case they, or you, would like to go further.

In 'Why Geography Matters,' Harm de Blij wrote that geography is 'a superb antidote to isolationism and provincialism,' and argued that 'the American public is the geographically most illiterate society of consequence on the planet, at a time when United States power can affect countries and peoples around the world.'

This spatial illiteracy, geographers say, can leave citizens without a framework to think about foreign policy questions more substantively. 'The paucity of geographical knowledge means there is no check on misleading public representations about international matters,' said Alec Murphy, a professor of geography at the University of Oregon."

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

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bintathletics's comment, September 11, 1:46 AM
good
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10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex

10 countries that desperately want people to have more sex | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Roughly half the countries around the world experience low fertility rates, and some get pretty creative in how they encourage procreation.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, September 7, 7:23 AM
Seth Dixon's insight: While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates. While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates. Denmark Russia Japan Romania Singapore South Korea India (Parsis community) Italy Hong Kong Spain
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 8:55 PM

While many countries have anti-natalist policies (policies to discourage more births), other countries with declining populations have pro-natalist policies in an attempt to increase fertility rates.  While not an exhaustive list, this list gives a few more examples that teachers can use to show how countries in stage 4 of the demographic transition are dealing with declining fertility rates.  

 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

Ms. Amanda Fairchild's curator insight, October 16, 1:21 PM
Examples of pro-natalist countries.